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Effectiveness of a systematic approach to promote intersectoral collaboration in comprehensive school health promotion-a multiple-case study using quantitative and qualitative data.

Pucher KK, Candel MJ, Krumeich A, Boot NM, De Vries NK - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results support a systematic approach to intersectoral collaboration using the DISC model.They also suggest five main management styles to improve intersectoral collaboration in the initial stage.The outcomes are useful for health professionals involved in similar ventures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, Peter Debyeplein 1a, Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, Netherlands. Katharina.pucher@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: We report on the longitudinal quantitative and qualitative data resulting from a two-year trajectory (2008-2011) based on the DIagnosis of Sustainable Collaboration (DISC) model. This trajectory aimed to support regional coordinators of comprehensive school health promotion (CSHP) in systematically developing change management and project management to establish intersectoral collaboration.

Methods: Multilevel analyses of quantitative data on the determinants of collaborations according to the DISC model were done, with 90 respondents (response 57 %) at pretest and 69 respondents (52 %) at posttest. Nvivo analyses of the qualitative data collected during the trajectory included minutes of monthly/bimonthly personal/telephone interviews (N = 65) with regional coordinators, and documents they produced about their activities.

Results: Quantitative data showed major improvements in change management and project management. There were also improvements in consensus development, commitment formation, formalization of the CSHP, and alignment of policies, although organizational problems within the collaboration increased. Content analyses of qualitative data identified five main management styles, including (1) facilitating active involvement of relevant parties; (2) informing collaborating parties; (3) controlling and (4) supporting their task accomplishment; and (5) coordinating the collaborative processes.

Conclusions: We have contributed to the fundamental understanding of the development of intersectoral collaboration by combining qualitative and quantitative data. Our results support a systematic approach to intersectoral collaboration using the DISC model. They also suggest five main management styles to improve intersectoral collaboration in the initial stage. The outcomes are useful for health professionals involved in similar ventures.

No MeSH data available.


Operationalization of the DISC advice by regional coordinators: five management styles
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Fig1: Operationalization of the DISC advice by regional coordinators: five management styles

Mentions: We identified a great variety of working methods and instruments that the regional coordinators applied in response to the DISC-based advice, which clustered into five main management styles (Fig. 1). Below we summarize how these management styles were used in practice.Fig. 1


Effectiveness of a systematic approach to promote intersectoral collaboration in comprehensive school health promotion-a multiple-case study using quantitative and qualitative data.

Pucher KK, Candel MJ, Krumeich A, Boot NM, De Vries NK - BMC Public Health (2015)

Operationalization of the DISC advice by regional coordinators: five management styles
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491197&req=5

Fig1: Operationalization of the DISC advice by regional coordinators: five management styles
Mentions: We identified a great variety of working methods and instruments that the regional coordinators applied in response to the DISC-based advice, which clustered into five main management styles (Fig. 1). Below we summarize how these management styles were used in practice.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Our results support a systematic approach to intersectoral collaboration using the DISC model.They also suggest five main management styles to improve intersectoral collaboration in the initial stage.The outcomes are useful for health professionals involved in similar ventures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, Peter Debyeplein 1a, Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, Netherlands. Katharina.pucher@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: We report on the longitudinal quantitative and qualitative data resulting from a two-year trajectory (2008-2011) based on the DIagnosis of Sustainable Collaboration (DISC) model. This trajectory aimed to support regional coordinators of comprehensive school health promotion (CSHP) in systematically developing change management and project management to establish intersectoral collaboration.

Methods: Multilevel analyses of quantitative data on the determinants of collaborations according to the DISC model were done, with 90 respondents (response 57 %) at pretest and 69 respondents (52 %) at posttest. Nvivo analyses of the qualitative data collected during the trajectory included minutes of monthly/bimonthly personal/telephone interviews (N = 65) with regional coordinators, and documents they produced about their activities.

Results: Quantitative data showed major improvements in change management and project management. There were also improvements in consensus development, commitment formation, formalization of the CSHP, and alignment of policies, although organizational problems within the collaboration increased. Content analyses of qualitative data identified five main management styles, including (1) facilitating active involvement of relevant parties; (2) informing collaborating parties; (3) controlling and (4) supporting their task accomplishment; and (5) coordinating the collaborative processes.

Conclusions: We have contributed to the fundamental understanding of the development of intersectoral collaboration by combining qualitative and quantitative data. Our results support a systematic approach to intersectoral collaboration using the DISC model. They also suggest five main management styles to improve intersectoral collaboration in the initial stage. The outcomes are useful for health professionals involved in similar ventures.

No MeSH data available.