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Changes in Simple Spirometric Parameters After Lobectomy for Bronchial Carcinoma.

Drakou E, Kanakis MA, Papadimitriou L, Iacovidou N, Vrachnis N, Nicolouzos S, Loukas C, Lioulias A - J Cardiovasc Thorac Res (2015)

Bottom Line: An average percentage increase of 8.7% was observed at the time period of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation.Although, we observed a significant decrease in FEV1 and FVC after the operation, all patients were in excellent clinical status.FEV1 and FVC of 6 months were increased in comparison with the respective values of 1 month after the operation, but did not reach the preoperative values in any patient.

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Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sismanoglio General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe the postoperative changes in lung function after pure open lobectomy for lung carcinoma.

Methods: 30 patients (mean age 64 ± 7 years old, 16 men and 14 women) underwent a left or right lobectomy. They underwent spirometric pulmonary tests preoperatively, and at 1 and 6 months after the operation.

Results: The average preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was 2.55±0.62lt and the mean postoperative FEV1 at 1 and 6 months was 1.97 ± 0.59 L and 2.15±0.66 L respectively. The percentage losses for FEV1 were 22.7% and 15.4% after 1 and 6 months respectively. An average percentage increase of 9.4% for FEV1 was estimated at the time of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation. The average preoperative forced vital capacity (FVC) was 3.17 ± 0.81 L and the mean postoperative FVC at 1 and 6 months after the operation was 2.50 ± 0.63 L and 2.72 ± 0.67 L respectively. The percentage losses for FVC were 21.1% and 14.2% after 1 and 6 months respectively. An average percentage increase of 8.7% was observed at the time period of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation.

Conclusion: Although, we observed a significant decrease in FEV1 and FVC after the operation, all patients were in excellent clinical status. FEV1 and FVC of 6 months were increased in comparison with the respective values of 1 month after the operation, but did not reach the preoperative values in any patient.

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Mentions: The average preoperative FVC was 3.17 ± 0.81 L and the mean postoperative FVC at 1 and 6 months after the operation was 2.50 ± 0.63 L and 2.72 ± 0.67 L respectively. Therefore FVC decreased significantly 1 month after operation and improved after 6 months, but remained in decreased levels compared with the preoperative values (Table 2). The percentage losses for FVC were 21.1% and 14.2% after 1 and 6 months respectively. An average percentage increase of 8.7% was observed at the time period of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation (Figure 2).


Changes in Simple Spirometric Parameters After Lobectomy for Bronchial Carcinoma.

Drakou E, Kanakis MA, Papadimitriou L, Iacovidou N, Vrachnis N, Nicolouzos S, Loukas C, Lioulias A - J Cardiovasc Thorac Res (2015)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492181&req=5

Mentions: The average preoperative FVC was 3.17 ± 0.81 L and the mean postoperative FVC at 1 and 6 months after the operation was 2.50 ± 0.63 L and 2.72 ± 0.67 L respectively. Therefore FVC decreased significantly 1 month after operation and improved after 6 months, but remained in decreased levels compared with the preoperative values (Table 2). The percentage losses for FVC were 21.1% and 14.2% after 1 and 6 months respectively. An average percentage increase of 8.7% was observed at the time period of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: An average percentage increase of 8.7% was observed at the time period of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation.Although, we observed a significant decrease in FEV1 and FVC after the operation, all patients were in excellent clinical status.FEV1 and FVC of 6 months were increased in comparison with the respective values of 1 month after the operation, but did not reach the preoperative values in any patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sismanoglio General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe the postoperative changes in lung function after pure open lobectomy for lung carcinoma.

Methods: 30 patients (mean age 64 ± 7 years old, 16 men and 14 women) underwent a left or right lobectomy. They underwent spirometric pulmonary tests preoperatively, and at 1 and 6 months after the operation.

Results: The average preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was 2.55±0.62lt and the mean postoperative FEV1 at 1 and 6 months was 1.97 ± 0.59 L and 2.15±0.66 L respectively. The percentage losses for FEV1 were 22.7% and 15.4% after 1 and 6 months respectively. An average percentage increase of 9.4% for FEV1 was estimated at the time of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation. The average preoperative forced vital capacity (FVC) was 3.17 ± 0.81 L and the mean postoperative FVC at 1 and 6 months after the operation was 2.50 ± 0.63 L and 2.72 ± 0.67 L respectively. The percentage losses for FVC were 21.1% and 14.2% after 1 and 6 months respectively. An average percentage increase of 8.7% was observed at the time period of 6 months in comparison with this of 1 month after the operation.

Conclusion: Although, we observed a significant decrease in FEV1 and FVC after the operation, all patients were in excellent clinical status. FEV1 and FVC of 6 months were increased in comparison with the respective values of 1 month after the operation, but did not reach the preoperative values in any patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus