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Negative-pressure wound therapy for management of diabetic foot wounds: a review of the mechanism of action, clinical applications, and recent developments.

Hasan MY, Teo R, Nather A - Diabet Foot Ankle (2015)

Bottom Line: However, a successful outcome in this subgroup of diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary approach with careful patient selection, appropriate surgical debridement, targeted antibiotic therapy, and optimization of healing markers.Evolving NPWT technology including instillation therapy, nanocrystalline adjuncts, and portable systems can further improve results if used with correct indications.This review article summarizes current knowledge about the role of NPWT in the management of the diabetic foot and its mode of action, clinical applications, and recent developments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Foot and Ankle, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, National University Hospital, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) plays an important role in the treatment of complex wounds. Its effect on limb salvage in the management of the diabetic foot is well described in the literature. However, a successful outcome in this subgroup of diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary approach with careful patient selection, appropriate surgical debridement, targeted antibiotic therapy, and optimization of healing markers. Evolving NPWT technology including instillation therapy, nanocrystalline adjuncts, and portable systems can further improve results if used with correct indications. This review article summarizes current knowledge about the role of NPWT in the management of the diabetic foot and its mode of action, clinical applications, and recent developments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Application of NPWT dressing.
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Figure 0002: Application of NPWT dressing.

Mentions: NPWT device is applied on the wound in a standard manner (Fig. 2).


Negative-pressure wound therapy for management of diabetic foot wounds: a review of the mechanism of action, clinical applications, and recent developments.

Hasan MY, Teo R, Nather A - Diabet Foot Ankle (2015)

Application of NPWT dressing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490797&req=5

Figure 0002: Application of NPWT dressing.
Mentions: NPWT device is applied on the wound in a standard manner (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: However, a successful outcome in this subgroup of diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary approach with careful patient selection, appropriate surgical debridement, targeted antibiotic therapy, and optimization of healing markers.Evolving NPWT technology including instillation therapy, nanocrystalline adjuncts, and portable systems can further improve results if used with correct indications.This review article summarizes current knowledge about the role of NPWT in the management of the diabetic foot and its mode of action, clinical applications, and recent developments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Foot and Ankle, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, National University Hospital, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) plays an important role in the treatment of complex wounds. Its effect on limb salvage in the management of the diabetic foot is well described in the literature. However, a successful outcome in this subgroup of diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary approach with careful patient selection, appropriate surgical debridement, targeted antibiotic therapy, and optimization of healing markers. Evolving NPWT technology including instillation therapy, nanocrystalline adjuncts, and portable systems can further improve results if used with correct indications. This review article summarizes current knowledge about the role of NPWT in the management of the diabetic foot and its mode of action, clinical applications, and recent developments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus