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Response Surface Methodology for the Optimization of Preparation of Biocomposites Based on Poly(lactic acid) and Durian Peel Cellulose.

Penjumras P, Rahman RA, Talib RA, Abdan K - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Response surface methodology was used to optimize preparation of biocomposites based on poly(lactic acid) and durian peel cellulose.The effects of cellulose loading, mixing temperature, and mixing time on tensile strength and impact strength were investigated.A second-order polynomial model was developed for predicting the tensile strength and impact strength based on the composite design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Process and Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia ; Department of Food Science and Technology, Maejo University, Phrae Campus, Phrae 54140, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Response surface methodology was used to optimize preparation of biocomposites based on poly(lactic acid) and durian peel cellulose. The effects of cellulose loading, mixing temperature, and mixing time on tensile strength and impact strength were investigated. A central composite design was employed to determine the optimum preparation condition of the biocomposites to obtain the highest tensile strength and impact strength. A second-order polynomial model was developed for predicting the tensile strength and impact strength based on the composite design. It was found that composites were best fit by a quadratic regression model with high coefficient of determination (R (2)) value. The selected optimum condition was 35 wt.% cellulose loading at 165°C and 15 min of mixing, leading to a desirability of 94.6%. Under the optimum condition, the tensile strength and impact strength of the biocomposites were 46.207 MPa and 2.931 kJ/m(2), respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scanning electron micrograph of (a) untreated durian peel and (b) cellulose.
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fig2: Scanning electron micrograph of (a) untreated durian peel and (b) cellulose.

Mentions: Figure 2 compares the micrographs of untreated durian peel and cellulose. The micrograph of untreated durian peel shows the amount of noncellulosic components; pectin, lignin, and hemicellulose scattered over the surface [18], which provide the bigger diameter than cellulose. These components were then removed after delignification and alkali treatment. The important consequence of diameter reduction was higher reinforcing ability of the cellulose for composite application because the increasing of aspect ratio (L/d, L is the length and d is diameter) [10]. Generally, the minimum aspect ratio for good strength transmission for any reinforcement material is considered at 10 [41]. In our previous paper [37], diameter distribution and aspect ratio of 70 samples of cellulose were investigated and found that the most cellulose presented diameter and aspect ratio in the range of 100–150 μm and 20–25, respectively. Thus cellulose from durian peel had an aspect ratio superior to this value.


Response Surface Methodology for the Optimization of Preparation of Biocomposites Based on Poly(lactic acid) and Durian Peel Cellulose.

Penjumras P, Rahman RA, Talib RA, Abdan K - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Scanning electron micrograph of (a) untreated durian peel and (b) cellulose.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4489010&req=5

fig2: Scanning electron micrograph of (a) untreated durian peel and (b) cellulose.
Mentions: Figure 2 compares the micrographs of untreated durian peel and cellulose. The micrograph of untreated durian peel shows the amount of noncellulosic components; pectin, lignin, and hemicellulose scattered over the surface [18], which provide the bigger diameter than cellulose. These components were then removed after delignification and alkali treatment. The important consequence of diameter reduction was higher reinforcing ability of the cellulose for composite application because the increasing of aspect ratio (L/d, L is the length and d is diameter) [10]. Generally, the minimum aspect ratio for good strength transmission for any reinforcement material is considered at 10 [41]. In our previous paper [37], diameter distribution and aspect ratio of 70 samples of cellulose were investigated and found that the most cellulose presented diameter and aspect ratio in the range of 100–150 μm and 20–25, respectively. Thus cellulose from durian peel had an aspect ratio superior to this value.

Bottom Line: Response surface methodology was used to optimize preparation of biocomposites based on poly(lactic acid) and durian peel cellulose.The effects of cellulose loading, mixing temperature, and mixing time on tensile strength and impact strength were investigated.A second-order polynomial model was developed for predicting the tensile strength and impact strength based on the composite design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Process and Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia ; Department of Food Science and Technology, Maejo University, Phrae Campus, Phrae 54140, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Response surface methodology was used to optimize preparation of biocomposites based on poly(lactic acid) and durian peel cellulose. The effects of cellulose loading, mixing temperature, and mixing time on tensile strength and impact strength were investigated. A central composite design was employed to determine the optimum preparation condition of the biocomposites to obtain the highest tensile strength and impact strength. A second-order polynomial model was developed for predicting the tensile strength and impact strength based on the composite design. It was found that composites were best fit by a quadratic regression model with high coefficient of determination (R (2)) value. The selected optimum condition was 35 wt.% cellulose loading at 165°C and 15 min of mixing, leading to a desirability of 94.6%. Under the optimum condition, the tensile strength and impact strength of the biocomposites were 46.207 MPa and 2.931 kJ/m(2), respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus