Limits...
The future of computer-aided sperm analysis.

Mortimer ST, van der Horst G, Mortimer D - Asian J. Androl. (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: CASA has also been used with great success for measuring semen characteristics such as sperm concentration and proportions of progressive motility in many animal species, including wide application in domesticated animal production laboratories and reproductive toxicology.However, attempts to use CASA for human clinical semen analysis have largely met with poor success due to the inherent difficulties presented by many human semen samples caused by sperm clumping and heavy background debris that, until now, have precluded accurate digital image analysis.Specific requirements for validating CASA technology as a semi-automated system for human semen analysis are also provided, with particular reference to the accuracy and uncertainty of measurement expected of a robust medical laboratory test for implementation in clinical laboratories operating according to modern accreditation standards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oozoa Biomedical, West Vancouver, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) technology was developed in the late 1980s for analyzing sperm movement characteristics or kinematics and has been highly successful in enabling this field of research. CASA has also been used with great success for measuring semen characteristics such as sperm concentration and proportions of progressive motility in many animal species, including wide application in domesticated animal production laboratories and reproductive toxicology. However, attempts to use CASA for human clinical semen analysis have largely met with poor success due to the inherent difficulties presented by many human semen samples caused by sperm clumping and heavy background debris that, until now, have precluded accurate digital image analysis. The authors review the improved capabilities of two modern CASA platforms (Hamilton Thorne CASA-II and Microptic SCA6) and consider their current and future applications with particular reference to directing our focus towards using this technology to assess functional rather than simple descriptive characteristics of spermatozoa. Specific requirements for validating CASA technology as a semi-automated system for human semen analysis are also provided, with particular reference to the accuracy and uncertainty of measurement expected of a robust medical laboratory test for implementation in clinical laboratories operating according to modern accreditation standards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentages of rapidly progressive human spermatozoa from three PureSperm fractions (Fractions 1 to 3 = 40%, 60% and 80% respectively) compared when incubated with increasing concentrations of caffeine; Treatment 1 = control; Treatments 2–4 increasing concentrations of caffeine from 2 to 10 mmol l-1.51
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492043&req=5

Figure 4: Percentages of rapidly progressive human spermatozoa from three PureSperm fractions (Fractions 1 to 3 = 40%, 60% and 80% respectively) compared when incubated with increasing concentrations of caffeine; Treatment 1 = control; Treatments 2–4 increasing concentrations of caffeine from 2 to 10 mmol l-1.51

Mentions: Besides these predictors of sperm fertilizing potential, the percentages of rapid, medium and slow swimming spermatozoa in semen are also considered by many andrologists to be of great importance, but primarily that of rapidly progressively motile spermatozoa.46 Maree and van der Horst50 described a method of determining the VCL cut-off values for these sub-classifications in several species including humans with the SCA, and these cut-off values have revealed differences in this measure of sperm quality among different fractions of spermatozoa obtained following density gradient centrifugation and in their response to caffeine51 (Figure 4).


The future of computer-aided sperm analysis.

Mortimer ST, van der Horst G, Mortimer D - Asian J. Androl. (2015 Jul-Aug)

Percentages of rapidly progressive human spermatozoa from three PureSperm fractions (Fractions 1 to 3 = 40%, 60% and 80% respectively) compared when incubated with increasing concentrations of caffeine; Treatment 1 = control; Treatments 2–4 increasing concentrations of caffeine from 2 to 10 mmol l-1.51
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492043&req=5

Figure 4: Percentages of rapidly progressive human spermatozoa from three PureSperm fractions (Fractions 1 to 3 = 40%, 60% and 80% respectively) compared when incubated with increasing concentrations of caffeine; Treatment 1 = control; Treatments 2–4 increasing concentrations of caffeine from 2 to 10 mmol l-1.51
Mentions: Besides these predictors of sperm fertilizing potential, the percentages of rapid, medium and slow swimming spermatozoa in semen are also considered by many andrologists to be of great importance, but primarily that of rapidly progressively motile spermatozoa.46 Maree and van der Horst50 described a method of determining the VCL cut-off values for these sub-classifications in several species including humans with the SCA, and these cut-off values have revealed differences in this measure of sperm quality among different fractions of spermatozoa obtained following density gradient centrifugation and in their response to caffeine51 (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: CASA has also been used with great success for measuring semen characteristics such as sperm concentration and proportions of progressive motility in many animal species, including wide application in domesticated animal production laboratories and reproductive toxicology.However, attempts to use CASA for human clinical semen analysis have largely met with poor success due to the inherent difficulties presented by many human semen samples caused by sperm clumping and heavy background debris that, until now, have precluded accurate digital image analysis.Specific requirements for validating CASA technology as a semi-automated system for human semen analysis are also provided, with particular reference to the accuracy and uncertainty of measurement expected of a robust medical laboratory test for implementation in clinical laboratories operating according to modern accreditation standards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oozoa Biomedical, West Vancouver, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) technology was developed in the late 1980s for analyzing sperm movement characteristics or kinematics and has been highly successful in enabling this field of research. CASA has also been used with great success for measuring semen characteristics such as sperm concentration and proportions of progressive motility in many animal species, including wide application in domesticated animal production laboratories and reproductive toxicology. However, attempts to use CASA for human clinical semen analysis have largely met with poor success due to the inherent difficulties presented by many human semen samples caused by sperm clumping and heavy background debris that, until now, have precluded accurate digital image analysis. The authors review the improved capabilities of two modern CASA platforms (Hamilton Thorne CASA-II and Microptic SCA6) and consider their current and future applications with particular reference to directing our focus towards using this technology to assess functional rather than simple descriptive characteristics of spermatozoa. Specific requirements for validating CASA technology as a semi-automated system for human semen analysis are also provided, with particular reference to the accuracy and uncertainty of measurement expected of a robust medical laboratory test for implementation in clinical laboratories operating according to modern accreditation standards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus