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A New Oviraptorid Dinosaur (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the Late Cretaceous of Southern China and Its Paleobiogeographical Implications.

Lü J, Pu H, Kobayashi Y, Xu L, Chang H, Shang Y, Liu D, Lee YN, Kundrát M, Shen C - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: A phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as closely related to the Mongolian Citipati.Six oviraptorid dinosaurs from the Nanxiong Formation (Ganzhou and Nanxiong) are distributed within three clades of the family.Each of the three clades from the Nanxiong Formation has close relatives in Inner Mongolia and Mongolia, and in both places each clade may have had a specific diet or occupied a different ecological niche.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China; Key Lab of Stratigraphy and Paleontology, Ministry of Land and Resources of China, Beijing 100037, China.

ABSTRACT
The Ganzhou area of Jiangxi Province, southern China is becoming one of the most productive oviraptorosaurian localities in the world. A new oviraptorid dinosaur was unearthed from the uppermost Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou area. It is characterized by an anterodorsally sloping occiput and quadrate (a feature shared with Citipati), a circular supratemporal fenestra that is much smaller than the lower temporal fenestra, and a dentary in which the dorsal margin above the external mandibular fenestra is strongly concave ventrally. The position of the anteroventral corner of the external naris in relation to the posterodorsal corner of the antorbital fenestra provides new insight into the craniofacial evolution of oviraptorosaurid dinosaurs. A phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as closely related to the Mongolian Citipati. Six oviraptorid dinosaurs from the Nanxiong Formation (Ganzhou and Nanxiong) are distributed within three clades of the family. Each of the three clades from the Nanxiong Formation has close relatives in Inner Mongolia and Mongolia, and in both places each clade may have had a specific diet or occupied a different ecological niche. Oviraptorid dinosaurs were geographically widespread across Asia in the latest Cretaceous and were an important component of terrestrial ecosystems during this time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of the fossil locality near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The five-pointed star represents the fossil site. Modified from Lü et al.26
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f1: Map of the fossil locality near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The five-pointed star represents the fossil site. Modified from Lü et al.26

Mentions: Oviraptorosaurs are an unusual group of feathered dinosaurs, which are easily distinguished from other maniraptoran theropods by their unique skull and ischial morphologies. Basal forms such as Caudipteryx1 have teeth, whereas derived members of the clade are united by synapomorphies such as loss of the teeth, short skulls, variable presence of the bony crest, and pneumatic anterior caudal vertebrae2. Skeletally mature oviraptorosaurs ranged in size from the turkey-sized Caudipteryx1 to the 8-meter long Gigantoraptor3. Since the first discovery of Oviraptor in 19244, more than thirty genera have been reported. They are mainly from the Cretaceous of Asia34567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829 and North America30313233343536373839. The Chinese oviraptorosaurs are mostly from the Lower Cretaceous deposits of western Liaoning Province and the Upper Cretaceous deposits of Inner Mongolia (northern China), the upper Lower Cretaceous of the Ruyang Basin and uppermost Cretaceous of the Tantou Basin in Henan Province (central China), and the Upper Cretaceous deposits of the Heyuan and Nanxiong basins of Guangdong Province and the Ganzhou district of Jiangxi Province (southern China). Until now, four genera of oviraptorosaurs have been reported from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou City, Jiangxi Province of southern China: Banji21, Ganzhousaurus28, Jiangxisaurus29 and Nankangia26. Within an area of about 40 square kilometers, more than 200 oviraptorosaurian nests with eggs have been discovered in the Ganzhou region40. They did not come from a single quarry but they are mainly from Longling village of Nankang City, and sites near the Ganzhou Railway Station, and the third high school of Ganxian, Ganzhou City; some nests contain eggs with embryos inside them41. In addition to remains of the oviraptorosaur skeletons, lizards and other dinosaurs, including the large sauropod Gannansaurus sinensis42 and the tyrannosaurid Qianzhousaurus sinensis43, have also been excavated from the Nanxiong Formation of the Ganzhou area. A new oviraptorid taxon was unearthed from the current construction site of the Ganzhou Railway Station (Fig. 1). The new specimen reported herein is from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province. It is distinctive from any other reported oviraptorosaurs from southern China, but does show some similarities to the Mongolian oviraptorid Citipati.


A New Oviraptorid Dinosaur (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the Late Cretaceous of Southern China and Its Paleobiogeographical Implications.

Lü J, Pu H, Kobayashi Y, Xu L, Chang H, Shang Y, Liu D, Lee YN, Kundrát M, Shen C - Sci Rep (2015)

Map of the fossil locality near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The five-pointed star represents the fossil site. Modified from Lü et al.26
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489096&req=5

f1: Map of the fossil locality near Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, southern China.The five-pointed star represents the fossil site. Modified from Lü et al.26
Mentions: Oviraptorosaurs are an unusual group of feathered dinosaurs, which are easily distinguished from other maniraptoran theropods by their unique skull and ischial morphologies. Basal forms such as Caudipteryx1 have teeth, whereas derived members of the clade are united by synapomorphies such as loss of the teeth, short skulls, variable presence of the bony crest, and pneumatic anterior caudal vertebrae2. Skeletally mature oviraptorosaurs ranged in size from the turkey-sized Caudipteryx1 to the 8-meter long Gigantoraptor3. Since the first discovery of Oviraptor in 19244, more than thirty genera have been reported. They are mainly from the Cretaceous of Asia34567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829 and North America30313233343536373839. The Chinese oviraptorosaurs are mostly from the Lower Cretaceous deposits of western Liaoning Province and the Upper Cretaceous deposits of Inner Mongolia (northern China), the upper Lower Cretaceous of the Ruyang Basin and uppermost Cretaceous of the Tantou Basin in Henan Province (central China), and the Upper Cretaceous deposits of the Heyuan and Nanxiong basins of Guangdong Province and the Ganzhou district of Jiangxi Province (southern China). Until now, four genera of oviraptorosaurs have been reported from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou City, Jiangxi Province of southern China: Banji21, Ganzhousaurus28, Jiangxisaurus29 and Nankangia26. Within an area of about 40 square kilometers, more than 200 oviraptorosaurian nests with eggs have been discovered in the Ganzhou region40. They did not come from a single quarry but they are mainly from Longling village of Nankang City, and sites near the Ganzhou Railway Station, and the third high school of Ganxian, Ganzhou City; some nests contain eggs with embryos inside them41. In addition to remains of the oviraptorosaur skeletons, lizards and other dinosaurs, including the large sauropod Gannansaurus sinensis42 and the tyrannosaurid Qianzhousaurus sinensis43, have also been excavated from the Nanxiong Formation of the Ganzhou area. A new oviraptorid taxon was unearthed from the current construction site of the Ganzhou Railway Station (Fig. 1). The new specimen reported herein is from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province. It is distinctive from any other reported oviraptorosaurs from southern China, but does show some similarities to the Mongolian oviraptorid Citipati.

Bottom Line: A phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as closely related to the Mongolian Citipati.Six oviraptorid dinosaurs from the Nanxiong Formation (Ganzhou and Nanxiong) are distributed within three clades of the family.Each of the three clades from the Nanxiong Formation has close relatives in Inner Mongolia and Mongolia, and in both places each clade may have had a specific diet or occupied a different ecological niche.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China; Key Lab of Stratigraphy and Paleontology, Ministry of Land and Resources of China, Beijing 100037, China.

ABSTRACT
The Ganzhou area of Jiangxi Province, southern China is becoming one of the most productive oviraptorosaurian localities in the world. A new oviraptorid dinosaur was unearthed from the uppermost Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou area. It is characterized by an anterodorsally sloping occiput and quadrate (a feature shared with Citipati), a circular supratemporal fenestra that is much smaller than the lower temporal fenestra, and a dentary in which the dorsal margin above the external mandibular fenestra is strongly concave ventrally. The position of the anteroventral corner of the external naris in relation to the posterodorsal corner of the antorbital fenestra provides new insight into the craniofacial evolution of oviraptorosaurid dinosaurs. A phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as closely related to the Mongolian Citipati. Six oviraptorid dinosaurs from the Nanxiong Formation (Ganzhou and Nanxiong) are distributed within three clades of the family. Each of the three clades from the Nanxiong Formation has close relatives in Inner Mongolia and Mongolia, and in both places each clade may have had a specific diet or occupied a different ecological niche. Oviraptorid dinosaurs were geographically widespread across Asia in the latest Cretaceous and were an important component of terrestrial ecosystems during this time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus