Limits...
Influence of slip on the Plateau-Rayleigh instability on a fibre.

Haefner S, Benzaquen M, Bäumchen O, Salez T, Peters R, McGraw JD, Jacobs K, Raphaël E, Dalnoki-Veress K - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast to the case of a free liquid cylinder, describing the evolution of a liquid layer on a solid fibre requires consideration of the solid-liquid interface.Here we revisit the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of a liquid coating a fibre by varying the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the fibre-liquid interface, from no slip to slip.Although the wavelength is not sensitive to the solid-liquid interface, we find that the growth rate of the undulations strongly depends on the hydrodynamic boundary condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, D-66041 Saarbrücken, Germany [2] Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4M1.

ABSTRACT
The Plateau-Rayleigh instability of a liquid column underlies a variety of fascinating phenomena that can be observed in everyday life. In contrast to the case of a free liquid cylinder, describing the evolution of a liquid layer on a solid fibre requires consideration of the solid-liquid interface. Here we revisit the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of a liquid coating a fibre by varying the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the fibre-liquid interface, from no slip to slip. Although the wavelength is not sensitive to the solid-liquid interface, we find that the growth rate of the undulations strongly depends on the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The experiments are in excellent agreement with a new thin-film theory incorporating slip, thus providing an original, quantitative and robust tool to measure slip lengths.

No MeSH data available.


Plateau–Rayleigh instability on a fibre.(a) Schematic and (b) optical micrographs illustrating the PRI for a liquid PS film on a glass fibre. At t=0, the PS film on the no-slip fibre has a thickness e0=13.2±1 μm and the glass fibre radius is a=9.6±1 μm. The width of the optical images is 560 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490368&req=5

f1: Plateau–Rayleigh instability on a fibre.(a) Schematic and (b) optical micrographs illustrating the PRI for a liquid PS film on a glass fibre. At t=0, the PS film on the no-slip fibre has a thickness e0=13.2±1 μm and the glass fibre radius is a=9.6±1 μm. The width of the optical images is 560 μm.

Mentions: An entangled polystyrene (PS, 78 kg mol−1) film with homogeneous thickness e0 (5–93 μm) is coated onto a fibre with radius a (10–25 μm), resulting in a PS-coated fibre with radius h0=a+e0, as schematically shown in Fig. 1a. Glass fibres provide a simple no-slip boundary condition33. In contrast, a slip interface results from coating the entangled PS film onto a glass fibre pre-coated with a nanometric thin amorphous fluoropolymer (AF2400, 14±1 nm)34. The fluoropolymer coating on glass was used, because it is well established that PS, above a critical molecular weight (Mc∼35 kg mol−1), exhibits significant hydrodynamic slip at this solid–liquid interface34. Henceforth, we will refer to these as the ‘no-slip' and ‘slip' fibres.


Influence of slip on the Plateau-Rayleigh instability on a fibre.

Haefner S, Benzaquen M, Bäumchen O, Salez T, Peters R, McGraw JD, Jacobs K, Raphaël E, Dalnoki-Veress K - Nat Commun (2015)

Plateau–Rayleigh instability on a fibre.(a) Schematic and (b) optical micrographs illustrating the PRI for a liquid PS film on a glass fibre. At t=0, the PS film on the no-slip fibre has a thickness e0=13.2±1 μm and the glass fibre radius is a=9.6±1 μm. The width of the optical images is 560 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490368&req=5

f1: Plateau–Rayleigh instability on a fibre.(a) Schematic and (b) optical micrographs illustrating the PRI for a liquid PS film on a glass fibre. At t=0, the PS film on the no-slip fibre has a thickness e0=13.2±1 μm and the glass fibre radius is a=9.6±1 μm. The width of the optical images is 560 μm.
Mentions: An entangled polystyrene (PS, 78 kg mol−1) film with homogeneous thickness e0 (5–93 μm) is coated onto a fibre with radius a (10–25 μm), resulting in a PS-coated fibre with radius h0=a+e0, as schematically shown in Fig. 1a. Glass fibres provide a simple no-slip boundary condition33. In contrast, a slip interface results from coating the entangled PS film onto a glass fibre pre-coated with a nanometric thin amorphous fluoropolymer (AF2400, 14±1 nm)34. The fluoropolymer coating on glass was used, because it is well established that PS, above a critical molecular weight (Mc∼35 kg mol−1), exhibits significant hydrodynamic slip at this solid–liquid interface34. Henceforth, we will refer to these as the ‘no-slip' and ‘slip' fibres.

Bottom Line: In contrast to the case of a free liquid cylinder, describing the evolution of a liquid layer on a solid fibre requires consideration of the solid-liquid interface.Here we revisit the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of a liquid coating a fibre by varying the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the fibre-liquid interface, from no slip to slip.Although the wavelength is not sensitive to the solid-liquid interface, we find that the growth rate of the undulations strongly depends on the hydrodynamic boundary condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, D-66041 Saarbrücken, Germany [2] Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4M1.

ABSTRACT
The Plateau-Rayleigh instability of a liquid column underlies a variety of fascinating phenomena that can be observed in everyday life. In contrast to the case of a free liquid cylinder, describing the evolution of a liquid layer on a solid fibre requires consideration of the solid-liquid interface. Here we revisit the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of a liquid coating a fibre by varying the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the fibre-liquid interface, from no slip to slip. Although the wavelength is not sensitive to the solid-liquid interface, we find that the growth rate of the undulations strongly depends on the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The experiments are in excellent agreement with a new thin-film theory incorporating slip, thus providing an original, quantitative and robust tool to measure slip lengths.

No MeSH data available.