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Inclusion of sorghum, millet and cottonseed meal in broiler diets: a meta-analysis of effects on performance.

Batonon-Alavo DI, Umar Faruk M, Lescoat P, Weber GM, Bastianelli D - Animal (2015)

Bottom Line: No effect of the level of substitution of sorghum on feed intake was found; however, growth performance decreased when the level of substitution of corn by sorghum increased.Cottonseed meal was substituted to soybean meal up to 40% and found to increase feed intake while reducing growth performance.An additional work is scheduled to validate these statistical results in vivo and to evaluate the interactions induced with the simultaneous inclusions of sorghum, millet and cottonseed meal in broiler feeding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1INRA,UR83 Recherches Avicoles,F-37380 Nouzilly,France.

ABSTRACT
A meta-analysis was conducted (i) to evaluate broiler response to partial or total substitution of corn by sorghum and millet and (ii) to determine the effect of soybean meal replacement by cottonseed meal in broiler diet. The database included 190 treatments from 29 experiments published from 1990 to 2013. Bird responses to an experimental diet were calculated relative to the control (Experimental-Control), and were submitted to mixed-effect models. Results showed that diets containing millet led to similar performance as the corn-based ones for all parameters, whereas sorghum-based diets decreased growth performance. No major effect of the level of substitution was observed with millet or cottonseed meal. No effect of the level of substitution of sorghum on feed intake was found; however, growth performance decreased when the level of substitution of corn by sorghum increased. Cottonseed meal was substituted to soybean meal up to 40% and found to increase feed intake while reducing growth performance. Young birds were not more sensitive to these ingredients than older birds since there was no negative effect of these ingredients on performance in the starter phase. Results obtained for sorghum pointed out the necessity to find technological improvements that will increase the utilization of these feedstuffs in broiler diet. An additional work is scheduled to validate these statistical results in vivo and to evaluate the interactions induced with the simultaneous inclusions of sorghum, millet and cottonseed meal in broiler feeding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between the calculated metabolizable energy (ME) and CP contents andCP and amino acids contents of diets used in sorghum (●), millet (▲) and cottonseedmeal (+) experiments, respectively. Each point is a treatment average andobservations are connected within each experiment. The dashed lines represent thelinear adjustment between the two variables.
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fig1: Relationship between the calculated metabolizable energy (ME) and CP contents andCP and amino acids contents of diets used in sorghum (●), millet (▲) and cottonseedmeal (+) experiments, respectively. Each point is a treatment average andobservations are connected within each experiment. The dashed lines represent thelinear adjustment between the two variables.

Mentions: Information about the feed ingredient cultivar or variety used was rarely mentioned inthe publications and not all nutrients contents were given in the publications. Therefore,to ensure consistency within the database, the nutritional values (metabolizable energy,CP and amino acid) of each treatment were estimated using NRC tables of feedstuffscomposition (NRC, 1994). S.bicolor composition was chosen for treatments involving sorghum, whereas pearlmillet (P. glaucum) was retained for millet experiments. Nutritionalcomposition of cottonseed meal-based diets was estimated using cottonseed meal(Gossypium spp.) prepressed solvent extracted, 44% protein (NRC, 1994). Calculated nutritional composition of thetreatments in each experiment is illustrated Figure1. Each point is a treatment average. Large nutritional changes have been observedbetween and within experiment. No relationship existed between ME and CP contents. For asimilar ME content in cottonseed meal diets, different levels of CP were observed. Lysineand methionine contents were positively related to protein level in the diet.Figure 1


Inclusion of sorghum, millet and cottonseed meal in broiler diets: a meta-analysis of effects on performance.

Batonon-Alavo DI, Umar Faruk M, Lescoat P, Weber GM, Bastianelli D - Animal (2015)

Relationship between the calculated metabolizable energy (ME) and CP contents andCP and amino acids contents of diets used in sorghum (●), millet (▲) and cottonseedmeal (+) experiments, respectively. Each point is a treatment average andobservations are connected within each experiment. The dashed lines represent thelinear adjustment between the two variables.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492222&req=5

fig1: Relationship between the calculated metabolizable energy (ME) and CP contents andCP and amino acids contents of diets used in sorghum (●), millet (▲) and cottonseedmeal (+) experiments, respectively. Each point is a treatment average andobservations are connected within each experiment. The dashed lines represent thelinear adjustment between the two variables.
Mentions: Information about the feed ingredient cultivar or variety used was rarely mentioned inthe publications and not all nutrients contents were given in the publications. Therefore,to ensure consistency within the database, the nutritional values (metabolizable energy,CP and amino acid) of each treatment were estimated using NRC tables of feedstuffscomposition (NRC, 1994). S.bicolor composition was chosen for treatments involving sorghum, whereas pearlmillet (P. glaucum) was retained for millet experiments. Nutritionalcomposition of cottonseed meal-based diets was estimated using cottonseed meal(Gossypium spp.) prepressed solvent extracted, 44% protein (NRC, 1994). Calculated nutritional composition of thetreatments in each experiment is illustrated Figure1. Each point is a treatment average. Large nutritional changes have been observedbetween and within experiment. No relationship existed between ME and CP contents. For asimilar ME content in cottonseed meal diets, different levels of CP were observed. Lysineand methionine contents were positively related to protein level in the diet.Figure 1

Bottom Line: No effect of the level of substitution of sorghum on feed intake was found; however, growth performance decreased when the level of substitution of corn by sorghum increased.Cottonseed meal was substituted to soybean meal up to 40% and found to increase feed intake while reducing growth performance.An additional work is scheduled to validate these statistical results in vivo and to evaluate the interactions induced with the simultaneous inclusions of sorghum, millet and cottonseed meal in broiler feeding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1INRA,UR83 Recherches Avicoles,F-37380 Nouzilly,France.

ABSTRACT
A meta-analysis was conducted (i) to evaluate broiler response to partial or total substitution of corn by sorghum and millet and (ii) to determine the effect of soybean meal replacement by cottonseed meal in broiler diet. The database included 190 treatments from 29 experiments published from 1990 to 2013. Bird responses to an experimental diet were calculated relative to the control (Experimental-Control), and were submitted to mixed-effect models. Results showed that diets containing millet led to similar performance as the corn-based ones for all parameters, whereas sorghum-based diets decreased growth performance. No major effect of the level of substitution was observed with millet or cottonseed meal. No effect of the level of substitution of sorghum on feed intake was found; however, growth performance decreased when the level of substitution of corn by sorghum increased. Cottonseed meal was substituted to soybean meal up to 40% and found to increase feed intake while reducing growth performance. Young birds were not more sensitive to these ingredients than older birds since there was no negative effect of these ingredients on performance in the starter phase. Results obtained for sorghum pointed out the necessity to find technological improvements that will increase the utilization of these feedstuffs in broiler diet. An additional work is scheduled to validate these statistical results in vivo and to evaluate the interactions induced with the simultaneous inclusions of sorghum, millet and cottonseed meal in broiler feeding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus