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Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

de Llano DG, Esteban-Fernández A, Sánchez-Patán F, Martínlvarez PJ, Moreno-Arribas MV, Bartolomé B - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood.Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition).The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL), CSIC-UAM, C/Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049 Madrid, Spain. d.g.dellano@csic.es.

ABSTRACT
Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structures of phenolic compounds tested for their anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli.
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ijms-16-12119-f001: Chemical structures of phenolic compounds tested for their anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

Mentions: The optimized method was applied to a total of 16 phenolic compounds, including flavan-3-ols ((−)-epicatechin) and dimeric procyanidins of A-type (A2) and B-type (B2), and microbial-derived metabolites, such as simple phenols (2), benzoic acids (5), phenylacetic acids (3) and phenylpropionic acids (3) (Figure 1). Inhibition of adherence of UPEC ATCC®53503™ to T24 uroepithelial cells was established by incubating constant numbers of uroepithelial cells and bacteria preincubated with phenolic compounds (at concentrations of 100, 250 and 500 µM) (Table 1). Antimicrobial and cytotoxicity activity determinations were also carried out, and the tested concentrations and times were harmless to pro- and eukaryotic cells (data not shown). In relation to flavan-3-ols, and as reported in the literature for other UPEC strains, our results showed statistically-significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of the adherence of UPEC ATCC®53503™ to bladder cells by procyanidin A2 ((−)-epicatechin-(4β-8, 2β-O-7)-(−)-epicatechin) (51.3% at 500 µM) (Table 1). However, no inhibitory effect was observed for procyanidin B2 ((−)-epicatechin-(4β-8)-(−)-epicatechin) or (−)-epicatechin at any of the concentrations tested (Table 1).


Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

de Llano DG, Esteban-Fernández A, Sánchez-Patán F, Martínlvarez PJ, Moreno-Arribas MV, Bartolomé B - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Chemical structures of phenolic compounds tested for their anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490433&req=5

ijms-16-12119-f001: Chemical structures of phenolic compounds tested for their anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli.
Mentions: The optimized method was applied to a total of 16 phenolic compounds, including flavan-3-ols ((−)-epicatechin) and dimeric procyanidins of A-type (A2) and B-type (B2), and microbial-derived metabolites, such as simple phenols (2), benzoic acids (5), phenylacetic acids (3) and phenylpropionic acids (3) (Figure 1). Inhibition of adherence of UPEC ATCC®53503™ to T24 uroepithelial cells was established by incubating constant numbers of uroepithelial cells and bacteria preincubated with phenolic compounds (at concentrations of 100, 250 and 500 µM) (Table 1). Antimicrobial and cytotoxicity activity determinations were also carried out, and the tested concentrations and times were harmless to pro- and eukaryotic cells (data not shown). In relation to flavan-3-ols, and as reported in the literature for other UPEC strains, our results showed statistically-significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of the adherence of UPEC ATCC®53503™ to bladder cells by procyanidin A2 ((−)-epicatechin-(4β-8, 2β-O-7)-(−)-epicatechin) (51.3% at 500 µM) (Table 1). However, no inhibitory effect was observed for procyanidin B2 ((−)-epicatechin-(4β-8)-(−)-epicatechin) or (−)-epicatechin at any of the concentrations tested (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood.Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition).The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL), CSIC-UAM, C/Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049 Madrid, Spain. d.g.dellano@csic.es.

ABSTRACT
Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus