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Loiasis in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Central Africa.

Kobayashi T, Hayakawa K, Mawatari M, Itoh M, Akao N, Yotsu RR, Sugihara J, Takeshita N, Kutsuna S, Fujiya Y, Kanagawa S, Ohmagari N, Kato Y - Trop Med Health (2015)

Bottom Line: A 52-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital complaining of discomfort in her eyes and skin.She reported having frequently visited Central Africa over many years and having been extensively exposed to the rainforest climate and ecosystem.Although no microfilariae were found in her blood, there was an elevated level of IgG antibodies against the crude antigens of Brugia pahangi, which have cross-reactivity with Loa loa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine , Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We encountered a probable case of loiasis in a returned traveler from Central Africa. A 52-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital complaining of discomfort in her eyes and skin. She reported having frequently visited Central Africa over many years and having been extensively exposed to the rainforest climate and ecosystem. Although no microfilariae were found in her blood, there was an elevated level of IgG antibodies against the crude antigens of Brugia pahangi, which have cross-reactivity with Loa loa. She was treated with albendazole for 21 days, after which the antigen-specific IgG level decreased and no relapse occurred.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Levels of IgG to B. pahangi. The patient’s IgG level was higher than those of negative controls (n = 28). NC = negative controls; Pt = patient before treatment.
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Figure 1: Levels of IgG to B. pahangi. The patient’s IgG level was higher than those of negative controls (n = 28). NC = negative controls; Pt = patient before treatment.

Mentions: Upon initial examination at the outpatient clinic, her physical examination was unremarkable except for a few reddish papules on the back of her neck, which our dermatologist determined to be a scar left by the removal of larvae during treatment the patient received for myiasis in Africa. Her blood test showed no abnormalities, and the eosinophil count was within the normal range. Although smeared samples of her blood taken at noon revealed no microfilaria, there was a slight elevation of IgG against filarial antigen (Brugia pahangi female crude antigens), compared to that of healthy individuals (Fig. 1). The serum was sent for screening for antibodies against the following parasites (SRL, Tokyo, Japan), which turned out to be negative: Dirofilaria immitis, Toxocara canis, Ascaris suum, Anisakis larvae, Gnathostoma spp., Strongyloides stercoralis, Paragonimus westermani, Paragonimus miyazaki, Clonorchis sinensis, Fasciola hepatica, Cysticercus cellulosae, and Spirometra erinaceieuropaei.


Loiasis in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Central Africa.

Kobayashi T, Hayakawa K, Mawatari M, Itoh M, Akao N, Yotsu RR, Sugihara J, Takeshita N, Kutsuna S, Fujiya Y, Kanagawa S, Ohmagari N, Kato Y - Trop Med Health (2015)

Levels of IgG to B. pahangi. The patient’s IgG level was higher than those of negative controls (n = 28). NC = negative controls; Pt = patient before treatment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491493&req=5

Figure 1: Levels of IgG to B. pahangi. The patient’s IgG level was higher than those of negative controls (n = 28). NC = negative controls; Pt = patient before treatment.
Mentions: Upon initial examination at the outpatient clinic, her physical examination was unremarkable except for a few reddish papules on the back of her neck, which our dermatologist determined to be a scar left by the removal of larvae during treatment the patient received for myiasis in Africa. Her blood test showed no abnormalities, and the eosinophil count was within the normal range. Although smeared samples of her blood taken at noon revealed no microfilaria, there was a slight elevation of IgG against filarial antigen (Brugia pahangi female crude antigens), compared to that of healthy individuals (Fig. 1). The serum was sent for screening for antibodies against the following parasites (SRL, Tokyo, Japan), which turned out to be negative: Dirofilaria immitis, Toxocara canis, Ascaris suum, Anisakis larvae, Gnathostoma spp., Strongyloides stercoralis, Paragonimus westermani, Paragonimus miyazaki, Clonorchis sinensis, Fasciola hepatica, Cysticercus cellulosae, and Spirometra erinaceieuropaei.

Bottom Line: A 52-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital complaining of discomfort in her eyes and skin.She reported having frequently visited Central Africa over many years and having been extensively exposed to the rainforest climate and ecosystem.Although no microfilariae were found in her blood, there was an elevated level of IgG antibodies against the crude antigens of Brugia pahangi, which have cross-reactivity with Loa loa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine , Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We encountered a probable case of loiasis in a returned traveler from Central Africa. A 52-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital complaining of discomfort in her eyes and skin. She reported having frequently visited Central Africa over many years and having been extensively exposed to the rainforest climate and ecosystem. Although no microfilariae were found in her blood, there was an elevated level of IgG antibodies against the crude antigens of Brugia pahangi, which have cross-reactivity with Loa loa. She was treated with albendazole for 21 days, after which the antigen-specific IgG level decreased and no relapse occurred.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus