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The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Regulating Circulating Levels of Adiponectin: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Bell S, Britton A - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. (2015)

Bottom Line: A bivariate dual-change score model was used to estimate the effect of alcohol intake on upcoming change in adiponectin.Alcohol intake is not associated with changes in circulating adiponectin levels in this cohort.This finding provides evidence that adiponectin levels are unlikely to mediate the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Context: The role of alcohol intake in influencing longitudinal trajectories of adiponectin is unclear.

Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the association between alcohol intake and changes in the circulating levels of adiponectin over repeat measures.

Design, setting, and participants: A prospective cohort study of 2855 men and women (74% men with a mean age of 50 y at baseline) drawn from the Whitehall II study. Data from study phases 3 (1991-1993), 5 (1997-1999), and 7 (2002-2004) were used.

Main outcome measure: Adiponectin serum concentrations (nanograms per milliliter) were measured, and alcohol intake was defined in terms of number of UK units (1 U = 8 g ethanol) consumed in the previous 7 days on three occasions. Cross-sectional associations between alcohol and adiponectin levels were calculated using linear regression. A bivariate dual-change score model was used to estimate the effect of alcohol intake on upcoming change in adiponectin. Models were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and smoking status.

Results: Alcohol consumption was cross-sectionally associated with (log transformed) adiponectin levels (β ranging from .001 to .004, depending on phase and level of adjustment) but was not associated with changes in adiponectin levels over time [γ = -0.002 (SE 0.002), P = 0.246].

Conclusion: Alcohol intake is not associated with changes in circulating adiponectin levels in this cohort. This finding provides evidence that adiponectin levels are unlikely to mediate the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. It is important to consider dynamic longitudinal relationships rather than cross-sectional associations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Simplified diagram of model specification. Single-headed arrows indicate regression coefficients, and double-headed arrows indicate covariance terms.
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Figure 1: Simplified diagram of model specification. Single-headed arrows indicate regression coefficients, and double-headed arrows indicate covariance terms.

Mentions: Both the intercepts (estimated values for log transformed adiponectin and weekly alcohol intake at the first study phase) and slopes (α terms) were fitted as random effects. Intercepts and slopes were correlated within single processes (for example, the adiponectin intercept with the adiponectin slope) and between processes (for example, the alcohol intercept with the adiponectin slope). See Figure 1 for a simplified graphical depiction of the model. As described above, intercepts and slopes were estimated conditional on baseline covariates, whereas smoking status was entered into the model as a time-varying covariate. Because adiponectin values were heavily positively skewed, we used natural log-transformed values for analysis.


The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Regulating Circulating Levels of Adiponectin: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Bell S, Britton A - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. (2015)

Simplified diagram of model specification. Single-headed arrows indicate regression coefficients, and double-headed arrows indicate covariance terms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490299&req=5

Figure 1: Simplified diagram of model specification. Single-headed arrows indicate regression coefficients, and double-headed arrows indicate covariance terms.
Mentions: Both the intercepts (estimated values for log transformed adiponectin and weekly alcohol intake at the first study phase) and slopes (α terms) were fitted as random effects. Intercepts and slopes were correlated within single processes (for example, the adiponectin intercept with the adiponectin slope) and between processes (for example, the alcohol intercept with the adiponectin slope). See Figure 1 for a simplified graphical depiction of the model. As described above, intercepts and slopes were estimated conditional on baseline covariates, whereas smoking status was entered into the model as a time-varying covariate. Because adiponectin values were heavily positively skewed, we used natural log-transformed values for analysis.

Bottom Line: A bivariate dual-change score model was used to estimate the effect of alcohol intake on upcoming change in adiponectin.Alcohol intake is not associated with changes in circulating adiponectin levels in this cohort.This finding provides evidence that adiponectin levels are unlikely to mediate the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Context: The role of alcohol intake in influencing longitudinal trajectories of adiponectin is unclear.

Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the association between alcohol intake and changes in the circulating levels of adiponectin over repeat measures.

Design, setting, and participants: A prospective cohort study of 2855 men and women (74% men with a mean age of 50 y at baseline) drawn from the Whitehall II study. Data from study phases 3 (1991-1993), 5 (1997-1999), and 7 (2002-2004) were used.

Main outcome measure: Adiponectin serum concentrations (nanograms per milliliter) were measured, and alcohol intake was defined in terms of number of UK units (1 U = 8 g ethanol) consumed in the previous 7 days on three occasions. Cross-sectional associations between alcohol and adiponectin levels were calculated using linear regression. A bivariate dual-change score model was used to estimate the effect of alcohol intake on upcoming change in adiponectin. Models were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and smoking status.

Results: Alcohol consumption was cross-sectionally associated with (log transformed) adiponectin levels (β ranging from .001 to .004, depending on phase and level of adjustment) but was not associated with changes in adiponectin levels over time [γ = -0.002 (SE 0.002), P = 0.246].

Conclusion: Alcohol intake is not associated with changes in circulating adiponectin levels in this cohort. This finding provides evidence that adiponectin levels are unlikely to mediate the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. It is important to consider dynamic longitudinal relationships rather than cross-sectional associations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus