Limits...
Ultralow noise miniature external cavity semiconductor laser.

Liang W, Ilchenko VS, Eliyahu D, Savchenkov AA, Matsko AB, Seidel D, Maleki L - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: Advanced applications in optical metrology demand improved lasers with high spectral purity, in form factors that are small and insensitive to environmental perturbations.However, stability and spectral purity improvements of these lasers have only been validated with rack-mounted support equipment, assembled with fibre lasers to marginally improve their noise performance.In this work we report on a realization of a heterogeneously integrated, chip-scale semiconductor laser featuring 30-Hz integral linewidth as well as sub-Hz instantaneous linewidth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: OEwaves Inc., 465 North Halstead Street, Suite 140, Pasadena, California 91107, USA.

ABSTRACT
Advanced applications in optical metrology demand improved lasers with high spectral purity, in form factors that are small and insensitive to environmental perturbations. While laboratory-scale lasers with extraordinarily high stability and low noise have been reported, all-integrated chip-scale devices with sub-100 Hz linewidth have not been previously demonstrated. Lasers integrated with optical microresonators as external cavities have the potential for substantial reduction of noise. However, stability and spectral purity improvements of these lasers have only been validated with rack-mounted support equipment, assembled with fibre lasers to marginally improve their noise performance. In this work we report on a realization of a heterogeneously integrated, chip-scale semiconductor laser featuring 30-Hz integral linewidth as well as sub-Hz instantaneous linewidth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the experimental set-up.Light from the pump laser (a semiconductor DFB laser) enters the whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) through the prism. Part of light is reflected back to the laser because of Rayleigh scattering in the resonator. The light exiting the prism is collimated and used for processing. Insets show power distribution in the resonator mode (a), a picture of the actual resonator (b) as well as a picture of the packaged laser (c).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491184&req=5

f1: Schematic of the experimental set-up.Light from the pump laser (a semiconductor DFB laser) enters the whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) through the prism. Part of light is reflected back to the laser because of Rayleigh scattering in the resonator. The light exiting the prism is collimated and used for processing. Insets show power distribution in the resonator mode (a), a picture of the actual resonator (b) as well as a picture of the packaged laser (c).

Mentions: The laser set-up is schematically shown in Fig. 1. Light emitted from a 1,550-nm semiconductor DFB laser mounted on a ceramic submount is collimated and sent into a MgF2 WGM resonator using a glass coupling prism. The resonator has an unloaded Q-factor of ∼6 × 109, and its loaded quality factor is 6 × 108. Surface Rayleigh scattering43 results in forming WGM doublets with frequency splitting on the order of 100 kHz.


Ultralow noise miniature external cavity semiconductor laser.

Liang W, Ilchenko VS, Eliyahu D, Savchenkov AA, Matsko AB, Seidel D, Maleki L - Nat Commun (2015)

Schematic of the experimental set-up.Light from the pump laser (a semiconductor DFB laser) enters the whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) through the prism. Part of light is reflected back to the laser because of Rayleigh scattering in the resonator. The light exiting the prism is collimated and used for processing. Insets show power distribution in the resonator mode (a), a picture of the actual resonator (b) as well as a picture of the packaged laser (c).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491184&req=5

f1: Schematic of the experimental set-up.Light from the pump laser (a semiconductor DFB laser) enters the whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) through the prism. Part of light is reflected back to the laser because of Rayleigh scattering in the resonator. The light exiting the prism is collimated and used for processing. Insets show power distribution in the resonator mode (a), a picture of the actual resonator (b) as well as a picture of the packaged laser (c).
Mentions: The laser set-up is schematically shown in Fig. 1. Light emitted from a 1,550-nm semiconductor DFB laser mounted on a ceramic submount is collimated and sent into a MgF2 WGM resonator using a glass coupling prism. The resonator has an unloaded Q-factor of ∼6 × 109, and its loaded quality factor is 6 × 108. Surface Rayleigh scattering43 results in forming WGM doublets with frequency splitting on the order of 100 kHz.

Bottom Line: Advanced applications in optical metrology demand improved lasers with high spectral purity, in form factors that are small and insensitive to environmental perturbations.However, stability and spectral purity improvements of these lasers have only been validated with rack-mounted support equipment, assembled with fibre lasers to marginally improve their noise performance.In this work we report on a realization of a heterogeneously integrated, chip-scale semiconductor laser featuring 30-Hz integral linewidth as well as sub-Hz instantaneous linewidth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: OEwaves Inc., 465 North Halstead Street, Suite 140, Pasadena, California 91107, USA.

ABSTRACT
Advanced applications in optical metrology demand improved lasers with high spectral purity, in form factors that are small and insensitive to environmental perturbations. While laboratory-scale lasers with extraordinarily high stability and low noise have been reported, all-integrated chip-scale devices with sub-100 Hz linewidth have not been previously demonstrated. Lasers integrated with optical microresonators as external cavities have the potential for substantial reduction of noise. However, stability and spectral purity improvements of these lasers have only been validated with rack-mounted support equipment, assembled with fibre lasers to marginally improve their noise performance. In this work we report on a realization of a heterogeneously integrated, chip-scale semiconductor laser featuring 30-Hz integral linewidth as well as sub-Hz instantaneous linewidth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus