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Induction of Apoptosis in Endometrial Cancer (Ishikawa) Cells by Pogostemon cablin Aqueous Extract (PCAE).

Tsai CC, Chang YH, Chang CC, Cheng YM, Ou YC, Chien CC, Hsu YC - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Gene expression profiling (GEP) results further suggest that, in addition to its known effects with regard to EC prevention, PCAE may also exert antitumor activity on established EC cells.Many previous studies have identified the chemo-preventive effects of natural plant materials and the potential role of these materials in chemotherapy.This current study used human EC Ishikawa cells to investigate the anti-tumor effects of PCAE in EC cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan. nick@adm.cgmh.org.tw.

ABSTRACT
Pogostemon cablin (PC) is a traditional herbal medicine used in the treatment of the common cold, nausea, diarrhea, and even for headaches and fever. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative activity of PC in endometrial cancer (EC) cells have yet to be fully elucidated. This study investigated the anticancer effects of an aqueous extract of Pogostemon cablin (PCAE), specifically induced apoptosis in EC (Ishikawa) cells. Proliferation of EC cells following exposure to PCAE was assessed by an MTT assay. DNA content and the induction of cell cycle apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry (FACS Calibur). Protein caspase-3 and, -9 as well as AIF were investigated using Western blot. Our results demonstrate growth inhibition of Ishikawa cells by PCAE. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity caused PCAE-treated cell lines to accumulate in apoptosis. Gene expression profiling (GEP) results further suggest that, in addition to its known effects with regard to EC prevention, PCAE may also exert antitumor activity on established EC cells. Many previous studies have identified the chemo-preventive effects of natural plant materials and the potential role of these materials in chemotherapy. This current study used human EC Ishikawa cells to investigate the anti-tumor effects of PCAE in EC cells. Our results demonstrate that PCAE inhibits the growth of cancer cells and induces apoptosis, which suggests the potential applicability of PCAE as an antitumor agent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The focused panel gene expression profile of Ishikawa cells was studied using the RT2 ProfilterTM PCR array following four-hour exposure to vehicle (DMSO) or PCAE 2 mg/mL. Fold changes greater than two (up-regulation) or smaller than 0.5 (down-regulation) were considered substantial. Fold changes were calculated by dividing expression levels in PCAE-treated cells by expression levels in the vehicle-treated cells. BAG3: BCL-associated athanogene 3; CASP4: Caspase 4, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP5: Caspase 5, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; HRK: Harakiri, BCL2 interacting protein; BCL2A1: BCL2-related protein A1; CASP1: Caspase 1, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP14: Caspase 14, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase, NOL3: Nuclear protein 3; PYCARD: PYD and CARD domain containing; TNF: Tumor necrosis factor, TNFRSF10A: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10a; CD27: CD27 molecule, TNFSF10: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10; TP73: Tumor protein p73.
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ijms-16-12424-f004: The focused panel gene expression profile of Ishikawa cells was studied using the RT2 ProfilterTM PCR array following four-hour exposure to vehicle (DMSO) or PCAE 2 mg/mL. Fold changes greater than two (up-regulation) or smaller than 0.5 (down-regulation) were considered substantial. Fold changes were calculated by dividing expression levels in PCAE-treated cells by expression levels in the vehicle-treated cells. BAG3: BCL-associated athanogene 3; CASP4: Caspase 4, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP5: Caspase 5, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; HRK: Harakiri, BCL2 interacting protein; BCL2A1: BCL2-related protein A1; CASP1: Caspase 1, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP14: Caspase 14, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase, NOL3: Nuclear protein 3; PYCARD: PYD and CARD domain containing; TNF: Tumor necrosis factor, TNFRSF10A: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10a; CD27: CD27 molecule, TNFSF10: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10; TP73: Tumor protein p73.

Mentions: Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the PCR-array data derived from PCAE-treated cells and DMSO-treated cells constituted two spatially-separated planes. This suggests that treatment with PCAE had a far greater impact on the gene expression profile than could be reasonably attributed to technical errors. We therefore divided the expression levels in PCAE-treated cells by those of the vehicle-treated cells and considered changes greater than two-fold to be substantial up-regulation and changes smaller than 0.5-fold to be down-regulation (Figure 4).


Induction of Apoptosis in Endometrial Cancer (Ishikawa) Cells by Pogostemon cablin Aqueous Extract (PCAE).

Tsai CC, Chang YH, Chang CC, Cheng YM, Ou YC, Chien CC, Hsu YC - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

The focused panel gene expression profile of Ishikawa cells was studied using the RT2 ProfilterTM PCR array following four-hour exposure to vehicle (DMSO) or PCAE 2 mg/mL. Fold changes greater than two (up-regulation) or smaller than 0.5 (down-regulation) were considered substantial. Fold changes were calculated by dividing expression levels in PCAE-treated cells by expression levels in the vehicle-treated cells. BAG3: BCL-associated athanogene 3; CASP4: Caspase 4, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP5: Caspase 5, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; HRK: Harakiri, BCL2 interacting protein; BCL2A1: BCL2-related protein A1; CASP1: Caspase 1, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP14: Caspase 14, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase, NOL3: Nuclear protein 3; PYCARD: PYD and CARD domain containing; TNF: Tumor necrosis factor, TNFRSF10A: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10a; CD27: CD27 molecule, TNFSF10: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10; TP73: Tumor protein p73.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490452&req=5

ijms-16-12424-f004: The focused panel gene expression profile of Ishikawa cells was studied using the RT2 ProfilterTM PCR array following four-hour exposure to vehicle (DMSO) or PCAE 2 mg/mL. Fold changes greater than two (up-regulation) or smaller than 0.5 (down-regulation) were considered substantial. Fold changes were calculated by dividing expression levels in PCAE-treated cells by expression levels in the vehicle-treated cells. BAG3: BCL-associated athanogene 3; CASP4: Caspase 4, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP5: Caspase 5, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; HRK: Harakiri, BCL2 interacting protein; BCL2A1: BCL2-related protein A1; CASP1: Caspase 1, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase; CASP14: Caspase 14, apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase, NOL3: Nuclear protein 3; PYCARD: PYD and CARD domain containing; TNF: Tumor necrosis factor, TNFRSF10A: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10a; CD27: CD27 molecule, TNFSF10: Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10; TP73: Tumor protein p73.
Mentions: Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the PCR-array data derived from PCAE-treated cells and DMSO-treated cells constituted two spatially-separated planes. This suggests that treatment with PCAE had a far greater impact on the gene expression profile than could be reasonably attributed to technical errors. We therefore divided the expression levels in PCAE-treated cells by those of the vehicle-treated cells and considered changes greater than two-fold to be substantial up-regulation and changes smaller than 0.5-fold to be down-regulation (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Gene expression profiling (GEP) results further suggest that, in addition to its known effects with regard to EC prevention, PCAE may also exert antitumor activity on established EC cells.Many previous studies have identified the chemo-preventive effects of natural plant materials and the potential role of these materials in chemotherapy.This current study used human EC Ishikawa cells to investigate the anti-tumor effects of PCAE in EC cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan. nick@adm.cgmh.org.tw.

ABSTRACT
Pogostemon cablin (PC) is a traditional herbal medicine used in the treatment of the common cold, nausea, diarrhea, and even for headaches and fever. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative activity of PC in endometrial cancer (EC) cells have yet to be fully elucidated. This study investigated the anticancer effects of an aqueous extract of Pogostemon cablin (PCAE), specifically induced apoptosis in EC (Ishikawa) cells. Proliferation of EC cells following exposure to PCAE was assessed by an MTT assay. DNA content and the induction of cell cycle apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry (FACS Calibur). Protein caspase-3 and, -9 as well as AIF were investigated using Western blot. Our results demonstrate growth inhibition of Ishikawa cells by PCAE. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity caused PCAE-treated cell lines to accumulate in apoptosis. Gene expression profiling (GEP) results further suggest that, in addition to its known effects with regard to EC prevention, PCAE may also exert antitumor activity on established EC cells. Many previous studies have identified the chemo-preventive effects of natural plant materials and the potential role of these materials in chemotherapy. This current study used human EC Ishikawa cells to investigate the anti-tumor effects of PCAE in EC cells. Our results demonstrate that PCAE inhibits the growth of cancer cells and induces apoptosis, which suggests the potential applicability of PCAE as an antitumor agent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus