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The incidence of acute pancreatitis: impact of social deprivation, alcohol consumption, seasonal and demographic factors.

Roberts SE, Akbari A, Thorne K, Atkinson M, Evans PA - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. (2013)

Bottom Line: Incidence increased significantly from 27.6 per 100,000 in 1999 to 36.4 in 2010 (average annual increase = 2.7% per year), there was little trend in mortality (0.2% average annual reduction).The largest increases in incidence were among women aged <35 years (7.9% per year) and men aged 35-44 (5.7%) and 45-54 (5.3%).Alcoholic admissions were increased with higher consumption of spirits and beer, but not wine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, UK. stephen.e.roberts@swansea.ac.uk

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Incidence of acute pancreatitis (per 100 000 population) according to social deprivation quintile (I = most affluent, V = most deprived) in Wales from 1999 to 2010 for (a) All acute pancreatitis. (b) Gallstone and alcoholic acute pancreatitis. Incidence is standardised for age group and gender. Vertical bars represent 95% confidence intervals.
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fig03: Incidence of acute pancreatitis (per 100 000 population) according to social deprivation quintile (I = most affluent, V = most deprived) in Wales from 1999 to 2010 for (a) All acute pancreatitis. (b) Gallstone and alcoholic acute pancreatitis. Incidence is standardised for age group and gender. Vertical bars represent 95% confidence intervals.

Mentions: The incidence of acute pancreatitis was 1.9 times higher (95% CI = 1.8–2.0) among the most deprived quintile of patients compared with the most affluent quintile (Figure3a). Figure3b shows that this association between acute pancreatitis and social deprivation was much stronger for alcoholic aetiology (3.9; 95% CI = 3.4–4.5) than for gallstone aetiology (1.5; 1.4–1.7), or for all other and unspecified aetiologies (1.6; 95% CI = 1.4–1.7).


The incidence of acute pancreatitis: impact of social deprivation, alcohol consumption, seasonal and demographic factors.

Roberts SE, Akbari A, Thorne K, Atkinson M, Evans PA - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. (2013)

Incidence of acute pancreatitis (per 100 000 population) according to social deprivation quintile (I = most affluent, V = most deprived) in Wales from 1999 to 2010 for (a) All acute pancreatitis. (b) Gallstone and alcoholic acute pancreatitis. Incidence is standardised for age group and gender. Vertical bars represent 95% confidence intervals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489350&req=5

fig03: Incidence of acute pancreatitis (per 100 000 population) according to social deprivation quintile (I = most affluent, V = most deprived) in Wales from 1999 to 2010 for (a) All acute pancreatitis. (b) Gallstone and alcoholic acute pancreatitis. Incidence is standardised for age group and gender. Vertical bars represent 95% confidence intervals.
Mentions: The incidence of acute pancreatitis was 1.9 times higher (95% CI = 1.8–2.0) among the most deprived quintile of patients compared with the most affluent quintile (Figure3a). Figure3b shows that this association between acute pancreatitis and social deprivation was much stronger for alcoholic aetiology (3.9; 95% CI = 3.4–4.5) than for gallstone aetiology (1.5; 1.4–1.7), or for all other and unspecified aetiologies (1.6; 95% CI = 1.4–1.7).

Bottom Line: Incidence increased significantly from 27.6 per 100,000 in 1999 to 36.4 in 2010 (average annual increase = 2.7% per year), there was little trend in mortality (0.2% average annual reduction).The largest increases in incidence were among women aged <35 years (7.9% per year) and men aged 35-44 (5.7%) and 45-54 (5.3%).Alcoholic admissions were increased with higher consumption of spirits and beer, but not wine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, UK. stephen.e.roberts@swansea.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus