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Evaluation of acute toxicity and anti-ulcerogenic study of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.).

Rajashekhara N, Ashok BK, Sharma PP, Ravishankar B - Ayu (2014 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: Both the drugs did not produce any toxic symptoms or mortality even up to the maximum dose level of 4400 mg/kg.However, the reversal of hypothermia found statistically significant in the rhizome starch of the M. arundinacea treated group.M. arundinacea had better anti-stress activity in comparision to C. angustifolia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dravyaguna Vijnana, K.V.G. Ayurveda Medical College and Hospital, Sullia, Dakshina Kannada, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disorders like hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently now days because of a faulty lifestyle. Starches (Satwa) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely, Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. (Fam. Zingiberaceae) and Maranta arundinacea Linn. (Fam. Marantaceae) are used in folklore practice, as Tugaksheeree, for the treatment of the above-mentioned complaints.

Aim: To assess the acute toxicity potential of the C. angustifolia and M. arundinacea along with their assessment for adaptogenic activity, by noting their effect on forced swimming-induced hypothermia and gastric ulceration in rats.

Materials and methods: For acute toxicity study, the effect of test drugs C. angustifolia and M. arundinacea rhizome starch were studied after a single administration of up to three dose levels, with 4400 mg/kg as the maximum dose. The animals were observed for 72 hours periodically and mortality was recorded up to seven days. The adaptogenic and anti-ulcer activities were assessed by determining and comparing the changes in rectal temperature, ponderal changes, ulcer index and histopathological parameters in the test drug group with that of stress control group.

Results: Both the drugs did not produce any toxic symptoms or mortality even up to the maximum dose level of 4400 mg/kg. Both the test drugs significantly reversed the stress-induced gastric ulceration in comparison to stress-control rats. Starch from rhizome of C. angustifolia reversed forced swimming-induced hypothermia apparently, but not to a significant extent. However, the reversal of hypothermia found statistically significant in the rhizome starch of the M. arundinacea treated group.

Conclusion: M. arundinacea had better anti-stress activity in comparision to C. angustifolia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrograph of representative sections of the stomach of albino rats of the Curcuma angustifolia Roxb.–treated group (1 X 400 magnification). Note: Comparatively less epithelial layer damage
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Figure 3: Photomicrograph of representative sections of the stomach of albino rats of the Curcuma angustifolia Roxb.–treated group (1 X 400 magnification). Note: Comparatively less epithelial layer damage


Evaluation of acute toxicity and anti-ulcerogenic study of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.).

Rajashekhara N, Ashok BK, Sharma PP, Ravishankar B - Ayu (2014 Oct-Dec)

Photomicrograph of representative sections of the stomach of albino rats of the Curcuma angustifolia Roxb.–treated group (1 X 400 magnification). Note: Comparatively less epithelial layer damage
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492030&req=5

Figure 3: Photomicrograph of representative sections of the stomach of albino rats of the Curcuma angustifolia Roxb.–treated group (1 X 400 magnification). Note: Comparatively less epithelial layer damage
Bottom Line: Both the drugs did not produce any toxic symptoms or mortality even up to the maximum dose level of 4400 mg/kg.However, the reversal of hypothermia found statistically significant in the rhizome starch of the M. arundinacea treated group.M. arundinacea had better anti-stress activity in comparision to C. angustifolia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dravyaguna Vijnana, K.V.G. Ayurveda Medical College and Hospital, Sullia, Dakshina Kannada, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disorders like hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently now days because of a faulty lifestyle. Starches (Satwa) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely, Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. (Fam. Zingiberaceae) and Maranta arundinacea Linn. (Fam. Marantaceae) are used in folklore practice, as Tugaksheeree, for the treatment of the above-mentioned complaints.

Aim: To assess the acute toxicity potential of the C. angustifolia and M. arundinacea along with their assessment for adaptogenic activity, by noting their effect on forced swimming-induced hypothermia and gastric ulceration in rats.

Materials and methods: For acute toxicity study, the effect of test drugs C. angustifolia and M. arundinacea rhizome starch were studied after a single administration of up to three dose levels, with 4400 mg/kg as the maximum dose. The animals were observed for 72 hours periodically and mortality was recorded up to seven days. The adaptogenic and anti-ulcer activities were assessed by determining and comparing the changes in rectal temperature, ponderal changes, ulcer index and histopathological parameters in the test drug group with that of stress control group.

Results: Both the drugs did not produce any toxic symptoms or mortality even up to the maximum dose level of 4400 mg/kg. Both the test drugs significantly reversed the stress-induced gastric ulceration in comparison to stress-control rats. Starch from rhizome of C. angustifolia reversed forced swimming-induced hypothermia apparently, but not to a significant extent. However, the reversal of hypothermia found statistically significant in the rhizome starch of the M. arundinacea treated group.

Conclusion: M. arundinacea had better anti-stress activity in comparision to C. angustifolia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus