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Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience.

Vixner L, Mårtensson LB, Schytt E - BMC Complement Altern Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Questionnaires were administered the day after partus and 2 months later.Two months postpartum, the mean recalled pain on the visual analogue scale (SC: 70.1, MA: 69.3 and EA: 68.7) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted mean difference 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.3 to 7.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 1.3 CI 95% -5.5 to 8.1).Positive birth experience (SC: 54.3%, MA: 64.6% and EA: 61.0%) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 1.8, CI 95% 0.9 to 3.7 and SC vs EA: OR 1.4 CI 95% 0.7 to 2.6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 13A, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. lvi@du.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: In a previous randomised controlled trial we showed that acupuncture with a combination of manual- and electrical stimulation (EA) did not affect the level of pain, as compared with acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA) and standard care (SC), but reduced the need for other forms of pain relief, including epidural analgesia. To dismiss an under-treatment of pain in the trial, we did a long-term follow up on the recollection of labour pain and the birth experience comparing acupuncture with manual stimulation, acupuncture with combined electrical and manual stimulation with standard care. Our hypothesis was that despite the lower frequency of use of other pain relief, women who had received EA would make similar retrospective assessments of labour pain and the birth experience 2 months after birth as women who received standard care (SC) or acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA).

Methods: Secondary analyses of data collected for a randomised controlled trial conducted at two delivery wards in Sweden. A total of 303 iparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 min of MA or EA, or SC without acupuncture. Questionnaires were administered the day after partus and 2 months later.

Results: Two months postpartum, the mean recalled pain on the visual analogue scale (SC: 70.1, MA: 69.3 and EA: 68.7) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted mean difference 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.3 to 7.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 1.3 CI 95% -5.5 to 8.1). Positive birth experience (SC: 54.3%, MA: 64.6% and EA: 61.0%) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 1.8, CI 95% 0.9 to 3.7 and SC vs EA: OR 1.4 CI 95% 0.7 to 2.6).

Conclusions: Despite the lower use of other pain relief, women who received acupuncture with the combination of manual and electrical stimulation during labour made the same retrospective assessments of labour pain and birth experience 2 months postpartum as those who received acupuncture with manual stimulation or standard care.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01197950.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of the study participants. MA = Manual acupuncture. EA = Electro-acupuncture. SC = Standard Care. ITT = Intention to treat
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Fig1: Flow chart of the study participants. MA = Manual acupuncture. EA = Electro-acupuncture. SC = Standard Care. ITT = Intention to treat

Mentions: Recruitment and participation are presented in Fig. 1. Approximately 4300 women were eligible, 679 were informed and asked to participate in the study. A total of 303 consented to participate. The interventions were given to 253 women; MA 83, EA 87, and SC 83. The questionnaire 2 months postpartum was completed by 67 women in the MA group (81 %), 78 in the EA group (90 %), and 72 in the SC group (87 %). The mean number of days after birth for responding to the questionnaire was: MA 65.7 (SD 11.7), EA 68.3 (SD 17.5), and SC 69.2 (SD 14.5). There were no differences between the groups regarding Apgar score <7 at 5 min, transfer to neonatal intensive care unit or umbilical cord pH (Table 1).Fig. 1


Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience.

Vixner L, Mårtensson LB, Schytt E - BMC Complement Altern Med (2015)

Flow chart of the study participants. MA = Manual acupuncture. EA = Electro-acupuncture. SC = Standard Care. ITT = Intention to treat
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490752&req=5

Fig1: Flow chart of the study participants. MA = Manual acupuncture. EA = Electro-acupuncture. SC = Standard Care. ITT = Intention to treat
Mentions: Recruitment and participation are presented in Fig. 1. Approximately 4300 women were eligible, 679 were informed and asked to participate in the study. A total of 303 consented to participate. The interventions were given to 253 women; MA 83, EA 87, and SC 83. The questionnaire 2 months postpartum was completed by 67 women in the MA group (81 %), 78 in the EA group (90 %), and 72 in the SC group (87 %). The mean number of days after birth for responding to the questionnaire was: MA 65.7 (SD 11.7), EA 68.3 (SD 17.5), and SC 69.2 (SD 14.5). There were no differences between the groups regarding Apgar score <7 at 5 min, transfer to neonatal intensive care unit or umbilical cord pH (Table 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Questionnaires were administered the day after partus and 2 months later.Two months postpartum, the mean recalled pain on the visual analogue scale (SC: 70.1, MA: 69.3 and EA: 68.7) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted mean difference 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.3 to 7.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 1.3 CI 95% -5.5 to 8.1).Positive birth experience (SC: 54.3%, MA: 64.6% and EA: 61.0%) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 1.8, CI 95% 0.9 to 3.7 and SC vs EA: OR 1.4 CI 95% 0.7 to 2.6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 13A, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. lvi@du.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: In a previous randomised controlled trial we showed that acupuncture with a combination of manual- and electrical stimulation (EA) did not affect the level of pain, as compared with acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA) and standard care (SC), but reduced the need for other forms of pain relief, including epidural analgesia. To dismiss an under-treatment of pain in the trial, we did a long-term follow up on the recollection of labour pain and the birth experience comparing acupuncture with manual stimulation, acupuncture with combined electrical and manual stimulation with standard care. Our hypothesis was that despite the lower frequency of use of other pain relief, women who had received EA would make similar retrospective assessments of labour pain and the birth experience 2 months after birth as women who received standard care (SC) or acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA).

Methods: Secondary analyses of data collected for a randomised controlled trial conducted at two delivery wards in Sweden. A total of 303 iparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 min of MA or EA, or SC without acupuncture. Questionnaires were administered the day after partus and 2 months later.

Results: Two months postpartum, the mean recalled pain on the visual analogue scale (SC: 70.1, MA: 69.3 and EA: 68.7) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted mean difference 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.3 to 7.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 1.3 CI 95% -5.5 to 8.1). Positive birth experience (SC: 54.3%, MA: 64.6% and EA: 61.0%) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 1.8, CI 95% 0.9 to 3.7 and SC vs EA: OR 1.4 CI 95% 0.7 to 2.6).

Conclusions: Despite the lower use of other pain relief, women who received acupuncture with the combination of manual and electrical stimulation during labour made the same retrospective assessments of labour pain and birth experience 2 months postpartum as those who received acupuncture with manual stimulation or standard care.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01197950.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus