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A Positive Affective Neuroendocrinology Approach to Reward and Behavioral Dysregulation.

Welker KM, Gruber J, Mehta PH - Front Psychiatry (2015)

Bottom Line: Additionally, the PANE framework holds that reward processing mediates the effects of testosterone on behavioral dysregulation.We also explore sources of potential sex differences and the roles of age, cortisol, and individual differences within the PANE framework.Finally, we discuss future prospects for research questions and methodology in the emerging field of affective neuroendocrinology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder, CO , USA.

ABSTRACT
Emerging lines of research suggest that both testosterone and maladaptive reward processing can modulate behavioral dysregulation. Yet, to date, no integrative account has been provided that systematically explains neuroendocrine function, dysregulation of reward, and behavioral dysregulation in a unified perspective. This is particularly important given specific neuroendocrine systems are potential mechanisms underlying and giving rise to reward-relevant behaviors. In this review, we propose a forward-thinking approach to study the mechanisms of reward and behavioral dysregulation from a positive affective neuroendocrinology (PANE) perspective. This approach holds that testosterone increases reward processing and motivation, which increase the likelihood of behavioral dysregulation. Additionally, the PANE framework holds that reward processing mediates the effects of testosterone on behavioral dysregulation. We also explore sources of potential sex differences and the roles of age, cortisol, and individual differences within the PANE framework. Finally, we discuss future prospects for research questions and methodology in the emerging field of affective neuroendocrinology.

No MeSH data available.


The PANE framework of reward and behavioral dysregulation. The PANE framework specifies that elevated stable levels and dynamic increases of testosterone facilitate increased reward function. This increased reward function then facilitates behavioral dysregulation and behaviors indicative of excessive reward pursuit. This perspective also allows for the possibility that reward function can increase testosterone.
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Figure 2: The PANE framework of reward and behavioral dysregulation. The PANE framework specifies that elevated stable levels and dynamic increases of testosterone facilitate increased reward function. This increased reward function then facilitates behavioral dysregulation and behaviors indicative of excessive reward pursuit. This perspective also allows for the possibility that reward function can increase testosterone.

Mentions: The PANE framework provides an organizing framework of existing research showing that the association between testosterone and behavioral dysregulation is mediated by increased reward motivation and reward dysregulation (see Figure 2). Specifically, the PANE approach primarily holds that both stable, trait-like levels and moment-to-moment dynamic changes in testosterone can increase reward dysregulation. Enhanced reward processing – a psychological and neural mechanism of behavioral dysregulation – then increases the likelihood of behavioral dysregulation. Because reward function is affected by testosterone and also serves as a key mechanism of behavioral dysregulation, we argue that reward function is a prime candidate for a mediator of the association between testosterone and behavioral dysregulation. Consistent with contemporary accounts of mediation (188), by specifying reward function as a mediator of the association between testosterone and behavioral dysregulation, we mean that reward function is a causal mechanism in this association. As we review above, testosterone and reward function and motivation modulate a common set of reward-dependent behaviors, and well-established causal directions among testosterone, reward, and behavioral dysregulation suggest that this network of relations is mediated.


A Positive Affective Neuroendocrinology Approach to Reward and Behavioral Dysregulation.

Welker KM, Gruber J, Mehta PH - Front Psychiatry (2015)

The PANE framework of reward and behavioral dysregulation. The PANE framework specifies that elevated stable levels and dynamic increases of testosterone facilitate increased reward function. This increased reward function then facilitates behavioral dysregulation and behaviors indicative of excessive reward pursuit. This perspective also allows for the possibility that reward function can increase testosterone.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489099&req=5

Figure 2: The PANE framework of reward and behavioral dysregulation. The PANE framework specifies that elevated stable levels and dynamic increases of testosterone facilitate increased reward function. This increased reward function then facilitates behavioral dysregulation and behaviors indicative of excessive reward pursuit. This perspective also allows for the possibility that reward function can increase testosterone.
Mentions: The PANE framework provides an organizing framework of existing research showing that the association between testosterone and behavioral dysregulation is mediated by increased reward motivation and reward dysregulation (see Figure 2). Specifically, the PANE approach primarily holds that both stable, trait-like levels and moment-to-moment dynamic changes in testosterone can increase reward dysregulation. Enhanced reward processing – a psychological and neural mechanism of behavioral dysregulation – then increases the likelihood of behavioral dysregulation. Because reward function is affected by testosterone and also serves as a key mechanism of behavioral dysregulation, we argue that reward function is a prime candidate for a mediator of the association between testosterone and behavioral dysregulation. Consistent with contemporary accounts of mediation (188), by specifying reward function as a mediator of the association between testosterone and behavioral dysregulation, we mean that reward function is a causal mechanism in this association. As we review above, testosterone and reward function and motivation modulate a common set of reward-dependent behaviors, and well-established causal directions among testosterone, reward, and behavioral dysregulation suggest that this network of relations is mediated.

Bottom Line: Additionally, the PANE framework holds that reward processing mediates the effects of testosterone on behavioral dysregulation.We also explore sources of potential sex differences and the roles of age, cortisol, and individual differences within the PANE framework.Finally, we discuss future prospects for research questions and methodology in the emerging field of affective neuroendocrinology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder, CO , USA.

ABSTRACT
Emerging lines of research suggest that both testosterone and maladaptive reward processing can modulate behavioral dysregulation. Yet, to date, no integrative account has been provided that systematically explains neuroendocrine function, dysregulation of reward, and behavioral dysregulation in a unified perspective. This is particularly important given specific neuroendocrine systems are potential mechanisms underlying and giving rise to reward-relevant behaviors. In this review, we propose a forward-thinking approach to study the mechanisms of reward and behavioral dysregulation from a positive affective neuroendocrinology (PANE) perspective. This approach holds that testosterone increases reward processing and motivation, which increase the likelihood of behavioral dysregulation. Additionally, the PANE framework holds that reward processing mediates the effects of testosterone on behavioral dysregulation. We also explore sources of potential sex differences and the roles of age, cortisol, and individual differences within the PANE framework. Finally, we discuss future prospects for research questions and methodology in the emerging field of affective neuroendocrinology.

No MeSH data available.