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Temporal Genetic Dynamics of an Invasive Species, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), in an Early Phase of Establishment.

Yang XM, Lou H, Sun JT, Zhu YM, Xue XF, Hong XY - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Many species can successfully colonize new areas despite their propagules having low genetic variation.FST and STRUCTURE analysis also showed that most temporal population comparisons from the same sites were not significantly differentiated.Our results showed that the invasive populations of F. occidentalis in China can maintain temporal stability in genetic composition at an early phase of establishment despite having lower genetic diversity than in their native range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, China.

ABSTRACT
Many species can successfully colonize new areas despite their propagules having low genetic variation. We assessed whether the decreased genetic diversity could result in temporal fluctuations of genetic parameters of the new populations of an invasive species, western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. This study was conducted in eight localities from four climate regions in China, where F. occidentalis was introduced in the year 2000 and had lower genetic diversity than its native populations. We also tested the level of genetic differentiation in these introduced populations. The genetic diversity of the samples at different years in the same locality was not significantly different from each other in most localities. FST and STRUCTURE analysis also showed that most temporal population comparisons from the same sites were not significantly differentiated. Our results showed that the invasive populations of F. occidentalis in China can maintain temporal stability in genetic composition at an early phase of establishment despite having lower genetic diversity than in their native range.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bayesian clustering analysis of Frankliniella occidentalis populations.Each individual is represented by a vertical bar displaying membership coefficients to each genetic cluster. Results for K = 2 and K = 3 were shown.
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f2: Bayesian clustering analysis of Frankliniella occidentalis populations.Each individual is represented by a vertical bar displaying membership coefficients to each genetic cluster. Results for K = 2 and K = 3 were shown.

Mentions: The FST matrix showed that mtDNA haplotype frequencies among years within the same locality were not significantly different (Table S1, supporting information). Pairwise measures of microsatellite genetic distance also revealed temporal homogeneity, i.e., 18 of the 24 among-year comparisons from the same sites were not significantly differentiated (Table S2). The six among-year comparisons that revealed significant differentiation were three in JQ, two in KM and one in SY (Table S2). AMOVA did not detect any significant genetic differentiation overall between temporal groupings but it did detect genetic differentiation between geographical groupings (Table 3). Pairwise FST values ranged from 0.001 to 0.178 with the highest differentiation observed between JQ11 and SY12 (Table S2). This also reflected the fact that JQ was genetically isolated from other populations. As discussed in a previous study20, the Bayesian clustering analysis also revealed the presence of two distinct clusters (Figure S2). One hypothetical cluster includes the samples in different years in the northeastern population HRB and the samples in different years in the northwestern population JQ. However, we considered this estimate overly conservative because the posterior probability continued to increase between K = 2 and K = 3. So, when K = 3, all the samples in JQ formed a single cluster and the samples in the neighboring populations HRB and SY clustered together (Fig. 2). The K = 4 groupings did not increase likelihood values and were biologically uninterpretable. Additionally, the temporal samples for different years from the same locality always clustered together for both K = 2 and K = 3 (Fig. 2). The Bayesian clustering analysis could not distinguish the two F. occidentalis forms (CM and HD form) as the case in Yang et al. (2012)20. GENECLASS identified 16 individuals as potentially first-generation (F0) migrants (not listed), of which 15 migrated from the three southwestern localities (BS, DL and KM) to almost all of the other localities. In addition, we did not detect isolation by distance pattern between the eight localities based on all microsatellite loci (Z = 1843.97, R = 0.21, P = 0.14) and COI marker (Z = 3047.89, R = 0.05, P = 0.38) data.


Temporal Genetic Dynamics of an Invasive Species, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), in an Early Phase of Establishment.

Yang XM, Lou H, Sun JT, Zhu YM, Xue XF, Hong XY - Sci Rep (2015)

Bayesian clustering analysis of Frankliniella occidentalis populations.Each individual is represented by a vertical bar displaying membership coefficients to each genetic cluster. Results for K = 2 and K = 3 were shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490395&req=5

f2: Bayesian clustering analysis of Frankliniella occidentalis populations.Each individual is represented by a vertical bar displaying membership coefficients to each genetic cluster. Results for K = 2 and K = 3 were shown.
Mentions: The FST matrix showed that mtDNA haplotype frequencies among years within the same locality were not significantly different (Table S1, supporting information). Pairwise measures of microsatellite genetic distance also revealed temporal homogeneity, i.e., 18 of the 24 among-year comparisons from the same sites were not significantly differentiated (Table S2). The six among-year comparisons that revealed significant differentiation were three in JQ, two in KM and one in SY (Table S2). AMOVA did not detect any significant genetic differentiation overall between temporal groupings but it did detect genetic differentiation between geographical groupings (Table 3). Pairwise FST values ranged from 0.001 to 0.178 with the highest differentiation observed between JQ11 and SY12 (Table S2). This also reflected the fact that JQ was genetically isolated from other populations. As discussed in a previous study20, the Bayesian clustering analysis also revealed the presence of two distinct clusters (Figure S2). One hypothetical cluster includes the samples in different years in the northeastern population HRB and the samples in different years in the northwestern population JQ. However, we considered this estimate overly conservative because the posterior probability continued to increase between K = 2 and K = 3. So, when K = 3, all the samples in JQ formed a single cluster and the samples in the neighboring populations HRB and SY clustered together (Fig. 2). The K = 4 groupings did not increase likelihood values and were biologically uninterpretable. Additionally, the temporal samples for different years from the same locality always clustered together for both K = 2 and K = 3 (Fig. 2). The Bayesian clustering analysis could not distinguish the two F. occidentalis forms (CM and HD form) as the case in Yang et al. (2012)20. GENECLASS identified 16 individuals as potentially first-generation (F0) migrants (not listed), of which 15 migrated from the three southwestern localities (BS, DL and KM) to almost all of the other localities. In addition, we did not detect isolation by distance pattern between the eight localities based on all microsatellite loci (Z = 1843.97, R = 0.21, P = 0.14) and COI marker (Z = 3047.89, R = 0.05, P = 0.38) data.

Bottom Line: Many species can successfully colonize new areas despite their propagules having low genetic variation.FST and STRUCTURE analysis also showed that most temporal population comparisons from the same sites were not significantly differentiated.Our results showed that the invasive populations of F. occidentalis in China can maintain temporal stability in genetic composition at an early phase of establishment despite having lower genetic diversity than in their native range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, China.

ABSTRACT
Many species can successfully colonize new areas despite their propagules having low genetic variation. We assessed whether the decreased genetic diversity could result in temporal fluctuations of genetic parameters of the new populations of an invasive species, western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. This study was conducted in eight localities from four climate regions in China, where F. occidentalis was introduced in the year 2000 and had lower genetic diversity than its native populations. We also tested the level of genetic differentiation in these introduced populations. The genetic diversity of the samples at different years in the same locality was not significantly different from each other in most localities. FST and STRUCTURE analysis also showed that most temporal population comparisons from the same sites were not significantly differentiated. Our results showed that the invasive populations of F. occidentalis in China can maintain temporal stability in genetic composition at an early phase of establishment despite having lower genetic diversity than in their native range.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus