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Metabolic Effects of Access to Sucrose Drink in Female Rats and Transmission of Some Effects to Their Offspring.

Kendig MD, Ekayanti W, Stewart H, Boakes RA, Rooney K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Again no effect of maternal diet was detected.Higher fasting glucose levels were found in offspring of sugar-fed mothers.Behavioural measures of memory in Stage 3 did not reveal any effects of maternal diet or exercise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology (A18), University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The aims of this study were, first, to examine the metabolic consequences for female rats of having unrestricted access to 10% sucrose solution and, second, to test for effects of this dietary intervention on their offspring. In Stage 1 females were mated following a 4-week period in which one group was given the sucrose in addition to their normal chow and a control group was given chow and water only. Sucrose was removed at parturition and the pups monitored until weaning. Despite the development of glucose intolerance in sucrose-fed mothers, no effects were detected on litter size or pup weights. In Stage 2 voluntary activity of offspring was assessed over postnatal days (PND) 51-60 and their glucose tolerance measured at PND89-94. Again no effect of maternal diet was detected. Only male offspring were used in Stage 3, which began when they were 13 weeks old. Four groups were given 10% sucrose solution for 48 days in a 2 x 2 design, in which one factor was maternal diet and the other was whether they were given 2-h access to an activity wheel on alternate days. Higher fasting glucose levels were found in offspring of sugar-fed mothers. Exercise increased insulin sensitivity in these rats but not in offspring of control mothers. Behavioural measures of memory in Stage 3 did not reveal any effects of maternal diet or exercise. Overall, this study suggested that, while providing 10% sucrose solution ad-libitum was sufficient to impair maternal metabolism, the impact of this dietary manipulation on offspring may be revealed only when the offspring's diet is similarly manipulated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body weights of female rats across the diet intervention, gestation, and lactation.Rats in the Sucrose group had free access to 10% sucrose solution during the 28-day diet intervention and during gestation, with access ceasing at parturition (P). Data are group means ± SEM, with n = 12 for the diet intervention phase and n = 11 for gestation and lactation phases (1 rat from each group miscarried). Relative to Controls, the Sucrose group gained a greater proportion of starting body weight during the diet intervention, *p = .02, and lost a greater proportion of weight during lactation, **p = .003. Groups did not differ in the rate of weight gain during gestation.
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pone.0131107.g001: Body weights of female rats across the diet intervention, gestation, and lactation.Rats in the Sucrose group had free access to 10% sucrose solution during the 28-day diet intervention and during gestation, with access ceasing at parturition (P). Data are group means ± SEM, with n = 12 for the diet intervention phase and n = 11 for gestation and lactation phases (1 rat from each group miscarried). Relative to Controls, the Sucrose group gained a greater proportion of starting body weight during the diet intervention, *p = .02, and lost a greater proportion of weight during lactation, **p = .003. Groups did not differ in the rate of weight gain during gestation.

Mentions: Body weights during the diet intervention and subsequent gestation and lactation periods are shown in Fig 1. Weights significantly increased during the 28-day diet intervention (F(1, 22) = 183.9, p < .0001) and there was a non-significant trend toward a time by group interaction (F(1, 22) = 3.75, p = .066), suggesting that the rate of increase differed between Sucrose and Control groups. Groups did not differ significantly in absolute weights at any point (largest t(22) = 1.82, p = 0.08, on day 1). For a more sensitive measure of body weight change we also calculated the percentage of starting body weight gained over the 28 days of the intervention. Analysis of this measure found that the Sucrose group gained a significantly greater proportion of starting body weight (32.2 ± 3.3% [SEM]) than the Control group (21.8 ± 2.5%; t(22) = 2.50, p = .02). During gestation weight gain significantly increased (F(1, 20) = 784.86, p < .0001) and the rate of increase did not differ between groups (time by group interaction: F(1, 20) = 1.10, p = .307). From day 1–21 of lactation, body weights declined in all females (F(1, 20) = 14.21, p = .001) and there was a non-significant trend towards a time by group interaction (F(1, 20) = 3.90, p = .062), suggesting that weight change over this interval differed between groups. The Sucrose group lost a significantly greater proportion of weight over this interval than Controls (t(20) = 3.31, p = .003).


Metabolic Effects of Access to Sucrose Drink in Female Rats and Transmission of Some Effects to Their Offspring.

Kendig MD, Ekayanti W, Stewart H, Boakes RA, Rooney K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Body weights of female rats across the diet intervention, gestation, and lactation.Rats in the Sucrose group had free access to 10% sucrose solution during the 28-day diet intervention and during gestation, with access ceasing at parturition (P). Data are group means ± SEM, with n = 12 for the diet intervention phase and n = 11 for gestation and lactation phases (1 rat from each group miscarried). Relative to Controls, the Sucrose group gained a greater proportion of starting body weight during the diet intervention, *p = .02, and lost a greater proportion of weight during lactation, **p = .003. Groups did not differ in the rate of weight gain during gestation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489893&req=5

pone.0131107.g001: Body weights of female rats across the diet intervention, gestation, and lactation.Rats in the Sucrose group had free access to 10% sucrose solution during the 28-day diet intervention and during gestation, with access ceasing at parturition (P). Data are group means ± SEM, with n = 12 for the diet intervention phase and n = 11 for gestation and lactation phases (1 rat from each group miscarried). Relative to Controls, the Sucrose group gained a greater proportion of starting body weight during the diet intervention, *p = .02, and lost a greater proportion of weight during lactation, **p = .003. Groups did not differ in the rate of weight gain during gestation.
Mentions: Body weights during the diet intervention and subsequent gestation and lactation periods are shown in Fig 1. Weights significantly increased during the 28-day diet intervention (F(1, 22) = 183.9, p < .0001) and there was a non-significant trend toward a time by group interaction (F(1, 22) = 3.75, p = .066), suggesting that the rate of increase differed between Sucrose and Control groups. Groups did not differ significantly in absolute weights at any point (largest t(22) = 1.82, p = 0.08, on day 1). For a more sensitive measure of body weight change we also calculated the percentage of starting body weight gained over the 28 days of the intervention. Analysis of this measure found that the Sucrose group gained a significantly greater proportion of starting body weight (32.2 ± 3.3% [SEM]) than the Control group (21.8 ± 2.5%; t(22) = 2.50, p = .02). During gestation weight gain significantly increased (F(1, 20) = 784.86, p < .0001) and the rate of increase did not differ between groups (time by group interaction: F(1, 20) = 1.10, p = .307). From day 1–21 of lactation, body weights declined in all females (F(1, 20) = 14.21, p = .001) and there was a non-significant trend towards a time by group interaction (F(1, 20) = 3.90, p = .062), suggesting that weight change over this interval differed between groups. The Sucrose group lost a significantly greater proportion of weight over this interval than Controls (t(20) = 3.31, p = .003).

Bottom Line: Again no effect of maternal diet was detected.Higher fasting glucose levels were found in offspring of sugar-fed mothers.Behavioural measures of memory in Stage 3 did not reveal any effects of maternal diet or exercise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology (A18), University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The aims of this study were, first, to examine the metabolic consequences for female rats of having unrestricted access to 10% sucrose solution and, second, to test for effects of this dietary intervention on their offspring. In Stage 1 females were mated following a 4-week period in which one group was given the sucrose in addition to their normal chow and a control group was given chow and water only. Sucrose was removed at parturition and the pups monitored until weaning. Despite the development of glucose intolerance in sucrose-fed mothers, no effects were detected on litter size or pup weights. In Stage 2 voluntary activity of offspring was assessed over postnatal days (PND) 51-60 and their glucose tolerance measured at PND89-94. Again no effect of maternal diet was detected. Only male offspring were used in Stage 3, which began when they were 13 weeks old. Four groups were given 10% sucrose solution for 48 days in a 2 x 2 design, in which one factor was maternal diet and the other was whether they were given 2-h access to an activity wheel on alternate days. Higher fasting glucose levels were found in offspring of sugar-fed mothers. Exercise increased insulin sensitivity in these rats but not in offspring of control mothers. Behavioural measures of memory in Stage 3 did not reveal any effects of maternal diet or exercise. Overall, this study suggested that, while providing 10% sucrose solution ad-libitum was sufficient to impair maternal metabolism, the impact of this dietary manipulation on offspring may be revealed only when the offspring's diet is similarly manipulated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus