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Altered functional connectivity of the cingulate subregions in schizophrenia.

Wang D, Zhou Y, Zhuo C, Qin W, Zhu J, Liu H, Xu L, Yu C - Transl Psychiatry (2015)

Bottom Line: The rsFCs of each cingulate subregion were compared between the two groups and the atrophy effect was considered.Results with and without global signal regression were reported.Some of these increased rsFCs were also significant after GSR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Functional Imaging, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China.

ABSTRACT
Schizophrenia patients have shown altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the cingulate cortex; however, it is unknown whether rsFCs of the cingulate subregions are differentially affected in this disorder. We aimed to clarify the issue by comparing rsFCs of each cingulate subregion between healthy controls and schizophrenia patients. A total of 102 healthy controls and 94 schizophrenia patients underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging with a sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging sequence to reduce susceptibility-induced signal loss and distortion. The cingulate cortex was divided into nine subregions, including the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), areas 24 and 32 of the pregenual ACC, areas 24 and 32 of the anterior mid-cingulate cortex (aMCC), posterior MCC (pMCC), dorsal (dPCC) and ventral (vPCC) posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC). The rsFCs of each cingulate subregion were compared between the two groups and the atrophy effect was considered. Results with and without global signal regression were reported. Most cingulate subregions exhibited decreased rsFCs in schizophrenia after global signal regression (GSR). Without GSR, only increased rsFC was found in schizophrenia, which primarily restricted to the aMCC, PCC and RSC. Some of these increased rsFCs were also significant after GSR. These findings suggest that GSR can greatly affect between-group differences in rsFCs and the consistently increased rsFCs may challenge the functional disconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distortion and signal loss of functional images derived from various acquisition sequences. The temporal pole, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (red color) and orbitofrontal cortex exhibit less distortion and signal loss in fMRI data acquired by the sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging (SENSE-SPIRAL) sequence (a) than in those acquired by the echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence (b). fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging.
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fig1: Distortion and signal loss of functional images derived from various acquisition sequences. The temporal pole, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (red color) and orbitofrontal cortex exhibit less distortion and signal loss in fMRI data acquired by the sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging (SENSE-SPIRAL) sequence (a) than in those acquired by the echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence (b). fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Mentions: We projected the ROI of the sACC onto the mean normalized template of the fMRI data derived from the EPI and SENSE-SPIRAL sequences to compare signal loss and distortion of the sACC between the two acquisition sequences. Compared with those derived from the EPI sequence, the sACC images derived from the SENSE-SPIRAL sequence exhibited less signal loss and distortion (Figure 1). Therefore, we chose fMRI data acquired by the SENSE-SPIRAL sequence for rsFC analyses.


Altered functional connectivity of the cingulate subregions in schizophrenia.

Wang D, Zhou Y, Zhuo C, Qin W, Zhu J, Liu H, Xu L, Yu C - Transl Psychiatry (2015)

Distortion and signal loss of functional images derived from various acquisition sequences. The temporal pole, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (red color) and orbitofrontal cortex exhibit less distortion and signal loss in fMRI data acquired by the sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging (SENSE-SPIRAL) sequence (a) than in those acquired by the echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence (b). fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490280&req=5

fig1: Distortion and signal loss of functional images derived from various acquisition sequences. The temporal pole, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (red color) and orbitofrontal cortex exhibit less distortion and signal loss in fMRI data acquired by the sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging (SENSE-SPIRAL) sequence (a) than in those acquired by the echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence (b). fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging.
Mentions: We projected the ROI of the sACC onto the mean normalized template of the fMRI data derived from the EPI and SENSE-SPIRAL sequences to compare signal loss and distortion of the sACC between the two acquisition sequences. Compared with those derived from the EPI sequence, the sACC images derived from the SENSE-SPIRAL sequence exhibited less signal loss and distortion (Figure 1). Therefore, we chose fMRI data acquired by the SENSE-SPIRAL sequence for rsFC analyses.

Bottom Line: The rsFCs of each cingulate subregion were compared between the two groups and the atrophy effect was considered.Results with and without global signal regression were reported.Some of these increased rsFCs were also significant after GSR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Functional Imaging, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China.

ABSTRACT
Schizophrenia patients have shown altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the cingulate cortex; however, it is unknown whether rsFCs of the cingulate subregions are differentially affected in this disorder. We aimed to clarify the issue by comparing rsFCs of each cingulate subregion between healthy controls and schizophrenia patients. A total of 102 healthy controls and 94 schizophrenia patients underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging with a sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging sequence to reduce susceptibility-induced signal loss and distortion. The cingulate cortex was divided into nine subregions, including the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), areas 24 and 32 of the pregenual ACC, areas 24 and 32 of the anterior mid-cingulate cortex (aMCC), posterior MCC (pMCC), dorsal (dPCC) and ventral (vPCC) posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC). The rsFCs of each cingulate subregion were compared between the two groups and the atrophy effect was considered. Results with and without global signal regression were reported. Most cingulate subregions exhibited decreased rsFCs in schizophrenia after global signal regression (GSR). Without GSR, only increased rsFC was found in schizophrenia, which primarily restricted to the aMCC, PCC and RSC. Some of these increased rsFCs were also significant after GSR. These findings suggest that GSR can greatly affect between-group differences in rsFCs and the consistently increased rsFCs may challenge the functional disconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus