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Development and initial testing of a GDM information website for multi-ethnic women with GDM.

Carolan-Olah M, Steele C, Krenzin G - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2015)

Bottom Line: Results indicated that the intervention was effective at improving knowledge scores and this effect was greatest in the first domain, knowledge of GDM.Although some improvement of knowledge scores occurred in the other two domains, food values and self-management principles, these improvements were less than expected.This finding may relate to a number of misunderstandings in the interpretation of the web resource and survey questions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, St Alban's Campus, PO Box 14228, Melbourne, 8001, Australia. Mary.carolan@vu.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 5-15 % of pregnant women in Australia. Highest rates are seen among women who are obese, from specific ethnic backgrounds and low socio-economic circumstance. These features also impact on uptake of self-management recommendations. GDM that is not well managed can give rise to serious pregnancy complications. The aim of this project was to develop and test an intervention to improve knowledge of GDM and GDM self-management principles.

Methods: A web-based intervention, consisting of resources aimed at a low level of literacy, was developed and tested among multi-ethnic women at a metropolitan hospital in Melbourne Australia. A basic one-group pre-test/post-test design was used to explore the impact of the intervention on knowledge, in 3 domains: (1) Knowledge of GDM; (2) food values, and;(3) GDM self-management principles. Questionnaire data was analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 21.0. Fisher's exact test was used to test for an improvement in each knowledge scale.

Results: Twenty-one women with GDM, from multi-ethnic backgrounds, participated in the testing of the intervention. Results indicated that the intervention was effective at improving knowledge scores and this effect was greatest in the first domain, knowledge of GDM. Although some improvement of knowledge scores occurred in the other two domains, food values and self-management principles, these improvements were less than expected. This finding may relate to a number of misunderstandings in the interpretation of the web resource and survey questions. These issues will need to be resolved prior to proceeding to a clinical trial.

Conclusion: Initial results from this study look promising and suggest that with some improvements, the intervention could prove a useful adjunct support for women with GDM from multi-ethnic and low socio-economic backgrounds. Conducting a randomised controlled trial is feasible in the future and will provide a useful means of examining efficacy of the intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Questions commonly misunderstood
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Fig2: Questions commonly misunderstood

Mentions: The initial testing identified a number of questions that participants particularly misunderstood (Fig. 2) and which were answered incorrectly more often in the post-test than in the pre-test. A number of factors contributed to this situation. For example, question 1 (Fig. 2) had more than one correct answer and participants were likely to identify being overweight and specific ethnicity as predictors of GDM, but did not recognise maternal age and parity >3, as predictors. For question 2, many women were unable to recognise the food value of butter and very often choose (a.) protein or (e.) I don’t know. In question 3, participants choose (b.) should exercise more than women who do not have gestational diabetes more often than (a.) should take moderate exercise such as walking and in question 4, many women identified one or two snacks as suitable for women with GDM, but not all.Fig. 2


Development and initial testing of a GDM information website for multi-ethnic women with GDM.

Carolan-Olah M, Steele C, Krenzin G - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2015)

Questions commonly misunderstood
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491240&req=5

Fig2: Questions commonly misunderstood
Mentions: The initial testing identified a number of questions that participants particularly misunderstood (Fig. 2) and which were answered incorrectly more often in the post-test than in the pre-test. A number of factors contributed to this situation. For example, question 1 (Fig. 2) had more than one correct answer and participants were likely to identify being overweight and specific ethnicity as predictors of GDM, but did not recognise maternal age and parity >3, as predictors. For question 2, many women were unable to recognise the food value of butter and very often choose (a.) protein or (e.) I don’t know. In question 3, participants choose (b.) should exercise more than women who do not have gestational diabetes more often than (a.) should take moderate exercise such as walking and in question 4, many women identified one or two snacks as suitable for women with GDM, but not all.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Results indicated that the intervention was effective at improving knowledge scores and this effect was greatest in the first domain, knowledge of GDM.Although some improvement of knowledge scores occurred in the other two domains, food values and self-management principles, these improvements were less than expected.This finding may relate to a number of misunderstandings in the interpretation of the web resource and survey questions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, St Alban's Campus, PO Box 14228, Melbourne, 8001, Australia. Mary.carolan@vu.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 5-15 % of pregnant women in Australia. Highest rates are seen among women who are obese, from specific ethnic backgrounds and low socio-economic circumstance. These features also impact on uptake of self-management recommendations. GDM that is not well managed can give rise to serious pregnancy complications. The aim of this project was to develop and test an intervention to improve knowledge of GDM and GDM self-management principles.

Methods: A web-based intervention, consisting of resources aimed at a low level of literacy, was developed and tested among multi-ethnic women at a metropolitan hospital in Melbourne Australia. A basic one-group pre-test/post-test design was used to explore the impact of the intervention on knowledge, in 3 domains: (1) Knowledge of GDM; (2) food values, and;(3) GDM self-management principles. Questionnaire data was analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 21.0. Fisher's exact test was used to test for an improvement in each knowledge scale.

Results: Twenty-one women with GDM, from multi-ethnic backgrounds, participated in the testing of the intervention. Results indicated that the intervention was effective at improving knowledge scores and this effect was greatest in the first domain, knowledge of GDM. Although some improvement of knowledge scores occurred in the other two domains, food values and self-management principles, these improvements were less than expected. This finding may relate to a number of misunderstandings in the interpretation of the web resource and survey questions. These issues will need to be resolved prior to proceeding to a clinical trial.

Conclusion: Initial results from this study look promising and suggest that with some improvements, the intervention could prove a useful adjunct support for women with GDM from multi-ethnic and low socio-economic backgrounds. Conducting a randomised controlled trial is feasible in the future and will provide a useful means of examining efficacy of the intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus