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Different Effects of Regional Species Pool on Plant Diversity between Forest and Grassland Biomes in Arid Northwest China.

Li L, Liu Y, Wang X, Fang J, Wang Q, Zhang B, Xiao P, Mohammat A, Terwei A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results validated the species pool hypothesis in revealing that RSR had a significant role in shaping LSR patterns in addition to climate.We concluded that the relative effects of climate vs.Our results also showed that RSR revealed a contrasting relationship with soil pH in mountains and in basins, which might reflect differences in evolutionary processes of various habitats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine (Peking Union Medical College), Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Species pool hypothesis is broadly known and frequently tested in various regions and vegetation types. However it has not been tested in the arid Xinjiang region of China due to lack of data. Here with systematic data from references and field survey, we comprehensively examined species pool hypothesis in this region. Took species richness in 0.1° × 0.1° grid cells as regional species richness (RSR) which were obtained from the distribution maps of vascular plant species, and took species diversity of 190 and 103 plots in forest and grassland biomes across Xinjiang as local species richness (LSR), together with the digitalized soil pH and climate data, we tested the species pool hypothesis in this region. We found that: (1) the average RSR was higher in mountains than that in basins and it was negatively correlated with soil pH in mountains while positively correlated with soil pH in basins in Xinjiang; (2) RSR showed a positive correlation with mean annual precipitation (MAP) while showed a hump-shaped pattern with mean annual temperature (MAT); and the changing patterns of LSR were different for forest and grassland along the geographical and climate gradients; (3) LSR of forest was more affected by RSR than by climate, while on the contrary, LSR of grassland was more affected by climate than by RSR. Our results validated the species pool hypothesis in revealing that RSR had a significant role in shaping LSR patterns in addition to climate. We concluded that the relative effects of climate vs. RSR on LSR differed markedly between the forest and grassland communities across Xinjiang. Our results also showed that RSR revealed a contrasting relationship with soil pH in mountains and in basins, which might reflect differences in evolutionary processes of various habitats. In summary, our research systematically analyzed the correlation of species richness in regional and local scales in Xinjiang which provides more insights into the understanding of species pool hypothesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The linear relationships between LSR and RSR for forest and grassland plots pooled together (a & d) and for forest and grassland plots separately (b & e, c & f).Upper row (a, b & c) for plot level data and bottom row (d, e & f) for grid level data; grid level data were the dataset of average species richness of plots that were geographically located in the same grid cell; solid lines represented significant regressions (p < 0.05) and dashed lines were non-significant regressions (p > 0.05).
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pone.0131982.g005: The linear relationships between LSR and RSR for forest and grassland plots pooled together (a & d) and for forest and grassland plots separately (b & e, c & f).Upper row (a, b & c) for plot level data and bottom row (d, e & f) for grid level data; grid level data were the dataset of average species richness of plots that were geographically located in the same grid cell; solid lines represented significant regressions (p < 0.05) and dashed lines were non-significant regressions (p > 0.05).

Mentions: There was a significant effect of RSR on LSR (r2 = 0.05, p < 0.05, Fig 5a) and the effect was different for forest and grassland communities. RSR significantly impacted LSR for forest vegetation (r2 = 0.07, p < 0.05, Fig 5b). However for the grassland, RSR did not impact LSR significantly (p > 0.05, Fig 5c). Similar trends were found by employing grid level data, and were shown in Fig 5d, e&f (r2 = 0.07 & 0.15, p < 0.05 for both communities and forest community; p > 0.05 for the grassland community).


Different Effects of Regional Species Pool on Plant Diversity between Forest and Grassland Biomes in Arid Northwest China.

Li L, Liu Y, Wang X, Fang J, Wang Q, Zhang B, Xiao P, Mohammat A, Terwei A - PLoS ONE (2015)

The linear relationships between LSR and RSR for forest and grassland plots pooled together (a & d) and for forest and grassland plots separately (b & e, c & f).Upper row (a, b & c) for plot level data and bottom row (d, e & f) for grid level data; grid level data were the dataset of average species richness of plots that were geographically located in the same grid cell; solid lines represented significant regressions (p < 0.05) and dashed lines were non-significant regressions (p > 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489744&req=5

pone.0131982.g005: The linear relationships between LSR and RSR for forest and grassland plots pooled together (a & d) and for forest and grassland plots separately (b & e, c & f).Upper row (a, b & c) for plot level data and bottom row (d, e & f) for grid level data; grid level data were the dataset of average species richness of plots that were geographically located in the same grid cell; solid lines represented significant regressions (p < 0.05) and dashed lines were non-significant regressions (p > 0.05).
Mentions: There was a significant effect of RSR on LSR (r2 = 0.05, p < 0.05, Fig 5a) and the effect was different for forest and grassland communities. RSR significantly impacted LSR for forest vegetation (r2 = 0.07, p < 0.05, Fig 5b). However for the grassland, RSR did not impact LSR significantly (p > 0.05, Fig 5c). Similar trends were found by employing grid level data, and were shown in Fig 5d, e&f (r2 = 0.07 & 0.15, p < 0.05 for both communities and forest community; p > 0.05 for the grassland community).

Bottom Line: Our results validated the species pool hypothesis in revealing that RSR had a significant role in shaping LSR patterns in addition to climate.We concluded that the relative effects of climate vs.Our results also showed that RSR revealed a contrasting relationship with soil pH in mountains and in basins, which might reflect differences in evolutionary processes of various habitats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine (Peking Union Medical College), Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Species pool hypothesis is broadly known and frequently tested in various regions and vegetation types. However it has not been tested in the arid Xinjiang region of China due to lack of data. Here with systematic data from references and field survey, we comprehensively examined species pool hypothesis in this region. Took species richness in 0.1° × 0.1° grid cells as regional species richness (RSR) which were obtained from the distribution maps of vascular plant species, and took species diversity of 190 and 103 plots in forest and grassland biomes across Xinjiang as local species richness (LSR), together with the digitalized soil pH and climate data, we tested the species pool hypothesis in this region. We found that: (1) the average RSR was higher in mountains than that in basins and it was negatively correlated with soil pH in mountains while positively correlated with soil pH in basins in Xinjiang; (2) RSR showed a positive correlation with mean annual precipitation (MAP) while showed a hump-shaped pattern with mean annual temperature (MAT); and the changing patterns of LSR were different for forest and grassland along the geographical and climate gradients; (3) LSR of forest was more affected by RSR than by climate, while on the contrary, LSR of grassland was more affected by climate than by RSR. Our results validated the species pool hypothesis in revealing that RSR had a significant role in shaping LSR patterns in addition to climate. We concluded that the relative effects of climate vs. RSR on LSR differed markedly between the forest and grassland communities across Xinjiang. Our results also showed that RSR revealed a contrasting relationship with soil pH in mountains and in basins, which might reflect differences in evolutionary processes of various habitats. In summary, our research systematically analyzed the correlation of species richness in regional and local scales in Xinjiang which provides more insights into the understanding of species pool hypothesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus