Limits...
New Risk Factor for SIDS? Peaks in Cot Deaths Associated with Heat Waves.

Arnold C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Researchers have begun to identify a number of risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, also known as cot death), including swaddling, dressing the infant too warmly, and other behaviors that may cause the sleeping child to overheat... In this issue of EHP, the authors of a new study of SIDS deaths report that hotter outdoor temperatures also may be a risk factor... Although older children are able to rouse themselves and shift their sleeping position to regain adequate oxygen levels, these abilities are underdeveloped in very young infants... A baby’s thermoregulatory system also has not reached maturity. “Infants are not like adults; they don’t have the same ability to regulate temperature through sweating,” says Nathalie Auger, an epidemiologist at the Québec Public Health Institute and lead author of the new EHP study... For each SIDS case, the researchers ascertained the maximum temperatures on the day of and the day before death... Then they compared these temperatures with the maximum temperatures of matched control days... Control days were chosen on the basis of each infant’s death date, such that for a child who died on a Saturday in July 2000, for instance, control days would consist of all the other Saturdays in that month... This study design allowed the researchers to control for confounders such as secondhand smoke exposure, birth weight, and sleep environment... The relationship between higher temperatures and SIDS was stronger for babies aged 3–12 months compared with those aged 1–2 months, with odds ratios of 3.90 and 1.73, respectively, for deaths on days with maximum temperatures of 29°C versus 20°C. “I have to congratulate the authors on doing SIDS research—it’s not an easy task,” says De-Kun Li, a senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, who was not involved in the study... However, he points out an important limitation of the study: Although the authors measured outdoor temperatures, they didn’t measure the actual temperature of the room in which the baby slept... Plenty of SIDS deaths occur in winter when babies are dressed too warmly, and the same could occur during heat waves when houses may be air-conditioned to the point of chilliness, he says. “Understanding causes for SIDS remains a work in progress,” Li says. “It’s very hard to study. ”

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overheating is one of the chief risk factors for SIDS. Parents should dress their babies warmly but not go overboard with clothing and blankets.© David Nigel Owens/Getty Images
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492255&req=5

f1: Overheating is one of the chief risk factors for SIDS. Parents should dress their babies warmly but not go overboard with clothing and blankets.© David Nigel Owens/Getty Images


New Risk Factor for SIDS? Peaks in Cot Deaths Associated with Heat Waves.

Arnold C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Overheating is one of the chief risk factors for SIDS. Parents should dress their babies warmly but not go overboard with clothing and blankets.© David Nigel Owens/Getty Images
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492255&req=5

f1: Overheating is one of the chief risk factors for SIDS. Parents should dress their babies warmly but not go overboard with clothing and blankets.© David Nigel Owens/Getty Images

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Researchers have begun to identify a number of risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, also known as cot death), including swaddling, dressing the infant too warmly, and other behaviors that may cause the sleeping child to overheat... In this issue of EHP, the authors of a new study of SIDS deaths report that hotter outdoor temperatures also may be a risk factor... Although older children are able to rouse themselves and shift their sleeping position to regain adequate oxygen levels, these abilities are underdeveloped in very young infants... A baby’s thermoregulatory system also has not reached maturity. “Infants are not like adults; they don’t have the same ability to regulate temperature through sweating,” says Nathalie Auger, an epidemiologist at the Québec Public Health Institute and lead author of the new EHP study... For each SIDS case, the researchers ascertained the maximum temperatures on the day of and the day before death... Then they compared these temperatures with the maximum temperatures of matched control days... Control days were chosen on the basis of each infant’s death date, such that for a child who died on a Saturday in July 2000, for instance, control days would consist of all the other Saturdays in that month... This study design allowed the researchers to control for confounders such as secondhand smoke exposure, birth weight, and sleep environment... The relationship between higher temperatures and SIDS was stronger for babies aged 3–12 months compared with those aged 1–2 months, with odds ratios of 3.90 and 1.73, respectively, for deaths on days with maximum temperatures of 29°C versus 20°C. “I have to congratulate the authors on doing SIDS research—it’s not an easy task,” says De-Kun Li, a senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, who was not involved in the study... However, he points out an important limitation of the study: Although the authors measured outdoor temperatures, they didn’t measure the actual temperature of the room in which the baby slept... Plenty of SIDS deaths occur in winter when babies are dressed too warmly, and the same could occur during heat waves when houses may be air-conditioned to the point of chilliness, he says. “Understanding causes for SIDS remains a work in progress,” Li says. “It’s very hard to study. ”

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus