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Short-Term High Fat Intake Does Not Significantly Alter Markers of Renal Function or Inflammation in Young Male Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Crinigan C, Calhoun M, Sweazea KL - J Nutr Metab (2015)

Bottom Line: Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow.Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure.Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.

ABSTRACT
Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD) is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow. The hypothesis was that short-term HFD would induce early signs of renal disease. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or standard chow (5% fat) for six weeks. Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure. Kidney function was measured by analyzing urinary protein, creatinine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, as well as plasma cystatin C concentrations. Renal damage was measured through assessment of urinary oxDNA/RNA concentrations as well as renal lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology. These findings suggest that moderate hyperglycemia and inflammation produced by short-term HFD are not sufficient to damage kidneys or that the ketogenic HFD may have protective effects within the kidneys.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative images of hematoxylin and eosin stained renal tissue sections from HFD animals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining shows no signs of morphological damage.
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fig1: Representative images of hematoxylin and eosin stained renal tissue sections from HFD animals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining shows no signs of morphological damage.

Mentions: Morphological analyses using hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections showed no structural differences between the chow and HFD groups, indicating that although the mass of the HFD kidneys was increased, damage to the microstructure of the kidneys was not evident (Figure 1).


Short-Term High Fat Intake Does Not Significantly Alter Markers of Renal Function or Inflammation in Young Male Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Crinigan C, Calhoun M, Sweazea KL - J Nutr Metab (2015)

Representative images of hematoxylin and eosin stained renal tissue sections from HFD animals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining shows no signs of morphological damage.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491386&req=5

fig1: Representative images of hematoxylin and eosin stained renal tissue sections from HFD animals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining shows no signs of morphological damage.
Mentions: Morphological analyses using hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections showed no structural differences between the chow and HFD groups, indicating that although the mass of the HFD kidneys was increased, damage to the microstructure of the kidneys was not evident (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow.Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure.Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.

ABSTRACT
Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD) is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow. The hypothesis was that short-term HFD would induce early signs of renal disease. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or standard chow (5% fat) for six weeks. Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure. Kidney function was measured by analyzing urinary protein, creatinine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, as well as plasma cystatin C concentrations. Renal damage was measured through assessment of urinary oxDNA/RNA concentrations as well as renal lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology. These findings suggest that moderate hyperglycemia and inflammation produced by short-term HFD are not sufficient to damage kidneys or that the ketogenic HFD may have protective effects within the kidneys.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus