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Remodeling the Dendritic Spines in the Hindlimb Representation of the Sensory Cortex after Spinal Cord Hemisection in Mice.

Zhang K, Zhang J, Zhou Y, Chen C, Li W, Ma L, Zhang L, Zhao J, Gan W, Zhang L, Tang P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In comparison to the control group and contralateral cortex in the SCI group, the re-emerging rate of eliminated spines in ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group decreased significantly.The stable rates of newly formed spines in bilateral cortices of the SCI group decreased from two weeks to one month.In addition, it also made the new formed spines unstable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing, 100853, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce remodeling of multiple levels of the cerebral cortex system especially in the sensory cortex. The aim of this study was to assess, in vivo and bilaterally, the remodeling of dendritic spines in the hindlimb representation of the sensory cortex after spinal cord hemisection. Thy1-YFP transgenic mice were randomly divided into the control group and the SCI group, and the spinal vertebral plates (T11-T12) of all mice were excised. Next, the left hemisphere of the spinal cord (T12) was hemisected in the SCI group. The hindlimb representations of the sensory cortex in both groups were imaged bilaterally on the day before (0d), and three days (3d), two weeks (2w), and one month (1m) after the SCI. The rates of stable, newly formed, and eliminated spines were calculated by comparing images of individual dendritic spine in the same areas at different time points. In comparison to the control group, the rate of newly formed spines in the contralateral sensory cortex of the SCI group increased at three days and two weeks after injury. The rates of eliminated spines in the bilateral sensory cortices increased and the rate of stable spines in the bilateral cortices declined at two weeks and one month. From three days to two weeks, the stable rates of bilaterally stable spines in the SCI group decreased. In comparison to the control group and contralateral cortex in the SCI group, the re-emerging rate of eliminated spines in ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group decreased significantly. The stable rates of newly formed spines in bilateral cortices of the SCI group decreased from two weeks to one month. We found that the remodeling in the hindlimb representation of the sensory cortex after spinal cord hemisection occurred bilaterally. This remodeling included eliminating spines and forming new spines, as well as changing the reorganized regions of the brain cortex after the SCI over time. Soon after the SCI, the cortex was remodeled by increasing spine formation in the contralateral cortex. Then it was remodeled prominently by eliminating spines of bilateral cortices. Spinal cord hemisection also caused traditional stable spines to become unstable and led the eliminated spines even more hard to recur especially in the ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group. In addition, it also made the new formed spines unstable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

No significant difference between the bilateral sensory cortices of the hindlimb in control group over time.Remodeling of the dendritic spines in the hindlimb sensory cortex in (A) 3 days, (B) 2 weeks, and (C) 1 month. All data are presented as the mean ± SEM. n: the number of mice. * P < 0.05 vs each other.
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pone.0132077.g006: No significant difference between the bilateral sensory cortices of the hindlimb in control group over time.Remodeling of the dendritic spines in the hindlimb sensory cortex in (A) 3 days, (B) 2 weeks, and (C) 1 month. All data are presented as the mean ± SEM. n: the number of mice. * P < 0.05 vs each other.

Mentions: The rates of stable, eliminated and newly formed spines in bilateral cortices in control group have no significant difference over one month (three days: stable spine, 88.7 ± 1.8% versus 89.2 ± 1.6%, t-test, P = 0.84,; elimination spines, 11.3± 1.8% versus 10.8 ± 1.6%, Mann-Whitney test, P > 0.05; formation spines, 5.4 ± 1.0% versus 5.8 ± 0.9%, Mann-Whitney test, P > 0.05, Fig 6A; two weeks: stable spine, 87.7 ± 1.7% versus 86.5 ± 1.3%, Mann-Whitney test P > 0.05; elimination spines, 12.3± 1.7% versus 13.5 ± 1.3%, Mann-Whitney test P > 0.05; formation spines, 7.3 ± 0.9% versus 7.5 ± 1.2%, t-test, P = 0.6569, Fig 6B; one month: stable spine, 85.4 ± 1.6% versus 83.5 ± 1.7%, t-test, P = 0.4368; elimination spines, 14.6 ± 1.6% versus 16.5 ± 1.7%, t-test, P = 0.7061; formation spines, 10.7 ± 1.6% versus 9.9 ± 1.4%, t-test, P = 0.725, Fig 6C).


Remodeling the Dendritic Spines in the Hindlimb Representation of the Sensory Cortex after Spinal Cord Hemisection in Mice.

Zhang K, Zhang J, Zhou Y, Chen C, Li W, Ma L, Zhang L, Zhao J, Gan W, Zhang L, Tang P - PLoS ONE (2015)

No significant difference between the bilateral sensory cortices of the hindlimb in control group over time.Remodeling of the dendritic spines in the hindlimb sensory cortex in (A) 3 days, (B) 2 weeks, and (C) 1 month. All data are presented as the mean ± SEM. n: the number of mice. * P < 0.05 vs each other.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489092&req=5

pone.0132077.g006: No significant difference between the bilateral sensory cortices of the hindlimb in control group over time.Remodeling of the dendritic spines in the hindlimb sensory cortex in (A) 3 days, (B) 2 weeks, and (C) 1 month. All data are presented as the mean ± SEM. n: the number of mice. * P < 0.05 vs each other.
Mentions: The rates of stable, eliminated and newly formed spines in bilateral cortices in control group have no significant difference over one month (three days: stable spine, 88.7 ± 1.8% versus 89.2 ± 1.6%, t-test, P = 0.84,; elimination spines, 11.3± 1.8% versus 10.8 ± 1.6%, Mann-Whitney test, P > 0.05; formation spines, 5.4 ± 1.0% versus 5.8 ± 0.9%, Mann-Whitney test, P > 0.05, Fig 6A; two weeks: stable spine, 87.7 ± 1.7% versus 86.5 ± 1.3%, Mann-Whitney test P > 0.05; elimination spines, 12.3± 1.7% versus 13.5 ± 1.3%, Mann-Whitney test P > 0.05; formation spines, 7.3 ± 0.9% versus 7.5 ± 1.2%, t-test, P = 0.6569, Fig 6B; one month: stable spine, 85.4 ± 1.6% versus 83.5 ± 1.7%, t-test, P = 0.4368; elimination spines, 14.6 ± 1.6% versus 16.5 ± 1.7%, t-test, P = 0.7061; formation spines, 10.7 ± 1.6% versus 9.9 ± 1.4%, t-test, P = 0.725, Fig 6C).

Bottom Line: In comparison to the control group and contralateral cortex in the SCI group, the re-emerging rate of eliminated spines in ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group decreased significantly.The stable rates of newly formed spines in bilateral cortices of the SCI group decreased from two weeks to one month.In addition, it also made the new formed spines unstable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing, 100853, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce remodeling of multiple levels of the cerebral cortex system especially in the sensory cortex. The aim of this study was to assess, in vivo and bilaterally, the remodeling of dendritic spines in the hindlimb representation of the sensory cortex after spinal cord hemisection. Thy1-YFP transgenic mice were randomly divided into the control group and the SCI group, and the spinal vertebral plates (T11-T12) of all mice were excised. Next, the left hemisphere of the spinal cord (T12) was hemisected in the SCI group. The hindlimb representations of the sensory cortex in both groups were imaged bilaterally on the day before (0d), and three days (3d), two weeks (2w), and one month (1m) after the SCI. The rates of stable, newly formed, and eliminated spines were calculated by comparing images of individual dendritic spine in the same areas at different time points. In comparison to the control group, the rate of newly formed spines in the contralateral sensory cortex of the SCI group increased at three days and two weeks after injury. The rates of eliminated spines in the bilateral sensory cortices increased and the rate of stable spines in the bilateral cortices declined at two weeks and one month. From three days to two weeks, the stable rates of bilaterally stable spines in the SCI group decreased. In comparison to the control group and contralateral cortex in the SCI group, the re-emerging rate of eliminated spines in ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group decreased significantly. The stable rates of newly formed spines in bilateral cortices of the SCI group decreased from two weeks to one month. We found that the remodeling in the hindlimb representation of the sensory cortex after spinal cord hemisection occurred bilaterally. This remodeling included eliminating spines and forming new spines, as well as changing the reorganized regions of the brain cortex after the SCI over time. Soon after the SCI, the cortex was remodeled by increasing spine formation in the contralateral cortex. Then it was remodeled prominently by eliminating spines of bilateral cortices. Spinal cord hemisection also caused traditional stable spines to become unstable and led the eliminated spines even more hard to recur especially in the ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group. In addition, it also made the new formed spines unstable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus