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A Second Life For Scraps: Making Biogas From Food Waste.

Dahl R - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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When food decomposes under anaerobic conditions—for instance, buried beneath other waste in a landfill—it produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas... But recently anaerobic digestion has been drawing attention as a method that can not only accomplish greenhouse gas reduction but also use the food waste as an energy source... That operation, the CRMC Dartmouth Bioenergy Facility, is linked to an existing gas-to-energy facility that generates power from landfill methane... Anton Finelli, a principal in CommonWealth Resource Management Corporation, which owns the operation, says the company saw opportunity in the landfill ban. “We realized it would be to our benefit to have the ability right at the landfill to process source-separated organics [i.e., organic matter that consumers have sorted at curbside] that the landfill itself would sooner or later no longer be able to take,” Finelli says. “Our principle motivation here was to have another way to generate a biogas for use at our landfill gas-to-energy facility... And that part of our pilot project has been very successful... More recently, the Stop & Shop Supermarket Company broke ground on an anaerobic digester facility in Freetown, Massachusetts, with a planned capacity of 95 tons per day and expected opening date of early 2016... Universities also see the benefit of using food waste for energy... On 22 April 2014 the University of California, Davis, opened an anaerobic digestion facility with a daily capacity of converting 50 tons of food waste from the campus and area restaurants into 12,000 kWh of energy... Thomas Trabold, director of the Center for Sustainable Mobility at the Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, is a strong proponent of food waste conversion via anaerobic digestion, but he also points out that the outflow of gas and digestate must be properly managed... For instance, the gas must be captured, not leaked to the atmosphere, and digestate may contain chemical and biological contaminants that must be controlled carefully if the material is to be used as a fertilizer... Analyses of waste-to-energy opportunities in New York State by Trabold and colleagues indicate significant potential for and interest in expansion... Trabold predicts a growing role for food waste power generation in the United States. “I definitely think [biodigesters will] become part of the grid, but how significantly remains to be seen,” he says. “It’s going to be a fairly small percentage of the total energy demand, but I think it will become a fairly important part of the portfolio going forward as we move toward more of a distributed power generation model, instead of having a small number of big centralized power plants. ” Fiore adds that anaerobic digestion is also a relatively simple way to affordably implement a steady supply of renewable energy into dense urban areas... The beauty of biogas, he says, is that it helps address energy security by taking advantage of local resources, while fostering the resilience of critical infrastructure and reducing harmful emissions.

No MeSH data available.


Biodigesters use organic waste to produce methane, a relatively clean fuel. Since 2013 Kroger grocery stores have sent this facility all the food they can’t sell or donate.© FEED Resource Recovery, Inc
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f1: Biodigesters use organic waste to produce methane, a relatively clean fuel. Since 2013 Kroger grocery stores have sent this facility all the food they can’t sell or donate.© FEED Resource Recovery, Inc


A Second Life For Scraps: Making Biogas From Food Waste.

Dahl R - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Biodigesters use organic waste to produce methane, a relatively clean fuel. Since 2013 Kroger grocery stores have sent this facility all the food they can’t sell or donate.© FEED Resource Recovery, Inc
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492253&req=5

f1: Biodigesters use organic waste to produce methane, a relatively clean fuel. Since 2013 Kroger grocery stores have sent this facility all the food they can’t sell or donate.© FEED Resource Recovery, Inc

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

When food decomposes under anaerobic conditions—for instance, buried beneath other waste in a landfill—it produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas... But recently anaerobic digestion has been drawing attention as a method that can not only accomplish greenhouse gas reduction but also use the food waste as an energy source... That operation, the CRMC Dartmouth Bioenergy Facility, is linked to an existing gas-to-energy facility that generates power from landfill methane... Anton Finelli, a principal in CommonWealth Resource Management Corporation, which owns the operation, says the company saw opportunity in the landfill ban. “We realized it would be to our benefit to have the ability right at the landfill to process source-separated organics [i.e., organic matter that consumers have sorted at curbside] that the landfill itself would sooner or later no longer be able to take,” Finelli says. “Our principle motivation here was to have another way to generate a biogas for use at our landfill gas-to-energy facility... And that part of our pilot project has been very successful... More recently, the Stop & Shop Supermarket Company broke ground on an anaerobic digester facility in Freetown, Massachusetts, with a planned capacity of 95 tons per day and expected opening date of early 2016... Universities also see the benefit of using food waste for energy... On 22 April 2014 the University of California, Davis, opened an anaerobic digestion facility with a daily capacity of converting 50 tons of food waste from the campus and area restaurants into 12,000 kWh of energy... Thomas Trabold, director of the Center for Sustainable Mobility at the Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, is a strong proponent of food waste conversion via anaerobic digestion, but he also points out that the outflow of gas and digestate must be properly managed... For instance, the gas must be captured, not leaked to the atmosphere, and digestate may contain chemical and biological contaminants that must be controlled carefully if the material is to be used as a fertilizer... Analyses of waste-to-energy opportunities in New York State by Trabold and colleagues indicate significant potential for and interest in expansion... Trabold predicts a growing role for food waste power generation in the United States. “I definitely think [biodigesters will] become part of the grid, but how significantly remains to be seen,” he says. “It’s going to be a fairly small percentage of the total energy demand, but I think it will become a fairly important part of the portfolio going forward as we move toward more of a distributed power generation model, instead of having a small number of big centralized power plants. ” Fiore adds that anaerobic digestion is also a relatively simple way to affordably implement a steady supply of renewable energy into dense urban areas... The beauty of biogas, he says, is that it helps address energy security by taking advantage of local resources, while fostering the resilience of critical infrastructure and reducing harmful emissions.

No MeSH data available.