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The resurrection of Neohattoria Kamim. (Jubulaceae, Marchantiophyta): a six decade systematic conflict resolved through a molecular perspective.

Larraín J, Carter B, Shaw B, Hentschel J, Strozier LS, Furuki T, Heinrichs J, Crandall-Stotler B, Engel J, von Konrat M - PhytoKeys (2015)

Bottom Line: Over the years it has been interpreted as either a member of the genus Frullania or segregated into its own genus, Neohattoria, due to morphological similarities with both Frullania and Jubula.Here we provide molecular evidence that supports the recognition of the genus Neohattoria and its inclusion within the Jubulaceae, together with Jubula and Nipponolejeunea.Jubulaceae are placed sister to Lejeuneaceae rather than to the monogeneric Frullaniaceae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Science & Education, The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, U.S.A.

ABSTRACT
The systematic placement of Frullaniaherzogii has been contentious since its description six decades ago. Over the years it has been interpreted as either a member of the genus Frullania or segregated into its own genus, Neohattoria, due to morphological similarities with both Frullania and Jubula. Here we provide molecular evidence that supports the recognition of the genus Neohattoria and its inclusion within the Jubulaceae, together with Jubula and Nipponolejeunea. Jubulaceae are placed sister to Lejeuneaceae rather than to the monogeneric Frullaniaceae.

No MeSH data available.


Maximum likelihood (ML) tree showing the systematic position of Neohattoria relative to the Jubulaceae, Frullaniaceae and Lejeuneaceae. Wide black branches indicate ML bootstrap support > 90 % and PP > 0.95.
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Figure 1: Maximum likelihood (ML) tree showing the systematic position of Neohattoria relative to the Jubulaceae, Frullaniaceae and Lejeuneaceae. Wide black branches indicate ML bootstrap support > 90 % and PP > 0.95.

Mentions: The complete alignment for dataset 1 including all four regions mentioned above, with flanking areas pruned to avoid ambiguous readings, comprised 4818 characters for 54 accessions, of which 694 were parsimony informative. A total of 101 new sequences were generated for this study (Appendix 1). In the analysis of the Neohattoria sequences with accessions of the Frullaniaceae, Jubulaceae and Lejeuneaceae (dataset 1), Neohattoria is strongly supported (as defined by Pedersen et al. 2007) as one of three clades belonging to the Jubulaceae in both ML and Bayesian analyses, with accessions of Nipponolejeunea, resolved in a second clade and those of Jubula, in a third clade (Fig. 1), although the latter with low support (ML = 52, PP = 0.6). The Jubulaceae is resolved as sister to the Lejeuneaceae with strong support in both types of analysis. The position of the Frullaniaceae as sister to this latter clade (Jubulaceae + Lejeuneaceae) was strongly supported by the Bayesian analyses (PP = 1.0), but it was not recovered by the ML analyses. The Bayesian analyses also resolved Neohattoria as sister to the rest of the Jubulaceae (Nipponolejeunea + Jubula) with strong support (PP = 1.0).


The resurrection of Neohattoria Kamim. (Jubulaceae, Marchantiophyta): a six decade systematic conflict resolved through a molecular perspective.

Larraín J, Carter B, Shaw B, Hentschel J, Strozier LS, Furuki T, Heinrichs J, Crandall-Stotler B, Engel J, von Konrat M - PhytoKeys (2015)

Maximum likelihood (ML) tree showing the systematic position of Neohattoria relative to the Jubulaceae, Frullaniaceae and Lejeuneaceae. Wide black branches indicate ML bootstrap support > 90 % and PP > 0.95.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489086&req=5

Figure 1: Maximum likelihood (ML) tree showing the systematic position of Neohattoria relative to the Jubulaceae, Frullaniaceae and Lejeuneaceae. Wide black branches indicate ML bootstrap support > 90 % and PP > 0.95.
Mentions: The complete alignment for dataset 1 including all four regions mentioned above, with flanking areas pruned to avoid ambiguous readings, comprised 4818 characters for 54 accessions, of which 694 were parsimony informative. A total of 101 new sequences were generated for this study (Appendix 1). In the analysis of the Neohattoria sequences with accessions of the Frullaniaceae, Jubulaceae and Lejeuneaceae (dataset 1), Neohattoria is strongly supported (as defined by Pedersen et al. 2007) as one of three clades belonging to the Jubulaceae in both ML and Bayesian analyses, with accessions of Nipponolejeunea, resolved in a second clade and those of Jubula, in a third clade (Fig. 1), although the latter with low support (ML = 52, PP = 0.6). The Jubulaceae is resolved as sister to the Lejeuneaceae with strong support in both types of analysis. The position of the Frullaniaceae as sister to this latter clade (Jubulaceae + Lejeuneaceae) was strongly supported by the Bayesian analyses (PP = 1.0), but it was not recovered by the ML analyses. The Bayesian analyses also resolved Neohattoria as sister to the rest of the Jubulaceae (Nipponolejeunea + Jubula) with strong support (PP = 1.0).

Bottom Line: Over the years it has been interpreted as either a member of the genus Frullania or segregated into its own genus, Neohattoria, due to morphological similarities with both Frullania and Jubula.Here we provide molecular evidence that supports the recognition of the genus Neohattoria and its inclusion within the Jubulaceae, together with Jubula and Nipponolejeunea.Jubulaceae are placed sister to Lejeuneaceae rather than to the monogeneric Frullaniaceae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Science & Education, The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, U.S.A.

ABSTRACT
The systematic placement of Frullaniaherzogii has been contentious since its description six decades ago. Over the years it has been interpreted as either a member of the genus Frullania or segregated into its own genus, Neohattoria, due to morphological similarities with both Frullania and Jubula. Here we provide molecular evidence that supports the recognition of the genus Neohattoria and its inclusion within the Jubulaceae, together with Jubula and Nipponolejeunea. Jubulaceae are placed sister to Lejeuneaceae rather than to the monogeneric Frullaniaceae.

No MeSH data available.