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Intake of partially defatted Brazil nut flour reduces serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic patients--a randomized controlled trial.

Carvalho RF, Huguenin GV, Luiz RR, Moreira AS, Oliveira GM, Rosa G - Nutr J (2015)

Bottom Line: The Brazil nut group showed reductions in total cholesterol (-20.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02), non HDL-cholesterol (-19.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (-10.2 ± 26.7 mg/dL, P = 0.03) without significant alterations in the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio.The placebo group showed a reduction in FT3 levels (-0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.03) and increased Lp(a) levels (5.9 ± 18.0 mg/dL, P = 0.02).Supplementation with Brazil nuts seems to favor the maintenance of FT3 levels and contributes to lipemia reduction in hypercholesterolemic and euthyroid patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Post Graduate Program, Federal Universityof Rio de Janeiro, Professor Rodolpho Paulo Rocco St, 225, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. beta_franca_carvalho@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Thyroid hormones can lower levels of atherogenic lipoproteins, and selenium is important in thyroid hormone homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the effects of a healthy diet associated with the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in dyslipidemic and hypertensive patients.

Methods: This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Seventy-seven dyslipidemic and hypertensive patients already receiving lipid-lowering drugs received either a dietary treatment associated with partially defatted Brazil nut flour (13 g/day providing 227,5 μg of selenium/day),or with dyed cassava flour as a placebo. All patients received a personalized dietary guideline with nutritional recommendations for dyslipidemia and hypertension and were followed for 90 days.

Results: The Brazil nut group showed reductions in total cholesterol (-20.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02), non HDL-cholesterol (-19.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (-10.2 ± 26.7 mg/dL, P = 0.03) without significant alterations in the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio. The placebo group showed a reduction in FT3 levels (-0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.03) and increased Lp(a) levels (5.9 ± 18.0 mg/dL, P = 0.02). There were no statistical differences in blood pressure and serum lipids between Brazil nut and placebo group.

Conclusions: Supplementation with Brazil nuts seems to favor the maintenance of FT3 levels and contributes to lipemia reduction in hypercholesterolemic and euthyroid patients.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01990391.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum total cholesterol levels in both groups over 90 days. Values are expressed as means and standard deviations with 95 % CI, n = 77. Values were measured for both groups on days 0, 30, 60 and 90. Values differed significantly only for the Brazil nut group at the T90
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Fig3: Serum total cholesterol levels in both groups over 90 days. Values are expressed as means and standard deviations with 95 % CI, n = 77. Values were measured for both groups on days 0, 30, 60 and 90. Values differed significantly only for the Brazil nut group at the T90

Mentions: Serum lipoprotein levels are presented in Table 4. There were no significant differences within or between groups in LDL-c, HDL-c, triglycerides, Apo B and the Apo B / Apo A-1 ratio during the study. After 90 days, total cholesterol (P = 0.02), non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (P = 0.03) decreased significantly only in the Brazil nut group, however there was no difference between groups. The placebo group presented an increase in Lp(a) levels (P = 0.02). Figure 3 presents the changes in total cholesterol between groups during the study.Fig. 3


Intake of partially defatted Brazil nut flour reduces serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic patients--a randomized controlled trial.

Carvalho RF, Huguenin GV, Luiz RR, Moreira AS, Oliveira GM, Rosa G - Nutr J (2015)

Serum total cholesterol levels in both groups over 90 days. Values are expressed as means and standard deviations with 95 % CI, n = 77. Values were measured for both groups on days 0, 30, 60 and 90. Values differed significantly only for the Brazil nut group at the T90
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488974&req=5

Fig3: Serum total cholesterol levels in both groups over 90 days. Values are expressed as means and standard deviations with 95 % CI, n = 77. Values were measured for both groups on days 0, 30, 60 and 90. Values differed significantly only for the Brazil nut group at the T90
Mentions: Serum lipoprotein levels are presented in Table 4. There were no significant differences within or between groups in LDL-c, HDL-c, triglycerides, Apo B and the Apo B / Apo A-1 ratio during the study. After 90 days, total cholesterol (P = 0.02), non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (P = 0.03) decreased significantly only in the Brazil nut group, however there was no difference between groups. The placebo group presented an increase in Lp(a) levels (P = 0.02). Figure 3 presents the changes in total cholesterol between groups during the study.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: The Brazil nut group showed reductions in total cholesterol (-20.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02), non HDL-cholesterol (-19.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (-10.2 ± 26.7 mg/dL, P = 0.03) without significant alterations in the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio.The placebo group showed a reduction in FT3 levels (-0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.03) and increased Lp(a) levels (5.9 ± 18.0 mg/dL, P = 0.02).Supplementation with Brazil nuts seems to favor the maintenance of FT3 levels and contributes to lipemia reduction in hypercholesterolemic and euthyroid patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Post Graduate Program, Federal Universityof Rio de Janeiro, Professor Rodolpho Paulo Rocco St, 225, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. beta_franca_carvalho@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Thyroid hormones can lower levels of atherogenic lipoproteins, and selenium is important in thyroid hormone homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the effects of a healthy diet associated with the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in dyslipidemic and hypertensive patients.

Methods: This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Seventy-seven dyslipidemic and hypertensive patients already receiving lipid-lowering drugs received either a dietary treatment associated with partially defatted Brazil nut flour (13 g/day providing 227,5 μg of selenium/day),or with dyed cassava flour as a placebo. All patients received a personalized dietary guideline with nutritional recommendations for dyslipidemia and hypertension and were followed for 90 days.

Results: The Brazil nut group showed reductions in total cholesterol (-20.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02), non HDL-cholesterol (-19.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (-10.2 ± 26.7 mg/dL, P = 0.03) without significant alterations in the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio. The placebo group showed a reduction in FT3 levels (-0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.03) and increased Lp(a) levels (5.9 ± 18.0 mg/dL, P = 0.02). There were no statistical differences in blood pressure and serum lipids between Brazil nut and placebo group.

Conclusions: Supplementation with Brazil nuts seems to favor the maintenance of FT3 levels and contributes to lipemia reduction in hypercholesterolemic and euthyroid patients.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01990391.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus