Limits...
Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

Wu GH, Hsu SH - J Med Biol Eng (2015)

Bottom Line: Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography.There are advantages and limitations for each method.Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT

Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme of stereolithography (SLA). Single laser beam scans surface of resin to polymerize or crosslink polymer resin
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491116&req=5

Fig3: Scheme of stereolithography (SLA). Single laser beam scans surface of resin to polymerize or crosslink polymer resin

Mentions: Stereolithography (SLA) employs a single beam laser to polymerize or crosslink a photopolymer resin. A scheme of SLA is shown in Fig. 3. By drawing on the liquid photopolymer resin with a light beam, thin layers of polymer are stacked layer by layer. A mixture of diethyl fumarate (DEF)/poly(propylene fumarate) (PFF) was used by Cooke et al. [20] to fabricate a scaffold. An 80-layer scaffold with a 4-mm thickness was fabricated using SLA. Holes and slots of various sizes were made on the scaffold. Protrusions were also made on the scaffold, which demonstrated the ability of SLA to build scaffolds various geometries. Melchels et al. [21] prepared a mathematically defined scaffold. The porous scaffold was built with two kinds of resin, either a PLA-based resin or a poly(d,l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)-based resin. By changing the pore size, resin selection, and pore architecture, the mechanical properties of the scaffold may be manipulated. Flexible and elastic materials could also be crafted into scaffolds via SLA. Schüller-Ravoo et al. used poly(trimethylene carbonate)-based resin to build scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering [22]. When the scaffolds were seeded with bovine chondrocytes, glycosaminoglycans and fibrillar collagens were deposited after 6 weeks of culture. The resulting scaffolds presented a 50 % increase in compressive modulus.Fig. 3


Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

Wu GH, Hsu SH - J Med Biol Eng (2015)

Scheme of stereolithography (SLA). Single laser beam scans surface of resin to polymerize or crosslink polymer resin
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491116&req=5

Fig3: Scheme of stereolithography (SLA). Single laser beam scans surface of resin to polymerize or crosslink polymer resin
Mentions: Stereolithography (SLA) employs a single beam laser to polymerize or crosslink a photopolymer resin. A scheme of SLA is shown in Fig. 3. By drawing on the liquid photopolymer resin with a light beam, thin layers of polymer are stacked layer by layer. A mixture of diethyl fumarate (DEF)/poly(propylene fumarate) (PFF) was used by Cooke et al. [20] to fabricate a scaffold. An 80-layer scaffold with a 4-mm thickness was fabricated using SLA. Holes and slots of various sizes were made on the scaffold. Protrusions were also made on the scaffold, which demonstrated the ability of SLA to build scaffolds various geometries. Melchels et al. [21] prepared a mathematically defined scaffold. The porous scaffold was built with two kinds of resin, either a PLA-based resin or a poly(d,l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)-based resin. By changing the pore size, resin selection, and pore architecture, the mechanical properties of the scaffold may be manipulated. Flexible and elastic materials could also be crafted into scaffolds via SLA. Schüller-Ravoo et al. used poly(trimethylene carbonate)-based resin to build scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering [22]. When the scaffolds were seeded with bovine chondrocytes, glycosaminoglycans and fibrillar collagens were deposited after 6 weeks of culture. The resulting scaffolds presented a 50 % increase in compressive modulus.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography.There are advantages and limitations for each method.Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT

Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.