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Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi TcII and TcI in free-ranging population of lion tamarins (Leontopithecus spp): an 11-year follow-up.

Lisboa CV, Monteiro RV, Martins AF, Xavier SC, Lima Vdos S, Jansen AM - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we present a review of the dataset resulting from the 11-years follow-up of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in free-ranging populations of Leontopithecus rosalia (golden lion tamarin) and Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin) from distinct forest fragments in Atlantic Coastal Rainforest.DTU TcII was found to exclusively infect primates, while TcI infected Didelphis aurita and lion tamarins.We concluded the following: (i) the transmission cycle of T. cruzi in a same host species and forest fragment is modified over time, (ii) the infectivity competence of the golden lion tamarin population fluctuates in waves that peak every other year and (iii) both golden and golden-headed lion tamarins are able to maintain long-lasting infections by TcII and TcI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
Here, we present a review of the dataset resulting from the 11-years follow-up of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in free-ranging populations of Leontopithecus rosalia (golden lion tamarin) and Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin) from distinct forest fragments in Atlantic Coastal Rainforest. Additionally, we present new data regarding T. cruzi infection of small mammals (rodents and marsupials) that live in the same areas as golden lion tamarins and characterisation at discrete typing unit (DTU) level of 77 of these isolates. DTU TcII was found to exclusively infect primates, while TcI infected Didelphis aurita and lion tamarins. The majority of T. cruzi isolates derived from L. rosalia were shown to be TcII (33 out 42) Nine T. cruzi isolates displayed a TcI profile. Golden-headed lion tamarins demonstrated to be excellent reservoirs of TcII, as 24 of 26 T. cruzi isolates exhibited the TcII profile. We concluded the following: (i) the transmission cycle of T. cruzi in a same host species and forest fragment is modified over time, (ii) the infectivity competence of the golden lion tamarin population fluctuates in waves that peak every other year and (iii) both golden and golden-headed lion tamarins are able to maintain long-lasting infections by TcII and TcI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) of Poçodas Antas Biological Reserve, municipality of Silva Jardim, state of Rio deJaneiro, Brazil. Photo by Rodrigo Méxas (Oswaldo Cruz Institute/Oswaldo CruzFoundation).
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f04: the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) of Poçodas Antas Biological Reserve, municipality of Silva Jardim, state of Rio deJaneiro, Brazil. Photo by Rodrigo Méxas (Oswaldo Cruz Institute/Oswaldo CruzFoundation).

Mentions: The assemblage of our data showed that a stable transmission cycle of DTU TcII wasefficiently maintained in the wild environment by a free-ranging golden lion tamarin’spopulation for at least for 11 years (Fig. 4).Additionally, T. cruzi serum conversion (> 51%) and HC positivity oforiginally noninfected, re-examined tamarins demonstrated active transmission occurringthroughout our 11-year long follow-up period. This enzootic scenario confirms a verywell established and robust sylvatic transmission cycle of TcII, a DTU previouslyassociated with human infection, in the Atlantic Forest.


Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi TcII and TcI in free-ranging population of lion tamarins (Leontopithecus spp): an 11-year follow-up.

Lisboa CV, Monteiro RV, Martins AF, Xavier SC, Lima Vdos S, Jansen AM - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2015)

the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) of Poçodas Antas Biological Reserve, municipality of Silva Jardim, state of Rio deJaneiro, Brazil. Photo by Rodrigo Méxas (Oswaldo Cruz Institute/Oswaldo CruzFoundation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489477&req=5

f04: the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) of Poçodas Antas Biological Reserve, municipality of Silva Jardim, state of Rio deJaneiro, Brazil. Photo by Rodrigo Méxas (Oswaldo Cruz Institute/Oswaldo CruzFoundation).
Mentions: The assemblage of our data showed that a stable transmission cycle of DTU TcII wasefficiently maintained in the wild environment by a free-ranging golden lion tamarin’spopulation for at least for 11 years (Fig. 4).Additionally, T. cruzi serum conversion (> 51%) and HC positivity oforiginally noninfected, re-examined tamarins demonstrated active transmission occurringthroughout our 11-year long follow-up period. This enzootic scenario confirms a verywell established and robust sylvatic transmission cycle of TcII, a DTU previouslyassociated with human infection, in the Atlantic Forest.

Bottom Line: Here, we present a review of the dataset resulting from the 11-years follow-up of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in free-ranging populations of Leontopithecus rosalia (golden lion tamarin) and Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin) from distinct forest fragments in Atlantic Coastal Rainforest.DTU TcII was found to exclusively infect primates, while TcI infected Didelphis aurita and lion tamarins.We concluded the following: (i) the transmission cycle of T. cruzi in a same host species and forest fragment is modified over time, (ii) the infectivity competence of the golden lion tamarin population fluctuates in waves that peak every other year and (iii) both golden and golden-headed lion tamarins are able to maintain long-lasting infections by TcII and TcI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
Here, we present a review of the dataset resulting from the 11-years follow-up of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in free-ranging populations of Leontopithecus rosalia (golden lion tamarin) and Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin) from distinct forest fragments in Atlantic Coastal Rainforest. Additionally, we present new data regarding T. cruzi infection of small mammals (rodents and marsupials) that live in the same areas as golden lion tamarins and characterisation at discrete typing unit (DTU) level of 77 of these isolates. DTU TcII was found to exclusively infect primates, while TcI infected Didelphis aurita and lion tamarins. The majority of T. cruzi isolates derived from L. rosalia were shown to be TcII (33 out 42) Nine T. cruzi isolates displayed a TcI profile. Golden-headed lion tamarins demonstrated to be excellent reservoirs of TcII, as 24 of 26 T. cruzi isolates exhibited the TcII profile. We concluded the following: (i) the transmission cycle of T. cruzi in a same host species and forest fragment is modified over time, (ii) the infectivity competence of the golden lion tamarin population fluctuates in waves that peak every other year and (iii) both golden and golden-headed lion tamarins are able to maintain long-lasting infections by TcII and TcI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus