Limits...
Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

Wu GH, Hsu SH - J Med Biol Eng (2015)

Bottom Line: Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography.There are advantages and limitations for each method.Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT

Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme of digital light processing (DLP). Digital mirror device is used in process to illuminate entire layer of resin surface
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491116&req=5

Fig4: Scheme of digital light processing (DLP). Digital mirror device is used in process to illuminate entire layer of resin surface

Mentions: Digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing uses a laser to cure a polymer. A scheme of DLP is shown in Fig. 4. Compared to SLA, which is a bottom-up process, DLP is a top-down process and is relatively faster. During the process, a digital mirror device (DMD) is used to control the curing laser beam. DMD has an array of micro-mirrors, which can rotate independently to control the laser beam to an on or off state. With the use of DMD, an entire layer can be cured at once, which makes DLP faster than the conventional SLA process. For tissue engineering, PEGDA hydrogel scaffolds were fabricated by Lu et al. [27] via DLP. In their study, murine-bone-marrow-derived cells were successfully encapsulated in the construct. A complex porous scaffold was fabricated by Gauvin et al. [28]. The hydrogel scaffold uses gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) as the building material. By varying the structure and the prepolymer concentration, the mechanical properties of scaffolds can be tuned. Furthermore, the interconnected pores allow for uniform distribution of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). As a result, scaffolds with high cell density and homogeneous cell distribution can be generated at the end of the culture period.Fig. 4


Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

Wu GH, Hsu SH - J Med Biol Eng (2015)

Scheme of digital light processing (DLP). Digital mirror device is used in process to illuminate entire layer of resin surface
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491116&req=5

Fig4: Scheme of digital light processing (DLP). Digital mirror device is used in process to illuminate entire layer of resin surface
Mentions: Digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing uses a laser to cure a polymer. A scheme of DLP is shown in Fig. 4. Compared to SLA, which is a bottom-up process, DLP is a top-down process and is relatively faster. During the process, a digital mirror device (DMD) is used to control the curing laser beam. DMD has an array of micro-mirrors, which can rotate independently to control the laser beam to an on or off state. With the use of DMD, an entire layer can be cured at once, which makes DLP faster than the conventional SLA process. For tissue engineering, PEGDA hydrogel scaffolds were fabricated by Lu et al. [27] via DLP. In their study, murine-bone-marrow-derived cells were successfully encapsulated in the construct. A complex porous scaffold was fabricated by Gauvin et al. [28]. The hydrogel scaffold uses gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) as the building material. By varying the structure and the prepolymer concentration, the mechanical properties of scaffolds can be tuned. Furthermore, the interconnected pores allow for uniform distribution of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). As a result, scaffolds with high cell density and homogeneous cell distribution can be generated at the end of the culture period.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography.There are advantages and limitations for each method.Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT

Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.