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Use of Curcuma longa L. extract to stain various tissue samples for histological studies.

Kumar S, Singh NN, Singh A, Singh N, Sinha RK - Ayu (2014 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: These dried turmeric rhizomes were milled to form fine powder, which was then processed to form dye for staining tissue structures.It revealed that turmeric can be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, its staining ability was also good and comparable to that of eosin dye with a special affinity for collagen and muscle fibers.Turmeric dye can be used as a histological stain, which stains similar to eosin dye and its specific affinity for collagen and muscle fibers authenticates its role in the treatment of collagen and muscle disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Kothiwal Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Curcuma longa L. is a perennial herb and a member of the Zingiberaceae (ginger) family, which is used extensively in foods as well as in Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine. Current researches have focused on its antioxidant, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial properties. Until now, very few studies suggested its role as a histological stain.

Aim: To ascertain its efficacy to be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, to compare it's staining ability with that of routinely used eosin dye and also to ascertain its role in various collagen diseases.

Materials and methods: Turmeric rhizomes were cut into small pieces and were dried. These dried turmeric rhizomes were milled to form fine powder, which was then processed to form dye for staining tissue structures.

Results: It revealed that turmeric can be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, its staining ability was also good and comparable to that of eosin dye with a special affinity for collagen and muscle fibers.

Conclusion: Turmeric dye can be used as a histological stain, which stains similar to eosin dye and its specific affinity for collagen and muscle fibers authenticates its role in the treatment of collagen and muscle disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Supernatant in a coupling jar
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Figure 2: Supernatant in a coupling jar

Mentions: The rhizomes of C. longa were collected from Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttrakhand, India. Rhizomes were then cut into small pieces and were dried. They were then milled to form fine powder using mixer [Figure 1], 15 g of this powdered plant material was weighed using electronic/digital weighing machine, which was then dissolved in 100 ml of 70% alcohol in a borosil beaker and was transferred to 5 ml borosil test tubes, which was then centrifuged in a centrifuge machine (REMI R4C LAB CENTRIFUGE) at 3000 rpm for 5 min and the supernatant was collected with the help of micropipettes in a coupling jar [Figure 2]. Phytochemical evaluation of this supernatant (turmeric dye) which was used for staining various tissue structures revealed the presence of flavonoids, deoxy sugars and free anthraquinone. In our study, addition of mordant like potassium aluminum alum, acidic solution like 1% glacial acetic acid, alkaline solution like 1% ammonium hydroxide were also used, but none of these improve the staining qualities of C. longa. Hence, it was concluded that turmeric dye alone should be used as a stain. In order to standardize this turmeric dye various concentrations of turmeric powder (5 g, 10 g, and 15 g) were also used in 100 ml of 70% alcohol but out of all these only 15 g of turmeric powder in 100 ml of 70% alcohol provides the best result and hence this was employed for staining the tissue sections. Thus, this is a pilot study.


Use of Curcuma longa L. extract to stain various tissue samples for histological studies.

Kumar S, Singh NN, Singh A, Singh N, Sinha RK - Ayu (2014 Oct-Dec)

Supernatant in a coupling jar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492033&req=5

Figure 2: Supernatant in a coupling jar
Mentions: The rhizomes of C. longa were collected from Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttrakhand, India. Rhizomes were then cut into small pieces and were dried. They were then milled to form fine powder using mixer [Figure 1], 15 g of this powdered plant material was weighed using electronic/digital weighing machine, which was then dissolved in 100 ml of 70% alcohol in a borosil beaker and was transferred to 5 ml borosil test tubes, which was then centrifuged in a centrifuge machine (REMI R4C LAB CENTRIFUGE) at 3000 rpm for 5 min and the supernatant was collected with the help of micropipettes in a coupling jar [Figure 2]. Phytochemical evaluation of this supernatant (turmeric dye) which was used for staining various tissue structures revealed the presence of flavonoids, deoxy sugars and free anthraquinone. In our study, addition of mordant like potassium aluminum alum, acidic solution like 1% glacial acetic acid, alkaline solution like 1% ammonium hydroxide were also used, but none of these improve the staining qualities of C. longa. Hence, it was concluded that turmeric dye alone should be used as a stain. In order to standardize this turmeric dye various concentrations of turmeric powder (5 g, 10 g, and 15 g) were also used in 100 ml of 70% alcohol but out of all these only 15 g of turmeric powder in 100 ml of 70% alcohol provides the best result and hence this was employed for staining the tissue sections. Thus, this is a pilot study.

Bottom Line: These dried turmeric rhizomes were milled to form fine powder, which was then processed to form dye for staining tissue structures.It revealed that turmeric can be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, its staining ability was also good and comparable to that of eosin dye with a special affinity for collagen and muscle fibers.Turmeric dye can be used as a histological stain, which stains similar to eosin dye and its specific affinity for collagen and muscle fibers authenticates its role in the treatment of collagen and muscle disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Kothiwal Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Curcuma longa L. is a perennial herb and a member of the Zingiberaceae (ginger) family, which is used extensively in foods as well as in Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine. Current researches have focused on its antioxidant, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial properties. Until now, very few studies suggested its role as a histological stain.

Aim: To ascertain its efficacy to be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, to compare it's staining ability with that of routinely used eosin dye and also to ascertain its role in various collagen diseases.

Materials and methods: Turmeric rhizomes were cut into small pieces and were dried. These dried turmeric rhizomes were milled to form fine powder, which was then processed to form dye for staining tissue structures.

Results: It revealed that turmeric can be used as a counterstain after hematoxylin, its staining ability was also good and comparable to that of eosin dye with a special affinity for collagen and muscle fibers.

Conclusion: Turmeric dye can be used as a histological stain, which stains similar to eosin dye and its specific affinity for collagen and muscle fibers authenticates its role in the treatment of collagen and muscle disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus