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Diverticulum, or not Diverticulum, That Is the Question! Discussing About a Case of Left Ventricular Outpouching Associated With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

Capasso R, Panelo M, Fiorelli A, Carbone I, Galea N - J Cardiovasc Thorac Res (2015)

Bottom Line: We describe a rare case of LVO associated with bicuspid aortic valve incidentally found in an asymptomatic adult patient.In this case ventricular geometry was not respected, wall thickness was reduced and wall motion compromised therefore corresponding to a small IIc-type, which is considered having the poorest prognosis.The patient refused surgery and preferred follow-up.

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Affiliation: Department of Internal Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Congenital left ventricular outpouchings (LVOs) are infrequent myocardial malformations, comprising various overlapping abnormalities, whose characterization is often intricate in clinical practice using traditional non-invasive techniques. We describe a rare case of LVO associated with bicuspid aortic valve incidentally found in an asymptomatic adult patient. The LVO was located at basal level of the chamber, crescent-shaped with its largest diameter in short-axis view and presented a thin hypo-contractile wall without hyperintense areas on late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) images. This description corresponds to an overlap between usual definition of aneurism, fibrous and muscular diverticulum. The LVO was evaluated according with a classification recently proposed by Malakan Rad. In this case ventricular geometry was not respected, wall thickness was reduced and wall motion compromised therefore corresponding to a small IIc-type, which is considered having the poorest prognosis. Furthermore, the association with bicuspid aortic valve is very unusual. The patient refused surgery and preferred follow-up.

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Mentions: Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) images showed no hyperintense areas within the LVO myocardial wall (Figure 2a-b).


Diverticulum, or not Diverticulum, That Is the Question! Discussing About a Case of Left Ventricular Outpouching Associated With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

Capasso R, Panelo M, Fiorelli A, Carbone I, Galea N - J Cardiovasc Thorac Res (2015)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492182&req=5

Mentions: Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) images showed no hyperintense areas within the LVO myocardial wall (Figure 2a-b).

Bottom Line: We describe a rare case of LVO associated with bicuspid aortic valve incidentally found in an asymptomatic adult patient.In this case ventricular geometry was not respected, wall thickness was reduced and wall motion compromised therefore corresponding to a small IIc-type, which is considered having the poorest prognosis.The patient refused surgery and preferred follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Congenital left ventricular outpouchings (LVOs) are infrequent myocardial malformations, comprising various overlapping abnormalities, whose characterization is often intricate in clinical practice using traditional non-invasive techniques. We describe a rare case of LVO associated with bicuspid aortic valve incidentally found in an asymptomatic adult patient. The LVO was located at basal level of the chamber, crescent-shaped with its largest diameter in short-axis view and presented a thin hypo-contractile wall without hyperintense areas on late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) images. This description corresponds to an overlap between usual definition of aneurism, fibrous and muscular diverticulum. The LVO was evaluated according with a classification recently proposed by Malakan Rad. In this case ventricular geometry was not respected, wall thickness was reduced and wall motion compromised therefore corresponding to a small IIc-type, which is considered having the poorest prognosis. Furthermore, the association with bicuspid aortic valve is very unusual. The patient refused surgery and preferred follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus