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The lipopeptides pseudofactin II and surfactin effectively decrease Candida albicans adhesion and hydrophobicity.

Biniarz P, Baranowska G, Feder-Kubis J, Krasowska A - Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek (2015)

Bottom Line: When microplates were pre-coated with biosurfactants, PF II was less active than SU, but when cells were incubated together with biosurfactants, the activity of both compounds was similar, independent of the CSH of strains.This suggests irreversible changes in the cell wall after the treatment with biosurfactants.Preincubation of C. albicans with biosurfactants caused extraction of cell wall proteins with molecular mass in the range of 10-40 kDa, which is one possible mechanism of action of the tested lipopeptides.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wrocław, ul. Fryderyka Joliot-Curie 14a, 50-383, Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT
A serious problem for humans is the propensity of Candida albicans to adhere to various surfaces and its ability to form biofilms. Surfactants or biosurfactants can affect the cell surfaces of microorganisms and block their adhesion to different substrates. This study investigated adhesion of C. albicans strains differing in cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) to polystyrene microplates in order to compare the ability of lipopeptide biosurfactants pseudofactin (PF II) and surfactin (SU) to prevent fungal adhesion to polystyrene. The biosurfactants decreased adhesion of tested strains by 35-90 % when microplates were conditioned before the addition of cells. A 80-90 % reduction of adhesion was observed when cells were incubated together with lipopeptides in microplates. When microplates were pre-coated with biosurfactants, PF II was less active than SU, but when cells were incubated together with biosurfactants, the activity of both compounds was similar, independent of the CSH of strains. When cells were preincubated with lipopeptides and then the compounds were washed out, the adhesion of hydrophobic strains increased two times in comparison to control samples. This suggests irreversible changes in the cell wall after the treatment with biosurfactants. CSH of hydrophobic strains decreased only by 20-60 % after incubation with biosurfactants while adhesion decreased by 80-90 %; the changes in cell adhesion can be thus only partially explained through the modification of CSH. Preincubation of C. albicans with biosurfactants caused extraction of cell wall proteins with molecular mass in the range of 10-40 kDa, which is one possible mechanism of action of the tested lipopeptides.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth of C. albicans strains in the presence of 0.035 mg/ml (grey bars) and 0.1 mg/ml (inverse-hatched bars) PF II in PBS or 0.005 mg/ml (hatched bars) and 0.015 mg/ml (white bars) SU in PBS, compared to control (black bars)
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Fig2: Growth of C. albicans strains in the presence of 0.035 mg/ml (grey bars) and 0.1 mg/ml (inverse-hatched bars) PF II in PBS or 0.005 mg/ml (hatched bars) and 0.015 mg/ml (white bars) SU in PBS, compared to control (black bars)

Mentions: Microbial surfactants often have antimicrobial properties but knowledge about mechanisms of their action is scarce. A few studies have shown that rhamnolipids increase the membrane permeability and alter its barrier function, causing cell damage (Sotirova et al. 2008). Lipopeptides such as SU, iturin or lichenisyn form ion-conducting membrane channels (Pueyo et al. 2009; Bensaci et al. 2011). In contrast to many other lipopeptides (Peypoux et al. 1999; Grangemard et al. 2001), PF II showed much weaker antimicrobial activity against bacterial and C. albicans strains (Janek et al. 2012). Also SU in tested concentrations exhibited no antifungal activity (Fig. 2). PF II was found to possess an antiadhesive, concentration-dependent activity against bacteria and yeast. The highest reduction of adhesion (80–99 %) was observed for C. albicans wild-type strain SC5314 (Janek et al. 2012). PF II was effective above the critical micelle concentration (0.072 mg/ml) and the adhesion was thus inhibited more strongly by micelles than by monomers (Janek et al. 2012). The microbial adhesion depends on the composition of the outer cell layer and is connected with hydrophobic/hydrophilic and ionic properties of the cell as well as with the properties of the polystyrene surface of microplates used in experiments (Neu 1996). PF II, due to its nonionic character, can probably coat positively or negatively charged surfaces, changing their properties.Fig. 2


The lipopeptides pseudofactin II and surfactin effectively decrease Candida albicans adhesion and hydrophobicity.

Biniarz P, Baranowska G, Feder-Kubis J, Krasowska A - Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek (2015)

Growth of C. albicans strains in the presence of 0.035 mg/ml (grey bars) and 0.1 mg/ml (inverse-hatched bars) PF II in PBS or 0.005 mg/ml (hatched bars) and 0.015 mg/ml (white bars) SU in PBS, compared to control (black bars)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491367&req=5

Fig2: Growth of C. albicans strains in the presence of 0.035 mg/ml (grey bars) and 0.1 mg/ml (inverse-hatched bars) PF II in PBS or 0.005 mg/ml (hatched bars) and 0.015 mg/ml (white bars) SU in PBS, compared to control (black bars)
Mentions: Microbial surfactants often have antimicrobial properties but knowledge about mechanisms of their action is scarce. A few studies have shown that rhamnolipids increase the membrane permeability and alter its barrier function, causing cell damage (Sotirova et al. 2008). Lipopeptides such as SU, iturin or lichenisyn form ion-conducting membrane channels (Pueyo et al. 2009; Bensaci et al. 2011). In contrast to many other lipopeptides (Peypoux et al. 1999; Grangemard et al. 2001), PF II showed much weaker antimicrobial activity against bacterial and C. albicans strains (Janek et al. 2012). Also SU in tested concentrations exhibited no antifungal activity (Fig. 2). PF II was found to possess an antiadhesive, concentration-dependent activity against bacteria and yeast. The highest reduction of adhesion (80–99 %) was observed for C. albicans wild-type strain SC5314 (Janek et al. 2012). PF II was effective above the critical micelle concentration (0.072 mg/ml) and the adhesion was thus inhibited more strongly by micelles than by monomers (Janek et al. 2012). The microbial adhesion depends on the composition of the outer cell layer and is connected with hydrophobic/hydrophilic and ionic properties of the cell as well as with the properties of the polystyrene surface of microplates used in experiments (Neu 1996). PF II, due to its nonionic character, can probably coat positively or negatively charged surfaces, changing their properties.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: When microplates were pre-coated with biosurfactants, PF II was less active than SU, but when cells were incubated together with biosurfactants, the activity of both compounds was similar, independent of the CSH of strains.This suggests irreversible changes in the cell wall after the treatment with biosurfactants.Preincubation of C. albicans with biosurfactants caused extraction of cell wall proteins with molecular mass in the range of 10-40 kDa, which is one possible mechanism of action of the tested lipopeptides.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wrocław, ul. Fryderyka Joliot-Curie 14a, 50-383, Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT
A serious problem for humans is the propensity of Candida albicans to adhere to various surfaces and its ability to form biofilms. Surfactants or biosurfactants can affect the cell surfaces of microorganisms and block their adhesion to different substrates. This study investigated adhesion of C. albicans strains differing in cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) to polystyrene microplates in order to compare the ability of lipopeptide biosurfactants pseudofactin (PF II) and surfactin (SU) to prevent fungal adhesion to polystyrene. The biosurfactants decreased adhesion of tested strains by 35-90 % when microplates were conditioned before the addition of cells. A 80-90 % reduction of adhesion was observed when cells were incubated together with lipopeptides in microplates. When microplates were pre-coated with biosurfactants, PF II was less active than SU, but when cells were incubated together with biosurfactants, the activity of both compounds was similar, independent of the CSH of strains. When cells were preincubated with lipopeptides and then the compounds were washed out, the adhesion of hydrophobic strains increased two times in comparison to control samples. This suggests irreversible changes in the cell wall after the treatment with biosurfactants. CSH of hydrophobic strains decreased only by 20-60 % after incubation with biosurfactants while adhesion decreased by 80-90 %; the changes in cell adhesion can be thus only partially explained through the modification of CSH. Preincubation of C. albicans with biosurfactants caused extraction of cell wall proteins with molecular mass in the range of 10-40 kDa, which is one possible mechanism of action of the tested lipopeptides.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus