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Improved grazing management may increase soil carbon sequestration in temperate steppe.

Chen W, Huang D, Liu N, Zhang Y, Badgery WB, Wang X, Shen Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: While deferred grazing (RHM and RMH) sequestered less soil carbon compared to MMM, they showed higher standing root mass, maintained a more desirable pasture composition, and had better ability to retain soil N.Constant high grazing pressure (HHH) caused diminished above- and belowground plant production, more soil N losses and an unfavorable microbial environment and had reduced carbon input.Overall, the soil carbon sequestration in the temperate grassland is affected by the grazing regime that is applied, and grazing can be altered to improve soil carbon sequestration in the temperate steppe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Grassland Science, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, West Road 2 Yuan Ming Yuan, Beijing 100193, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Different grazing strategies impact grassland plant production and may also regulate the soil carbon formation. For a site in semiarid temperate steppe, we studied the effect of combinations of rest, high and moderate grazing pressure over three stages of the growing season, on the process involved in soil carbon sequestration. Results show that constant moderate grazing (MMM) exhibited the highest root production and turnover accumulating the most soil carbon. While deferred grazing (RHM and RMH) sequestered less soil carbon compared to MMM, they showed higher standing root mass, maintained a more desirable pasture composition, and had better ability to retain soil N. Constant high grazing pressure (HHH) caused diminished above- and belowground plant production, more soil N losses and an unfavorable microbial environment and had reduced carbon input. Reducing grazing pressure in the last grazing stage (HHM) still had a negative impact on soil carbon. Regression analyses show that adjusting stocking rate to ~5SE/ha with ~40% vegetation utilization rate can get the most carbon accrual. Overall, the soil carbon sequestration in the temperate grassland is affected by the grazing regime that is applied, and grazing can be altered to improve soil carbon sequestration in the temperate steppe.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Soil organic carbon (a) total nitrogen (b) and C:N (c) of 0–30 cm soil layers from different grazing regimes. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences (P < 0.05) in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and C:N between treatments. Values are mean ± SE.
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f4: Soil organic carbon (a) total nitrogen (b) and C:N (c) of 0–30 cm soil layers from different grazing regimes. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences (P < 0.05) in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and C:N between treatments. Values are mean ± SE.

Mentions: Soil carbon content was affected by grazing and decreased with sampling depth (p < 0.05; Fig. 4a).There were significant interactions (P < 0.05) between grazing and sampling depth. Soil organic carbon change only occurred in the top 0–10 cm of the soil. The soil carbon content of MMM was significantly higher than other regimes (p < 0.05). RHM and RMH showed no difference in soil carbon (p > 0.05), but were significantly higher than HHH and HHM (p < 0.05). The top soil carbon change was positively correlated with the belowground root mass, root production and root turnover rate (Fig. 5a–c).


Improved grazing management may increase soil carbon sequestration in temperate steppe.

Chen W, Huang D, Liu N, Zhang Y, Badgery WB, Wang X, Shen Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Soil organic carbon (a) total nitrogen (b) and C:N (c) of 0–30 cm soil layers from different grazing regimes. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences (P < 0.05) in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and C:N between treatments. Values are mean ± SE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4490272&req=5

f4: Soil organic carbon (a) total nitrogen (b) and C:N (c) of 0–30 cm soil layers from different grazing regimes. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences (P < 0.05) in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and C:N between treatments. Values are mean ± SE.
Mentions: Soil carbon content was affected by grazing and decreased with sampling depth (p < 0.05; Fig. 4a).There were significant interactions (P < 0.05) between grazing and sampling depth. Soil organic carbon change only occurred in the top 0–10 cm of the soil. The soil carbon content of MMM was significantly higher than other regimes (p < 0.05). RHM and RMH showed no difference in soil carbon (p > 0.05), but were significantly higher than HHH and HHM (p < 0.05). The top soil carbon change was positively correlated with the belowground root mass, root production and root turnover rate (Fig. 5a–c).

Bottom Line: While deferred grazing (RHM and RMH) sequestered less soil carbon compared to MMM, they showed higher standing root mass, maintained a more desirable pasture composition, and had better ability to retain soil N.Constant high grazing pressure (HHH) caused diminished above- and belowground plant production, more soil N losses and an unfavorable microbial environment and had reduced carbon input.Overall, the soil carbon sequestration in the temperate grassland is affected by the grazing regime that is applied, and grazing can be altered to improve soil carbon sequestration in the temperate steppe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Grassland Science, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, West Road 2 Yuan Ming Yuan, Beijing 100193, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Different grazing strategies impact grassland plant production and may also regulate the soil carbon formation. For a site in semiarid temperate steppe, we studied the effect of combinations of rest, high and moderate grazing pressure over three stages of the growing season, on the process involved in soil carbon sequestration. Results show that constant moderate grazing (MMM) exhibited the highest root production and turnover accumulating the most soil carbon. While deferred grazing (RHM and RMH) sequestered less soil carbon compared to MMM, they showed higher standing root mass, maintained a more desirable pasture composition, and had better ability to retain soil N. Constant high grazing pressure (HHH) caused diminished above- and belowground plant production, more soil N losses and an unfavorable microbial environment and had reduced carbon input. Reducing grazing pressure in the last grazing stage (HHM) still had a negative impact on soil carbon. Regression analyses show that adjusting stocking rate to ~5SE/ha with ~40% vegetation utilization rate can get the most carbon accrual. Overall, the soil carbon sequestration in the temperate grassland is affected by the grazing regime that is applied, and grazing can be altered to improve soil carbon sequestration in the temperate steppe.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus