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Terra incognita-cerebellar contributions to neuropsychiatric and cognitive dysfunction in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

Tan RH, Devenney E, Kiernan MC, Halliday GM, Hodges JR, Hornberger M - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results demonstrate a relationship between cognitive and neuropsychiatric decline across various domains of memory, language, emotion, executive, visuospatial function, and motivation and the degree of gray matter degeneration in cerebellar lobules V-VII.Most notably, bilateral cerebellar lobule VII and the posterior vermis emerged as distinct for memory processes, the right cerebellar hemisphere underpinned emotion, and the posterior vermis was highlighted in language dysfunction in bvFTD.Overall, the present study underscores the significance of cortical-cerebellar networks associated with cognition and neuropsychiatric dysfunction in bvFTD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ageing and Neurodegeneration, Neuroscience Research Australia Randwick, NSW, Australia ; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although converging evidence has positioned the human cerebellum as an important relay for intact cognitive and neuropsychiatric processing, changes in this large structure remain mostly overlooked in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disease which is characterized by cognitive and neuropsychiatric deficits. The present study assessed whether degeneration in specific cerebellar subregions associate with indices of cognition and neuropsychiatric performance in bvFTD. Our results demonstrate a relationship between cognitive and neuropsychiatric decline across various domains of memory, language, emotion, executive, visuospatial function, and motivation and the degree of gray matter degeneration in cerebellar lobules V-VII. Most notably, bilateral cerebellar lobule VII and the posterior vermis emerged as distinct for memory processes, the right cerebellar hemisphere underpinned emotion, and the posterior vermis was highlighted in language dysfunction in bvFTD. Based on cortico-cerebellar connectivity maps, these findings in the cerebellum are consistent with the neural connections with the cortices involved in these domains in patients with bvFTD. Overall, the present study underscores the significance of cortical-cerebellar networks associated with cognition and neuropsychiatric dysfunction in bvFTD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Voxel-based morphometry analyses showing exclusive regions of cerebellar gray matter correlates for memory, language, emotion, executive, and visuospatial performances across all participants. Colored voxels show regions that were significant in the analyses for p < 0.01 uncorrected and a cluster threshold of 20 contiguous voxels. All clusters reported t > 3.5. Clusters are overlaid on the MNI standard brain with a mask for lobule VII (crus 1, 2, and VIIb) shown in blue and a mask for the vermis shown in light blue. L, Left Hemisphere; R, Right Hemisphere.
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Figure 3: Voxel-based morphometry analyses showing exclusive regions of cerebellar gray matter correlates for memory, language, emotion, executive, and visuospatial performances across all participants. Colored voxels show regions that were significant in the analyses for p < 0.01 uncorrected and a cluster threshold of 20 contiguous voxels. All clusters reported t > 3.5. Clusters are overlaid on the MNI standard brain with a mask for lobule VII (crus 1, 2, and VIIb) shown in blue and a mask for the vermis shown in light blue. L, Left Hemisphere; R, Right Hemisphere.

Mentions: An exclusive analysis was performed to determine cerebellar regions specific to memory, language, executive, emotion, and visuospatial scores. Bilateral lobules VII (Crus I–II) and vermis emerged as distinct to memory performance (brown color, Table 4 and Figure 3); the posterior vermis was found to be exclusively involved in language dysfunction (blue color, Table 4 and Figure 3); mild involvement of right lobules VII (Crus I) and left lobule VI was exclusive to executive functioning (pink color, Table 4 and Figure 3); bilateral lobules VI–VII (Crus I) with greater right hemisphere involvement was exclusive to emotion processing (green color, Table 4 and Figure 3), and left lobule VI emerged as exclusive to visuospatial function (red color, Table 4 and Figure 3).


Terra incognita-cerebellar contributions to neuropsychiatric and cognitive dysfunction in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

Tan RH, Devenney E, Kiernan MC, Halliday GM, Hodges JR, Hornberger M - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Voxel-based morphometry analyses showing exclusive regions of cerebellar gray matter correlates for memory, language, emotion, executive, and visuospatial performances across all participants. Colored voxels show regions that were significant in the analyses for p < 0.01 uncorrected and a cluster threshold of 20 contiguous voxels. All clusters reported t > 3.5. Clusters are overlaid on the MNI standard brain with a mask for lobule VII (crus 1, 2, and VIIb) shown in blue and a mask for the vermis shown in light blue. L, Left Hemisphere; R, Right Hemisphere.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488961&req=5

Figure 3: Voxel-based morphometry analyses showing exclusive regions of cerebellar gray matter correlates for memory, language, emotion, executive, and visuospatial performances across all participants. Colored voxels show regions that were significant in the analyses for p < 0.01 uncorrected and a cluster threshold of 20 contiguous voxels. All clusters reported t > 3.5. Clusters are overlaid on the MNI standard brain with a mask for lobule VII (crus 1, 2, and VIIb) shown in blue and a mask for the vermis shown in light blue. L, Left Hemisphere; R, Right Hemisphere.
Mentions: An exclusive analysis was performed to determine cerebellar regions specific to memory, language, executive, emotion, and visuospatial scores. Bilateral lobules VII (Crus I–II) and vermis emerged as distinct to memory performance (brown color, Table 4 and Figure 3); the posterior vermis was found to be exclusively involved in language dysfunction (blue color, Table 4 and Figure 3); mild involvement of right lobules VII (Crus I) and left lobule VI was exclusive to executive functioning (pink color, Table 4 and Figure 3); bilateral lobules VI–VII (Crus I) with greater right hemisphere involvement was exclusive to emotion processing (green color, Table 4 and Figure 3), and left lobule VI emerged as exclusive to visuospatial function (red color, Table 4 and Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Our results demonstrate a relationship between cognitive and neuropsychiatric decline across various domains of memory, language, emotion, executive, visuospatial function, and motivation and the degree of gray matter degeneration in cerebellar lobules V-VII.Most notably, bilateral cerebellar lobule VII and the posterior vermis emerged as distinct for memory processes, the right cerebellar hemisphere underpinned emotion, and the posterior vermis was highlighted in language dysfunction in bvFTD.Overall, the present study underscores the significance of cortical-cerebellar networks associated with cognition and neuropsychiatric dysfunction in bvFTD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ageing and Neurodegeneration, Neuroscience Research Australia Randwick, NSW, Australia ; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although converging evidence has positioned the human cerebellum as an important relay for intact cognitive and neuropsychiatric processing, changes in this large structure remain mostly overlooked in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disease which is characterized by cognitive and neuropsychiatric deficits. The present study assessed whether degeneration in specific cerebellar subregions associate with indices of cognition and neuropsychiatric performance in bvFTD. Our results demonstrate a relationship between cognitive and neuropsychiatric decline across various domains of memory, language, emotion, executive, visuospatial function, and motivation and the degree of gray matter degeneration in cerebellar lobules V-VII. Most notably, bilateral cerebellar lobule VII and the posterior vermis emerged as distinct for memory processes, the right cerebellar hemisphere underpinned emotion, and the posterior vermis was highlighted in language dysfunction in bvFTD. Based on cortico-cerebellar connectivity maps, these findings in the cerebellum are consistent with the neural connections with the cortices involved in these domains in patients with bvFTD. Overall, the present study underscores the significance of cortical-cerebellar networks associated with cognition and neuropsychiatric dysfunction in bvFTD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus