Limits...
Knowledge, attitudes and use of labour analgesia among women at a low-income country antenatal clinic.

Nabukenya MT, Kintu A, Wabule A, Muyingo MT, Kwizera A - BMC Anesthesiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Unlike in high-income countries, pain relief in labour in Africa is not a well established service, especially in the low-income countries like Uganda.The study was conducted in the general antenatal clinic at the Mulago National Referral Hospital.Obstetricians and anaesthesiologists have a role to educate the women, and to provide this much desired service.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Makerere University and Mulago National Refferal Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. marietessie@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Childbirth is one of the most painful experiences of a woman's life. Authorities in the fields of obstetrics and anaesthesia encourage use of labour analgesia. Unlike in high-income countries, pain relief in labour in Africa is not a well established service, especially in the low-income countries like Uganda. Little is known about whether parturients would be amenable to labour analgesia. We sought to determine knowledge, attitudes and use of labour analgesia among women attending the antenatal clinic at Mulago National Referral Hospital.

Methods: Upon obtaining institutional approval, we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study. Women were requested to complete the researcher-administered survey following informed consent. The study was conducted in the general antenatal clinic at the Mulago National Referral Hospital.

Results: Of 1293 participants interviewed, only 7 % of the participants had knowledge of labour analgesia. Of the multiparous mothers 87.9 % did not have labour analgesia in their previous deliveries, although 79.2 % of them had delivered in a national referral hospital. The commonest reason for refusal of labour analgesia was to experience natural childbirth. 87.7 % of the participants wanted labour analgesia for their next delivery.

Conclusion: There is a wide gap between the desire for labour analgesia and its availability. Obstetricians and anaesthesiologists have a role to educate the women, and to provide this much desired service.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Known methods among those who had knowledge of labour analgesia
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492001&req=5

Fig5: Known methods among those who had knowledge of labour analgesia

Mentions: Majority (47 %) of those who knew about labour analgesia got the information from friends and family,26 % from the previous labour, 7 % from the media and 1 % from literature (Fig. 4). Among methods of analgesia known, 24 (26 %) women said local herbs (“others” in Fig. 5), 19 (21 %) injection in the lower back (whether spinal or epidural), among others (Fig. 5). No mother mentioned “epidural” in particular, however. The study showed multiparity had a positive correlation (0.52 CI 0.32–0.85, p-value 0.009) with acceptability of labour analgesia, while age and education did not affect acceptability (p-values > 0.08). Also, those who had history of Caesarean section were less likely to accept labour analgesia (1.88 CI 1.34 – 2.63, p-value 0.001).Fig. 4


Knowledge, attitudes and use of labour analgesia among women at a low-income country antenatal clinic.

Nabukenya MT, Kintu A, Wabule A, Muyingo MT, Kwizera A - BMC Anesthesiol (2015)

Known methods among those who had knowledge of labour analgesia
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492001&req=5

Fig5: Known methods among those who had knowledge of labour analgesia
Mentions: Majority (47 %) of those who knew about labour analgesia got the information from friends and family,26 % from the previous labour, 7 % from the media and 1 % from literature (Fig. 4). Among methods of analgesia known, 24 (26 %) women said local herbs (“others” in Fig. 5), 19 (21 %) injection in the lower back (whether spinal or epidural), among others (Fig. 5). No mother mentioned “epidural” in particular, however. The study showed multiparity had a positive correlation (0.52 CI 0.32–0.85, p-value 0.009) with acceptability of labour analgesia, while age and education did not affect acceptability (p-values > 0.08). Also, those who had history of Caesarean section were less likely to accept labour analgesia (1.88 CI 1.34 – 2.63, p-value 0.001).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Unlike in high-income countries, pain relief in labour in Africa is not a well established service, especially in the low-income countries like Uganda.The study was conducted in the general antenatal clinic at the Mulago National Referral Hospital.Obstetricians and anaesthesiologists have a role to educate the women, and to provide this much desired service.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Makerere University and Mulago National Refferal Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. marietessie@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Childbirth is one of the most painful experiences of a woman's life. Authorities in the fields of obstetrics and anaesthesia encourage use of labour analgesia. Unlike in high-income countries, pain relief in labour in Africa is not a well established service, especially in the low-income countries like Uganda. Little is known about whether parturients would be amenable to labour analgesia. We sought to determine knowledge, attitudes and use of labour analgesia among women attending the antenatal clinic at Mulago National Referral Hospital.

Methods: Upon obtaining institutional approval, we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study. Women were requested to complete the researcher-administered survey following informed consent. The study was conducted in the general antenatal clinic at the Mulago National Referral Hospital.

Results: Of 1293 participants interviewed, only 7 % of the participants had knowledge of labour analgesia. Of the multiparous mothers 87.9 % did not have labour analgesia in their previous deliveries, although 79.2 % of them had delivered in a national referral hospital. The commonest reason for refusal of labour analgesia was to experience natural childbirth. 87.7 % of the participants wanted labour analgesia for their next delivery.

Conclusion: There is a wide gap between the desire for labour analgesia and its availability. Obstetricians and anaesthesiologists have a role to educate the women, and to provide this much desired service.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus