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Analysis of the talocrural and subtalar joint motions in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome.

Akiyama K, Noh B, Fukano M, Miyakawa S, Hirose N, Fukubayashi T - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Bottom Line: A significantly larger range of internal/external rotation and inversion/eversion motion was observed in the subtalar joint of MTSS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05) from heel contact to heel off.Our results indicate that the range of subtalar joint motion is greater in patients with MTSS during the stance phase of the forward step.The kinematic results obtained of this study may have important clinical implications and add quantitative data to an in vivo database of MTSS patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 Japan ; Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Sports Science, 3-15-1, Nishigaoka, Kita-ku 115-0056 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The rearfoot motion during sports activities in patients with the medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the difference in kinematics of the rearfoot in MTSS patients (eight male soccer players) and control participants (eight male soccer players) during a forward step.

Methods: Sixteen male soccer players, including eight players with MTSS, participated. Forward step trials were recorded with cineradiographic images obtained at a sampling rate of 60 Hz. Geometric bone models of the tibia and talus/calcaneus were created from computed tomography scans of the distal part of one lower limb. Following a combination of approaches, anatomical coordinate systems were embedded in each bone model. The talocrural joint motion (relative motion of the talus with respect to the tibia) and subtalar joint motion (relative motion of the calcaneus with respect to the talus) were examined.

Results: A significantly larger range of internal/external rotation and inversion/eversion motion was observed in the subtalar joint of MTSS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05) from heel contact to heel off. There were no significant differences between the MTSS patients and healthy participants in the ranges of all talocrural joint angles during the forward step.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that the range of subtalar joint motion is greater in patients with MTSS during the stance phase of the forward step. The kinematic results obtained of this study may have important clinical implications and add quantitative data to an in vivo database of MTSS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An example of the geometric bone model. (a: tibia, b: talus, c: calcaneus) After geometric bone models of the tibia and talus/calcaneus were created from computed tomography scans, 3D bone model anatomical coordinate systems were set
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Fig2: An example of the geometric bone model. (a: tibia, b: talus, c: calcaneus) After geometric bone models of the tibia and talus/calcaneus were created from computed tomography scans, 3D bone model anatomical coordinate systems were set

Mentions: 3D bone model anatomical coordinate systems were set (Geomagic Studio, 3D Systems, Rock Hill, SC, USA) following a combination of previously reported approaches (Fig. 2a, b, c) [27]. The axis of the tibia was defined as follows. The origin of the tibia was the flat center of the tibial plafond. The anteroposterior axis was defined as an orthogonal line to the anterior edge line of the tibial plafond passing through the origin. The superoinferior axis was defined as a line connecting the medial-lateral and anteroposterior center points of the distal tibial shaft at 5 and 10 cm above the joint surface, passing through the origin. The Z-axis was defined as a line perpendicular to the X- and Y-axes (Fig. 2a). The axis of the talus was defined as follows. A circle on the sagittal plane fit to two midpoints (the midpoint of the anteromedial and anterolateral edges and the midpoint of posteromedial and posterolateral edges of the trochlea tali) was defined. The origin of the talus was defined as the centre of the circle. The Z-axis was defined as a perpendicular line to the circle, passing through the origin. The Y-axis was defined as a line passing through the origin and circle at the highest point of the tibial tali. The X-axis was the cross product of the Y and Z-axes (Fig. 2b). The axis of the calcaneus was defined as follows. The origin was the center of a line connecting the most lateral point of the middle talar articular surface and posterior talar articular surface. The X-axis was a line parallel to the inferior calcaneus, passing through the origin. The Y-axis was a line parallel to the lateral wall of the calcaneus and perpendicular to the X-axis, passing through the origin. The Z-axis was the cross product of the X- and Y-axes (Fig. 2c). The angle of the rearfoot relative to the tibia, and the tibia relative to the laboratory coordinate system, were calculated according to Grood and Suntay [28].Fig. 2


Analysis of the talocrural and subtalar joint motions in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome.

Akiyama K, Noh B, Fukano M, Miyakawa S, Hirose N, Fukubayashi T - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

An example of the geometric bone model. (a: tibia, b: talus, c: calcaneus) After geometric bone models of the tibia and talus/calcaneus were created from computed tomography scans, 3D bone model anatomical coordinate systems were set
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490758&req=5

Fig2: An example of the geometric bone model. (a: tibia, b: talus, c: calcaneus) After geometric bone models of the tibia and talus/calcaneus were created from computed tomography scans, 3D bone model anatomical coordinate systems were set
Mentions: 3D bone model anatomical coordinate systems were set (Geomagic Studio, 3D Systems, Rock Hill, SC, USA) following a combination of previously reported approaches (Fig. 2a, b, c) [27]. The axis of the tibia was defined as follows. The origin of the tibia was the flat center of the tibial plafond. The anteroposterior axis was defined as an orthogonal line to the anterior edge line of the tibial plafond passing through the origin. The superoinferior axis was defined as a line connecting the medial-lateral and anteroposterior center points of the distal tibial shaft at 5 and 10 cm above the joint surface, passing through the origin. The Z-axis was defined as a line perpendicular to the X- and Y-axes (Fig. 2a). The axis of the talus was defined as follows. A circle on the sagittal plane fit to two midpoints (the midpoint of the anteromedial and anterolateral edges and the midpoint of posteromedial and posterolateral edges of the trochlea tali) was defined. The origin of the talus was defined as the centre of the circle. The Z-axis was defined as a perpendicular line to the circle, passing through the origin. The Y-axis was defined as a line passing through the origin and circle at the highest point of the tibial tali. The X-axis was the cross product of the Y and Z-axes (Fig. 2b). The axis of the calcaneus was defined as follows. The origin was the center of a line connecting the most lateral point of the middle talar articular surface and posterior talar articular surface. The X-axis was a line parallel to the inferior calcaneus, passing through the origin. The Y-axis was a line parallel to the lateral wall of the calcaneus and perpendicular to the X-axis, passing through the origin. The Z-axis was the cross product of the X- and Y-axes (Fig. 2c). The angle of the rearfoot relative to the tibia, and the tibia relative to the laboratory coordinate system, were calculated according to Grood and Suntay [28].Fig. 2

Bottom Line: A significantly larger range of internal/external rotation and inversion/eversion motion was observed in the subtalar joint of MTSS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05) from heel contact to heel off.Our results indicate that the range of subtalar joint motion is greater in patients with MTSS during the stance phase of the forward step.The kinematic results obtained of this study may have important clinical implications and add quantitative data to an in vivo database of MTSS patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 Japan ; Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Sports Science, 3-15-1, Nishigaoka, Kita-ku 115-0056 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The rearfoot motion during sports activities in patients with the medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the difference in kinematics of the rearfoot in MTSS patients (eight male soccer players) and control participants (eight male soccer players) during a forward step.

Methods: Sixteen male soccer players, including eight players with MTSS, participated. Forward step trials were recorded with cineradiographic images obtained at a sampling rate of 60 Hz. Geometric bone models of the tibia and talus/calcaneus were created from computed tomography scans of the distal part of one lower limb. Following a combination of approaches, anatomical coordinate systems were embedded in each bone model. The talocrural joint motion (relative motion of the talus with respect to the tibia) and subtalar joint motion (relative motion of the calcaneus with respect to the talus) were examined.

Results: A significantly larger range of internal/external rotation and inversion/eversion motion was observed in the subtalar joint of MTSS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05) from heel contact to heel off. There were no significant differences between the MTSS patients and healthy participants in the ranges of all talocrural joint angles during the forward step.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that the range of subtalar joint motion is greater in patients with MTSS during the stance phase of the forward step. The kinematic results obtained of this study may have important clinical implications and add quantitative data to an in vivo database of MTSS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus