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Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion.

Pelgrim GJ, Das M, Haberland U, Slump C, Handayani A, van Tuijl S, Stijnen M, Klotz E, Oudkerk M, Wildberger JE, Vliegenthart R - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup.During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9-1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg.An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging.

Methods: One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0.

Results: CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9-1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades.

Conclusion: An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of images of the Cx artery with an FFR of 0.30. (a) The computed tomography angiography (CTA) image in curved multiplanar reformat shows the luminal narrowing. (b) The resulting perfusion defect in segment 5 as visible on maximum intensity projection (MIP) image.
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fig2: Example of images of the Cx artery with an FFR of 0.30. (a) The computed tomography angiography (CTA) image in curved multiplanar reformat shows the luminal narrowing. (b) The resulting perfusion defect in segment 5 as visible on maximum intensity projection (MIP) image.

Mentions: Image quality of the coronary CTA scans was high, with HU values of over 325 in the coronary arteries (Figure 2). In the dynamic scans, the heart could be imaged in total (Figure 3). Based on the total occlusion scan, the flow territory of the Cx was found to be limited to segment 5 (Figures 2 and 4). The relatively limited extent of ischemia was due to a small size Cx artery in this porcine heart.


Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion.

Pelgrim GJ, Das M, Haberland U, Slump C, Handayani A, van Tuijl S, Stijnen M, Klotz E, Oudkerk M, Wildberger JE, Vliegenthart R - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Example of images of the Cx artery with an FFR of 0.30. (a) The computed tomography angiography (CTA) image in curved multiplanar reformat shows the luminal narrowing. (b) The resulting perfusion defect in segment 5 as visible on maximum intensity projection (MIP) image.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491382&req=5

fig2: Example of images of the Cx artery with an FFR of 0.30. (a) The computed tomography angiography (CTA) image in curved multiplanar reformat shows the luminal narrowing. (b) The resulting perfusion defect in segment 5 as visible on maximum intensity projection (MIP) image.
Mentions: Image quality of the coronary CTA scans was high, with HU values of over 325 in the coronary arteries (Figure 2). In the dynamic scans, the heart could be imaged in total (Figure 3). Based on the total occlusion scan, the flow territory of the Cx was found to be limited to segment 5 (Figures 2 and 4). The relatively limited extent of ischemia was due to a small size Cx artery in this porcine heart.

Bottom Line: CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup.During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9-1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg.An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging.

Methods: One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0.

Results: CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9-1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades.

Conclusion: An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus