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Genome-Wide Analysis of Sorbitol Dehydrogenase (SDH) Genes and Their Differential Expression in Two Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) Fruits.

Dai M, Shi Z, Xu C - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Tissue-specific expression of these six members was observed in nine tissues or organs of sand pear, with the greatest abundance found in functional leaf petioles, followed by the flesh of young fruit.The transcript abundance of PpySDHs was higher in "Cuiguan" than in "Cuiyu", accompanied by a higher content of sugars and higher ratio of fructose to sorbitol maintained in the former cultivar at harvest.In conclusion, it was suggested that multiple members of the SDH gene family are possibly involved in sand pear fruit development and sugar accumulation and may affect both the sugar amount and sugar composition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Integrative Biology, State Agriculture Ministry Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Growth, Development and Quality Improvement, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058, China. daimeisong@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Through RNA-seq of a mixed fruit sample, fourteen expressed sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) genes have been identified from sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai). Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these PpySDHs with those from other plants supported the closest relationship of sand pear with Chinese white pear (P. bretschneideri). The expression levels varied greatly among members, and the strongest six (PpySDH2, PpySDH4, PpySDH8, PpySDH12, PpySDH13 and PpySDH14) accounted for 96% of total transcript abundance of PpySDHs. Tissue-specific expression of these six members was observed in nine tissues or organs of sand pear, with the greatest abundance found in functional leaf petioles, followed by the flesh of young fruit. Expression patterns of these six PpySDH genes during fruit development were analyzed in two sand pear cultivars, "Cuiguan" and "Cuiyu". Overall, expression of PpySDHs peaked twice, first at the fruitlet stage and again at or near harvest. The transcript abundance of PpySDHs was higher in "Cuiguan" than in "Cuiyu", accompanied by a higher content of sugars and higher ratio of fructose to sorbitol maintained in the former cultivar at harvest. In conclusion, it was suggested that multiple members of the SDH gene family are possibly involved in sand pear fruit development and sugar accumulation and may affect both the sugar amount and sugar composition.

No MeSH data available.


Species tree of seven Rosaceae species and five non-Rosaceae plant species. The protein sequences of different species were first grouped by using OrthoMCL, then sequences in each group were aligned by using Muscle. The tree was constructed by using Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6 (MEGA6) [19] following the ML (maximum likelihood) statistical method and the LG (Le and Gascuel) with Freqs. (+F) amino acid model. The bootstrap method was used to test the phylogeny (500 replications).
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ijms-16-13065-f002: Species tree of seven Rosaceae species and five non-Rosaceae plant species. The protein sequences of different species were first grouped by using OrthoMCL, then sequences in each group were aligned by using Muscle. The tree was constructed by using Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6 (MEGA6) [19] following the ML (maximum likelihood) statistical method and the LG (Le and Gascuel) with Freqs. (+F) amino acid model. The bootstrap method was used to test the phylogeny (500 replications).

Mentions: From species phylogeny (Figure 2), it can be concluded that the SDH genes among Pyrus and Malus species were closely related, with the closest relationship between P. pyrifolia and P. bretschneideri genes.


Genome-Wide Analysis of Sorbitol Dehydrogenase (SDH) Genes and Their Differential Expression in Two Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) Fruits.

Dai M, Shi Z, Xu C - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Species tree of seven Rosaceae species and five non-Rosaceae plant species. The protein sequences of different species were first grouped by using OrthoMCL, then sequences in each group were aligned by using Muscle. The tree was constructed by using Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6 (MEGA6) [19] following the ML (maximum likelihood) statistical method and the LG (Le and Gascuel) with Freqs. (+F) amino acid model. The bootstrap method was used to test the phylogeny (500 replications).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490486&req=5

ijms-16-13065-f002: Species tree of seven Rosaceae species and five non-Rosaceae plant species. The protein sequences of different species were first grouped by using OrthoMCL, then sequences in each group were aligned by using Muscle. The tree was constructed by using Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6 (MEGA6) [19] following the ML (maximum likelihood) statistical method and the LG (Le and Gascuel) with Freqs. (+F) amino acid model. The bootstrap method was used to test the phylogeny (500 replications).
Mentions: From species phylogeny (Figure 2), it can be concluded that the SDH genes among Pyrus and Malus species were closely related, with the closest relationship between P. pyrifolia and P. bretschneideri genes.

Bottom Line: Tissue-specific expression of these six members was observed in nine tissues or organs of sand pear, with the greatest abundance found in functional leaf petioles, followed by the flesh of young fruit.The transcript abundance of PpySDHs was higher in "Cuiguan" than in "Cuiyu", accompanied by a higher content of sugars and higher ratio of fructose to sorbitol maintained in the former cultivar at harvest.In conclusion, it was suggested that multiple members of the SDH gene family are possibly involved in sand pear fruit development and sugar accumulation and may affect both the sugar amount and sugar composition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Integrative Biology, State Agriculture Ministry Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Growth, Development and Quality Improvement, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Hangzhou 310058, China. daimeisong@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Through RNA-seq of a mixed fruit sample, fourteen expressed sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) genes have been identified from sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai). Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these PpySDHs with those from other plants supported the closest relationship of sand pear with Chinese white pear (P. bretschneideri). The expression levels varied greatly among members, and the strongest six (PpySDH2, PpySDH4, PpySDH8, PpySDH12, PpySDH13 and PpySDH14) accounted for 96% of total transcript abundance of PpySDHs. Tissue-specific expression of these six members was observed in nine tissues or organs of sand pear, with the greatest abundance found in functional leaf petioles, followed by the flesh of young fruit. Expression patterns of these six PpySDH genes during fruit development were analyzed in two sand pear cultivars, "Cuiguan" and "Cuiyu". Overall, expression of PpySDHs peaked twice, first at the fruitlet stage and again at or near harvest. The transcript abundance of PpySDHs was higher in "Cuiguan" than in "Cuiyu", accompanied by a higher content of sugars and higher ratio of fructose to sorbitol maintained in the former cultivar at harvest. In conclusion, it was suggested that multiple members of the SDH gene family are possibly involved in sand pear fruit development and sugar accumulation and may affect both the sugar amount and sugar composition.

No MeSH data available.