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Managerial practices and factors influencing reproductive performance of dairy cows in urban/peri-urban areas of Kampala and Gulu, Uganda.

Benon KM, Owiny DO, Båge R, Nassuna-Musoke MG, Humblot P, Magnusson U - Acta Vet. Scand. (2015)

Bottom Line: Neonatal calf mortality was lower (P = 0.01) in small herds.The study showed significant differences between Kampala and Gulu in reproductive performance and related husbandry factors for cows in the urban/peri-urban dairy farming systems.For several reproductive performance traits we found associations with husbandry and production traits, which should be taken into account when providing advice to the urban and peri-urban dairy farmers in the tropics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda. bkanyima@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Urban/peri-urban dairy production and sales has evolved as an adjustment to cope with food security and economic needs for urban dwellers in low-income countries and created an opportunity to transform from subsistence rural lifestyles of dairy farming to commercial engagement in towns. However, urban/peri-urban dairy farms differ in challenges from rural dairy farms and reproduction is important and critical for assuring sustainable economic output in both environments. Here we recorded for the first time differences between two geographically and economically different cities corresponding to different settings within the same country in managerial factors influencing reproductive performance in urban/peri-urban dairy cowherds.

Results: The urban/peri-urban dairy farmers in the capital Kampala were more often male (P = 0.002) and commercialized (P = 0.0025), more experienced (P = 0.0001) and practiced zero-grazing more often (P = 0.05) than in the regional municipality Gulu. Also, the milk production per herd and cow (P = 0.0005) and calving rate were (P = 0.0001) higher in Kampala and artificial insemination was more commonly (P = 0.002) used than in Gulu. There was no difference in abortion nor neonatal mortality rate between the two locations. Overall, calving rates were higher (P = 0.0003) in smaller (≤3 dairy cows) and open grazing (P = 0.003) herds. Abortion rates were higher among dairy herds practicing late (≥5 months) (P = 0.003) calf weaning and in herds with commercial purposes (P = 0.0001). Neonatal calf mortality was lower (P = 0.01) in small herds.

Conclusion: The study showed significant differences between Kampala and Gulu in reproductive performance and related husbandry factors for cows in the urban/peri-urban dairy farming systems. For several reproductive performance traits we found associations with husbandry and production traits, which should be taken into account when providing advice to the urban and peri-urban dairy farmers in the tropics.

No MeSH data available.


Map of the study areas in Gulu and Kampala, Uganda
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Map of the study areas in Gulu and Kampala, Uganda

Mentions: Dairy farming households were selected by convenience from typical dairy farmers where appropriate data could be collected in UPU Kampala and Gulu. Data on household socio-economic position, the geographical locations (Fig. 1), dairy cow husbandry, herd management practices and reproductive performance were collected at household visits by direct questioning, discussion and observations using a structured protocol and a pre-designed questionnaire. The visits in Kampala were performed by one artificial insemination technician, a veterinary student or the first author (BMK) and in Gulu by two field veterinarians, three husbandry officers or two artificial insemination technicians. All animals included in the study were treated according to the ethical standards of Makerere University. The farmers were informed about the purpose of the study and their oral consent was sought prior to their participation in the study.Fig. 1


Managerial practices and factors influencing reproductive performance of dairy cows in urban/peri-urban areas of Kampala and Gulu, Uganda.

Benon KM, Owiny DO, Båge R, Nassuna-Musoke MG, Humblot P, Magnusson U - Acta Vet. Scand. (2015)

Map of the study areas in Gulu and Kampala, Uganda
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489116&req=5

Fig1: Map of the study areas in Gulu and Kampala, Uganda
Mentions: Dairy farming households were selected by convenience from typical dairy farmers where appropriate data could be collected in UPU Kampala and Gulu. Data on household socio-economic position, the geographical locations (Fig. 1), dairy cow husbandry, herd management practices and reproductive performance were collected at household visits by direct questioning, discussion and observations using a structured protocol and a pre-designed questionnaire. The visits in Kampala were performed by one artificial insemination technician, a veterinary student or the first author (BMK) and in Gulu by two field veterinarians, three husbandry officers or two artificial insemination technicians. All animals included in the study were treated according to the ethical standards of Makerere University. The farmers were informed about the purpose of the study and their oral consent was sought prior to their participation in the study.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Neonatal calf mortality was lower (P = 0.01) in small herds.The study showed significant differences between Kampala and Gulu in reproductive performance and related husbandry factors for cows in the urban/peri-urban dairy farming systems.For several reproductive performance traits we found associations with husbandry and production traits, which should be taken into account when providing advice to the urban and peri-urban dairy farmers in the tropics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda. bkanyima@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Urban/peri-urban dairy production and sales has evolved as an adjustment to cope with food security and economic needs for urban dwellers in low-income countries and created an opportunity to transform from subsistence rural lifestyles of dairy farming to commercial engagement in towns. However, urban/peri-urban dairy farms differ in challenges from rural dairy farms and reproduction is important and critical for assuring sustainable economic output in both environments. Here we recorded for the first time differences between two geographically and economically different cities corresponding to different settings within the same country in managerial factors influencing reproductive performance in urban/peri-urban dairy cowherds.

Results: The urban/peri-urban dairy farmers in the capital Kampala were more often male (P = 0.002) and commercialized (P = 0.0025), more experienced (P = 0.0001) and practiced zero-grazing more often (P = 0.05) than in the regional municipality Gulu. Also, the milk production per herd and cow (P = 0.0005) and calving rate were (P = 0.0001) higher in Kampala and artificial insemination was more commonly (P = 0.002) used than in Gulu. There was no difference in abortion nor neonatal mortality rate between the two locations. Overall, calving rates were higher (P = 0.0003) in smaller (≤3 dairy cows) and open grazing (P = 0.003) herds. Abortion rates were higher among dairy herds practicing late (≥5 months) (P = 0.003) calf weaning and in herds with commercial purposes (P = 0.0001). Neonatal calf mortality was lower (P = 0.01) in small herds.

Conclusion: The study showed significant differences between Kampala and Gulu in reproductive performance and related husbandry factors for cows in the urban/peri-urban dairy farming systems. For several reproductive performance traits we found associations with husbandry and production traits, which should be taken into account when providing advice to the urban and peri-urban dairy farmers in the tropics.

No MeSH data available.