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Late ventricular septal defect due to blunt trauma.

Soleimanpour H, Shams Vahdati S, Fakhree MB - Bioimpacts (2015)

Bottom Line: He was transferred to emergency department by emergency medical services.There was a lately developed large apical VSD with delayed cardiopulmonary deterioration.The defect was recognized more than 10 days after accident, and repaired the day after.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This is very rare case report regarding late ventricular septal defect (VSD) following blunt trauma.

Case report: A 23-year-old motorcycle rider lost control and crashed to another motorcycle. He was transferred to emergency department by emergency medical services. Initial evaluation revealed some minor trauma which was managed, and he was discharged. There was a lately developed large apical VSD with delayed cardiopulmonary deterioration. The defect was recognized more than 10 days after accident, and repaired the day after.

Discussion: Most VSD patients with blunt trauma remain asymptomatic following trauma while those with no primary findings experience gradual decompensation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Mentions: One week after discharge from the orthopedic ward, he developed exertional dyspenia that was progressive. The patient was re-evaluated for chest lesions, with a finding of left side pleural effusion. A chest tube was placed. In bed-side echocardiography, a large VSD (connection site of moderator band to inferior vena cava (IVC), size =9 mm in diameter, 2 cm) with left to right shunt was found (Fig. 1, panels A and B). There was no right ventricular hypertrophy or sign of Eisenmenger syndrome at the echocardiography.


Late ventricular septal defect due to blunt trauma.

Soleimanpour H, Shams Vahdati S, Fakhree MB - Bioimpacts (2015)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492190&req=5

Mentions: One week after discharge from the orthopedic ward, he developed exertional dyspenia that was progressive. The patient was re-evaluated for chest lesions, with a finding of left side pleural effusion. A chest tube was placed. In bed-side echocardiography, a large VSD (connection site of moderator band to inferior vena cava (IVC), size =9 mm in diameter, 2 cm) with left to right shunt was found (Fig. 1, panels A and B). There was no right ventricular hypertrophy or sign of Eisenmenger syndrome at the echocardiography.

Bottom Line: He was transferred to emergency department by emergency medical services.There was a lately developed large apical VSD with delayed cardiopulmonary deterioration.The defect was recognized more than 10 days after accident, and repaired the day after.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This is very rare case report regarding late ventricular septal defect (VSD) following blunt trauma.

Case report: A 23-year-old motorcycle rider lost control and crashed to another motorcycle. He was transferred to emergency department by emergency medical services. Initial evaluation revealed some minor trauma which was managed, and he was discharged. There was a lately developed large apical VSD with delayed cardiopulmonary deterioration. The defect was recognized more than 10 days after accident, and repaired the day after.

Discussion: Most VSD patients with blunt trauma remain asymptomatic following trauma while those with no primary findings experience gradual decompensation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus