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Comparison of the Oral Microbiomes of Canines and Their Owners Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

Oh C, Lee K, Cheong Y, Lee SW, Park SY, Song CS, Choi IS, Lee JB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%) were the predominant phyla in the human oral samples, whereas Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), and Fusobacteria (12.3%) were predominant in the canine oral samples.The oral microbiomes of dogs and their owners were appreciably different, and similarity in the microbiomes of canines and their owners was not correlated with residing in the same household.Oral-to-oral transfer of Neisseria shayeganii, Porphyromonas canigingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Streptococcus minor from dogs to humans was suspected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Science Research Institute, Konkuk University, Seoul, 143-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The oral microbiome, which is closely associated with many diseases, and the resident pathogenic oral bacteria, which can be transferred by close physical contact, are important public health considerations. Although the dog is the most common companion animal, the composition of the canine oral microbiome, which may include human pathogenic bacteria, and its relationship with that of their owners are unclear. In this study, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing was used to compare the oral microbiomes of 10 dogs and their owners and to identify zoonotic pathogens. Pyrosequencing revealed 246 operational taxonomic units in the 10 samples, representing 57 genera from eight bacterial phyla. Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%) were the predominant phyla in the human oral samples, whereas Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), and Fusobacteria (12.3%) were predominant in the canine oral samples. The predominant genera in the human samples were Streptococcus (43.9%), Neisseria (10.3%), Haemophilus (9.6%), Prevotella (8.4%), and Veillonella (8.1%), whereas the predominant genera in the canine samples were Actinomyces (17.2%), Unknown (16.8), Porphyromonas (14.8), Fusobacterium (11.8), and Neisseria (7.2%). The oral microbiomes of dogs and their owners were appreciably different, and similarity in the microbiomes of canines and their owners was not correlated with residing in the same household. Oral-to-oral transfer of Neisseria shayeganii, Porphyromonas canigingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Streptococcus minor from dogs to humans was suspected. The finding of potentially zoonotic and periodontopathic bacteria in the canine oral microbiome may be a public health concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative distribution of sequences in the OTUs of the 10 oral samples.Phyla corresponding to more than 0.5% of the sequences determined from the mean distribution of phyla.
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pone.0131468.g002: Relative distribution of sequences in the OTUs of the 10 oral samples.Phyla corresponding to more than 0.5% of the sequences determined from the mean distribution of phyla.

Mentions: Sequences were clustered into 246 OTUs, with an average of 71.1±12.1 OTUsper sample (Table 2). Eight known phyla were represented among the 246 OTUs. The consensus taxonomy, which was assigned using the Silva database, indicated that each OTU belonged to the domain Bacteria and to one of eight phyla. In the human oral samples, five phyla had relative sequence abundances greater than 1%: Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%). In the canine oral samples, six phyla had relative abundances greater than 1%: Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), Fusobacteria (12.3%), and Unknown (1.3%) (Fig 2). A total of 57 genera were represented by the OTUs. In the human oral samples, the bacterial taxa with >1% abundance were Streptococcus (43.9%), Neisseria (10.3%), Haemophilus (9.6%), Prevotella (8.4%), Veillonella (8.1%), Actinomyces (4.8%), Rothia (2.1%), Leptotrichia (2.1%), Granulicatella (2.1%), Fusobacterium (1.7%), Gemella (1.3%), and Porphyromonas (1.3%). In the canine oral samples, the bacterial taxa with >1% abundance were Actinomyces (17.2%), Unknown (16.8), Porphyromonas (14.8), Fusobacterium (11.8), Neisseria (7.2%), Pasteurella (4.9%), Lampropedia (2.8%), Capnocytophaga (2.5%), Frigovirgula (2.5%), Conchiformibius (2.4%), Filifactor (1.8%), Eubacterium (1.7%), Streptococcus (1.5%), Corynebacterium (1.2%), and Derxia (1.1%) (Fig 3).


Comparison of the Oral Microbiomes of Canines and Their Owners Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

Oh C, Lee K, Cheong Y, Lee SW, Park SY, Song CS, Choi IS, Lee JB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relative distribution of sequences in the OTUs of the 10 oral samples.Phyla corresponding to more than 0.5% of the sequences determined from the mean distribution of phyla.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489859&req=5

pone.0131468.g002: Relative distribution of sequences in the OTUs of the 10 oral samples.Phyla corresponding to more than 0.5% of the sequences determined from the mean distribution of phyla.
Mentions: Sequences were clustered into 246 OTUs, with an average of 71.1±12.1 OTUsper sample (Table 2). Eight known phyla were represented among the 246 OTUs. The consensus taxonomy, which was assigned using the Silva database, indicated that each OTU belonged to the domain Bacteria and to one of eight phyla. In the human oral samples, five phyla had relative sequence abundances greater than 1%: Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%). In the canine oral samples, six phyla had relative abundances greater than 1%: Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), Fusobacteria (12.3%), and Unknown (1.3%) (Fig 2). A total of 57 genera were represented by the OTUs. In the human oral samples, the bacterial taxa with >1% abundance were Streptococcus (43.9%), Neisseria (10.3%), Haemophilus (9.6%), Prevotella (8.4%), Veillonella (8.1%), Actinomyces (4.8%), Rothia (2.1%), Leptotrichia (2.1%), Granulicatella (2.1%), Fusobacterium (1.7%), Gemella (1.3%), and Porphyromonas (1.3%). In the canine oral samples, the bacterial taxa with >1% abundance were Actinomyces (17.2%), Unknown (16.8), Porphyromonas (14.8), Fusobacterium (11.8), Neisseria (7.2%), Pasteurella (4.9%), Lampropedia (2.8%), Capnocytophaga (2.5%), Frigovirgula (2.5%), Conchiformibius (2.4%), Filifactor (1.8%), Eubacterium (1.7%), Streptococcus (1.5%), Corynebacterium (1.2%), and Derxia (1.1%) (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%) were the predominant phyla in the human oral samples, whereas Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), and Fusobacteria (12.3%) were predominant in the canine oral samples.The oral microbiomes of dogs and their owners were appreciably different, and similarity in the microbiomes of canines and their owners was not correlated with residing in the same household.Oral-to-oral transfer of Neisseria shayeganii, Porphyromonas canigingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Streptococcus minor from dogs to humans was suspected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Science Research Institute, Konkuk University, Seoul, 143-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The oral microbiome, which is closely associated with many diseases, and the resident pathogenic oral bacteria, which can be transferred by close physical contact, are important public health considerations. Although the dog is the most common companion animal, the composition of the canine oral microbiome, which may include human pathogenic bacteria, and its relationship with that of their owners are unclear. In this study, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing was used to compare the oral microbiomes of 10 dogs and their owners and to identify zoonotic pathogens. Pyrosequencing revealed 246 operational taxonomic units in the 10 samples, representing 57 genera from eight bacterial phyla. Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%) were the predominant phyla in the human oral samples, whereas Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), and Fusobacteria (12.3%) were predominant in the canine oral samples. The predominant genera in the human samples were Streptococcus (43.9%), Neisseria (10.3%), Haemophilus (9.6%), Prevotella (8.4%), and Veillonella (8.1%), whereas the predominant genera in the canine samples were Actinomyces (17.2%), Unknown (16.8), Porphyromonas (14.8), Fusobacterium (11.8), and Neisseria (7.2%). The oral microbiomes of dogs and their owners were appreciably different, and similarity in the microbiomes of canines and their owners was not correlated with residing in the same household. Oral-to-oral transfer of Neisseria shayeganii, Porphyromonas canigingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Streptococcus minor from dogs to humans was suspected. The finding of potentially zoonotic and periodontopathic bacteria in the canine oral microbiome may be a public health concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus