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Comparison of Selective Laser Melted Titanium and Magnesium Implants Coated with PCL.

Matena J, Petersen S, Gieseke M, Teske M, Beyerbach M, Kampmann A, Murua Escobar H, Gellrich NC, Haferkamp H, Nolte I - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The SLM produced magnesium was compared with the titanium alloy TiAl6V4, as titanium is already established for the SLM-process.For testing the biocompatibility, we used primary murine osteoblasts.Results showed a reduced corrosion rate and good biocompatibility of the SLM produced magnesium with PCL coating.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, D-30559 Hannover, Germany. julia.matena@tiho-hannover.de.

ABSTRACT
Degradable implant material for bone remodeling that corresponds to the physiological stability of bone has still not been developed. Promising degradable materials with good mechanical properties are magnesium and magnesium alloys. However, excessive gas production due to corrosion can lower the biocompatibility. In the present study we used the polymer coating polycaprolactone (PCL), intended to lower the corrosion rate of magnesium. Additionally, improvement of implant geometry can increase bone remodeling. Porous structures are known to support vessel ingrowth and thus increase osseointegration. With the selective laser melting (SLM) process, defined open porous structures can be created. Recently, highly reactive magnesium has also been processed by SLM. We performed studies with a flat magnesium layer and with porous magnesium implants coated with polymers. The SLM produced magnesium was compared with the titanium alloy TiAl6V4, as titanium is already established for the SLM-process. For testing the biocompatibility, we used primary murine osteoblasts. Results showed a reduced corrosion rate and good biocompatibility of the SLM produced magnesium with PCL coating.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Corrosion-induced mass loss of non-coated and PCL-coated magnesium structures (A) and pH-value of surrounding medium (B) in Sørensen buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) at 37 °C. Data shown as means ± SD.
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ijms-16-13287-f003: Corrosion-induced mass loss of non-coated and PCL-coated magnesium structures (A) and pH-value of surrounding medium (B) in Sørensen buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) at 37 °C. Data shown as means ± SD.

Mentions: This observation could be confirmed by means of mass development analysis. The non-coated structures lost up to 2% of the initial total mass (SLM processed magnesium structure and titanium base structure), whereas the PCL-coated samples seemed to gain in mass (Figure 2F–H; Figure 3A).


Comparison of Selective Laser Melted Titanium and Magnesium Implants Coated with PCL.

Matena J, Petersen S, Gieseke M, Teske M, Beyerbach M, Kampmann A, Murua Escobar H, Gellrich NC, Haferkamp H, Nolte I - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Corrosion-induced mass loss of non-coated and PCL-coated magnesium structures (A) and pH-value of surrounding medium (B) in Sørensen buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) at 37 °C. Data shown as means ± SD.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490495&req=5

ijms-16-13287-f003: Corrosion-induced mass loss of non-coated and PCL-coated magnesium structures (A) and pH-value of surrounding medium (B) in Sørensen buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) at 37 °C. Data shown as means ± SD.
Mentions: This observation could be confirmed by means of mass development analysis. The non-coated structures lost up to 2% of the initial total mass (SLM processed magnesium structure and titanium base structure), whereas the PCL-coated samples seemed to gain in mass (Figure 2F–H; Figure 3A).

Bottom Line: The SLM produced magnesium was compared with the titanium alloy TiAl6V4, as titanium is already established for the SLM-process.For testing the biocompatibility, we used primary murine osteoblasts.Results showed a reduced corrosion rate and good biocompatibility of the SLM produced magnesium with PCL coating.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, D-30559 Hannover, Germany. julia.matena@tiho-hannover.de.

ABSTRACT
Degradable implant material for bone remodeling that corresponds to the physiological stability of bone has still not been developed. Promising degradable materials with good mechanical properties are magnesium and magnesium alloys. However, excessive gas production due to corrosion can lower the biocompatibility. In the present study we used the polymer coating polycaprolactone (PCL), intended to lower the corrosion rate of magnesium. Additionally, improvement of implant geometry can increase bone remodeling. Porous structures are known to support vessel ingrowth and thus increase osseointegration. With the selective laser melting (SLM) process, defined open porous structures can be created. Recently, highly reactive magnesium has also been processed by SLM. We performed studies with a flat magnesium layer and with porous magnesium implants coated with polymers. The SLM produced magnesium was compared with the titanium alloy TiAl6V4, as titanium is already established for the SLM-process. For testing the biocompatibility, we used primary murine osteoblasts. Results showed a reduced corrosion rate and good biocompatibility of the SLM produced magnesium with PCL coating.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus