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Presence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Is Not Associated with Microalbuminuria in 14-to-20-Years Old Slovak Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional, Population Study.

Gurecká R, Koborová I, Šebek J, Šebeková K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Prevalence of microalbuminuria in both genders reached 3.3%, and did not differ significantly between lean and centrally obese subjects.Results obtained in this study do not support our assumption that ACR associates with cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy adolescents.Follow-up studies until adulthood are needed to estimate the potential cardiometabolic risk of apparently healthy microalbuminuric adolescents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular BioMedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In adults, microalbuminuria indicates generalized endothelial dysfunction, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all cause mortality. Slovak adults present one of the highest cardiovascular mortality rates in Europe. Thus Slovak adolescents are on a high-risk to develop cardiovascular afflictions early, and screening for microalbuminuria might be useful in early assessment of their cardiovascular risk. We aimed to study the prevalence of microalbuminuria in Slovak adolescents, and the association of urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) to cardiovascular risk factors.

Subjects and methods: Anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood count, glucose homeostasis, lipid profile, renal function, inflammatory status, concentrations of homocysteine and uric acid were determined and associated with ACR in 2 666 adolescents (49.4% boys, 51.6% girls) aged 14-to-20 years. Microalbuminuria was classified as ACR 2.5-25.0 mg/mmol in boys and 3.5-35.0 mg/mmol in girls.

Results: Prevalence of microalbuminuria in both genders reached 3.3%, and did not differ significantly between lean and centrally obese subjects. Girls presented higher ACR than boys (normoalbuminuric: 0.6 ± 0.5 mg/mmol vs. 0.5 ± 0.4 mg/mmol, p > 0.001; microalbuminuric: 9.3 ± 7.3 mg/mmol vs. 5.0 ± 3.8 mg/mmol; p > 0.001). Microalbuminuric adolescents and those presenting normoalbuminuria within the upper ACR quartile were slimmer than their normoalbuminuric counterparts or adolescents with normoalbuminuria within the lower quartile, respectively. No association between microalbuminuria and cardiovascular risk markers was revealed.

Conclusion: Results obtained in this study do not support our assumption that ACR associates with cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy adolescents. Follow-up studies until adulthood are needed to estimate the potential cardiometabolic risk of apparently healthy microalbuminuric adolescents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Albumin-to-creatinine ratio in lean and centrally obese boys.a/ whole cohort; b/ normoalbuminuric boys; c/ microalbuminuric boys. ACR:urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio; CO: centrally obese subjects; box plotindicates quartiles and whiskers the 5th and the 95thpercentiles.
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pone.0129311.g004: Albumin-to-creatinine ratio in lean and centrally obese boys.a/ whole cohort; b/ normoalbuminuric boys; c/ microalbuminuric boys. ACR:urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio; CO: centrally obese subjects; box plotindicates quartiles and whiskers the 5th and the 95thpercentiles.

Mentions: Eleven point four percent of boys presented central obesity (waist-to-heightratio: 0.55±0.04 vs. 0.42±0.03, respectively; p<0.001). ACRdid not differ significantly in lean versus centrally obese boys in the whole(Fig 4a), andnormoalbuminuric cohorts (Fig4b; waist-to-height ratio: 0.43±0.03 vs. 0.55±0.04,respectively; p<0.001), while centrally obese microalbuminuric boyspresented significantly lower ACR if compared with their lean counterparts (Fig 4c; waist-to-height ratio0.52±0.01 vs. 0.42±0.03, respectively; p<0.001).


Presence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Is Not Associated with Microalbuminuria in 14-to-20-Years Old Slovak Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional, Population Study.

Gurecká R, Koborová I, Šebek J, Šebeková K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Albumin-to-creatinine ratio in lean and centrally obese boys.a/ whole cohort; b/ normoalbuminuric boys; c/ microalbuminuric boys. ACR:urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio; CO: centrally obese subjects; box plotindicates quartiles and whiskers the 5th and the 95thpercentiles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489371&req=5

pone.0129311.g004: Albumin-to-creatinine ratio in lean and centrally obese boys.a/ whole cohort; b/ normoalbuminuric boys; c/ microalbuminuric boys. ACR:urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio; CO: centrally obese subjects; box plotindicates quartiles and whiskers the 5th and the 95thpercentiles.
Mentions: Eleven point four percent of boys presented central obesity (waist-to-heightratio: 0.55±0.04 vs. 0.42±0.03, respectively; p<0.001). ACRdid not differ significantly in lean versus centrally obese boys in the whole(Fig 4a), andnormoalbuminuric cohorts (Fig4b; waist-to-height ratio: 0.43±0.03 vs. 0.55±0.04,respectively; p<0.001), while centrally obese microalbuminuric boyspresented significantly lower ACR if compared with their lean counterparts (Fig 4c; waist-to-height ratio0.52±0.01 vs. 0.42±0.03, respectively; p<0.001).

Bottom Line: Prevalence of microalbuminuria in both genders reached 3.3%, and did not differ significantly between lean and centrally obese subjects.Results obtained in this study do not support our assumption that ACR associates with cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy adolescents.Follow-up studies until adulthood are needed to estimate the potential cardiometabolic risk of apparently healthy microalbuminuric adolescents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular BioMedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In adults, microalbuminuria indicates generalized endothelial dysfunction, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all cause mortality. Slovak adults present one of the highest cardiovascular mortality rates in Europe. Thus Slovak adolescents are on a high-risk to develop cardiovascular afflictions early, and screening for microalbuminuria might be useful in early assessment of their cardiovascular risk. We aimed to study the prevalence of microalbuminuria in Slovak adolescents, and the association of urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) to cardiovascular risk factors.

Subjects and methods: Anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood count, glucose homeostasis, lipid profile, renal function, inflammatory status, concentrations of homocysteine and uric acid were determined and associated with ACR in 2 666 adolescents (49.4% boys, 51.6% girls) aged 14-to-20 years. Microalbuminuria was classified as ACR 2.5-25.0 mg/mmol in boys and 3.5-35.0 mg/mmol in girls.

Results: Prevalence of microalbuminuria in both genders reached 3.3%, and did not differ significantly between lean and centrally obese subjects. Girls presented higher ACR than boys (normoalbuminuric: 0.6 ± 0.5 mg/mmol vs. 0.5 ± 0.4 mg/mmol, p > 0.001; microalbuminuric: 9.3 ± 7.3 mg/mmol vs. 5.0 ± 3.8 mg/mmol; p > 0.001). Microalbuminuric adolescents and those presenting normoalbuminuria within the upper ACR quartile were slimmer than their normoalbuminuric counterparts or adolescents with normoalbuminuria within the lower quartile, respectively. No association between microalbuminuria and cardiovascular risk markers was revealed.

Conclusion: Results obtained in this study do not support our assumption that ACR associates with cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy adolescents. Follow-up studies until adulthood are needed to estimate the potential cardiometabolic risk of apparently healthy microalbuminuric adolescents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus