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Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

Wu GH, Hsu SH - J Med Biol Eng (2015)

Bottom Line: Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography.There are advantages and limitations for each method.Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT

Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme of liquid-frozen deposition manufacturing (LFDM). Low-temperature working chamber/platform is required in process
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Fig2: Scheme of liquid-frozen deposition manufacturing (LFDM). Low-temperature working chamber/platform is required in process

Mentions: There are some drawbacks to FDM. During the process, the use of heat as the power source to melt the material can have undesired effects. The operating temperature of the system is too high for cells and other biomolecules. With this limitation, cells are hardly printed together with the material to form a cell-containing scaffold, and it is also difficult to incorporate biomolecules such as growth factors into the scaffold. To overcome the limitations associated with FDM, a lower-temperature cooling platform, called liquid frozen deposition manufacturing (LFDM), was developed. A scheme of LFDM is shown in Fig. 2. A low-temperature platform/chamber is required for the process.Fig. 2


Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

Wu GH, Hsu SH - J Med Biol Eng (2015)

Scheme of liquid-frozen deposition manufacturing (LFDM). Low-temperature working chamber/platform is required in process
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4491116&req=5

Fig2: Scheme of liquid-frozen deposition manufacturing (LFDM). Low-temperature working chamber/platform is required in process
Mentions: There are some drawbacks to FDM. During the process, the use of heat as the power source to melt the material can have undesired effects. The operating temperature of the system is too high for cells and other biomolecules. With this limitation, cells are hardly printed together with the material to form a cell-containing scaffold, and it is also difficult to incorporate biomolecules such as growth factors into the scaffold. To overcome the limitations associated with FDM, a lower-temperature cooling platform, called liquid frozen deposition manufacturing (LFDM), was developed. A scheme of LFDM is shown in Fig. 2. A low-temperature platform/chamber is required for the process.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography.There are advantages and limitations for each method.Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT

Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.