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A case of postvaricella cerebral angiopathy with a good outcome in a child.

Magagnini MC, Spina LL, Gioé D, Campo GD, Belfiore G, Smilari P, Greco F - J Pediatr Neurosci (2015 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: We report a case of postvaricella cerebral angiopathy in a 5-year-old child, who was admitted after three episodes of transient right hemiplegia, each one lasting a few minutes.He had contracted chicken pox, the month prior to admission.Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei, which can be considered to be a result of vasculopathy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Pediatric Sciences, Unit of Clinical Pediatrics, University of Catania, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral vasculopathy is a serious but uncommon complication of varicella-zoster-virus (VZV) infection. Diagnosis is based on a recent history of VZV infection, signs and symptoms of transient ischemic attack or stroke, and vascular anomalies on neuroimaging. We report a case of postvaricella cerebral angiopathy in a 5-year-old child, who was admitted after three episodes of transient right hemiplegia, each one lasting a few minutes. He had contracted chicken pox, the month prior to admission. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei, which can be considered to be a result of vasculopathy.

No MeSH data available.


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Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – Coronal T2-weighted MRI acquisitions demonstrate hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei
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Figure 2: Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – Coronal T2-weighted MRI acquisitions demonstrate hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei

Mentions: He was admitted to the Ragusa Hospital Emergency Room, where he underwent laboratory testing and a brain computed tomography, which were all normal. The child was admitted to the Pediatric Department. On admission, his weight was recorded as 18.3 kg (25th percentile), his height was 117 cm (<90th percentile), and his head circumference was 52 cm (50th to 75th percentile). On physical examination, he displayed no fever, an alert sensorium, no meningism, a normal cranial nerve examination, a normal gait, and no hemiplegia. The following tests were performed: Complete blood count, inflammatory markers, hepatorenal function, coagulation, plasma amino acids, homocysteine, and transferin, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and electroencephalography: All were normal. Instead, there was an increase in anti-VZV IgM and IgG antibody levels (1/120 and 1/160, respectively). To eliminate the possibility of vascular abnormalities, a duplex ultrasound of the supra-aortic vessels was performed and was also normal. Therefore, we suspected a cerebral angiopathy. A brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei, which can be considered to be a sign of postviral vasculitis [Figures 1 and 2].


A case of postvaricella cerebral angiopathy with a good outcome in a child.

Magagnini MC, Spina LL, Gioé D, Campo GD, Belfiore G, Smilari P, Greco F - J Pediatr Neurosci (2015 Apr-Jun)

Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – Coronal T2-weighted MRI acquisitions demonstrate hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489063&req=5

Figure 2: Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – Coronal T2-weighted MRI acquisitions demonstrate hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei
Mentions: He was admitted to the Ragusa Hospital Emergency Room, where he underwent laboratory testing and a brain computed tomography, which were all normal. The child was admitted to the Pediatric Department. On admission, his weight was recorded as 18.3 kg (25th percentile), his height was 117 cm (<90th percentile), and his head circumference was 52 cm (50th to 75th percentile). On physical examination, he displayed no fever, an alert sensorium, no meningism, a normal cranial nerve examination, a normal gait, and no hemiplegia. The following tests were performed: Complete blood count, inflammatory markers, hepatorenal function, coagulation, plasma amino acids, homocysteine, and transferin, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and electroencephalography: All were normal. Instead, there was an increase in anti-VZV IgM and IgG antibody levels (1/120 and 1/160, respectively). To eliminate the possibility of vascular abnormalities, a duplex ultrasound of the supra-aortic vessels was performed and was also normal. Therefore, we suspected a cerebral angiopathy. A brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei, which can be considered to be a sign of postviral vasculitis [Figures 1 and 2].

Bottom Line: We report a case of postvaricella cerebral angiopathy in a 5-year-old child, who was admitted after three episodes of transient right hemiplegia, each one lasting a few minutes.He had contracted chicken pox, the month prior to admission.Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei, which can be considered to be a result of vasculopathy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Pediatric Sciences, Unit of Clinical Pediatrics, University of Catania, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral vasculopathy is a serious but uncommon complication of varicella-zoster-virus (VZV) infection. Diagnosis is based on a recent history of VZV infection, signs and symptoms of transient ischemic attack or stroke, and vascular anomalies on neuroimaging. We report a case of postvaricella cerebral angiopathy in a 5-year-old child, who was admitted after three episodes of transient right hemiplegia, each one lasting a few minutes. He had contracted chicken pox, the month prior to admission. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense signals in the left lenticular and caudate nuclei, which can be considered to be a result of vasculopathy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus