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A Novel Approach to Improving Fat Delivery in Neonatal Enteral Feeding.

Jarjour J, Juarez AM, Kocak DK, Liu NJ, Tabata MM, Hawthorne KM, Ramos RF, Abrams SA - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: This study determined the effect of mixing common feedings for preterm infants in the feeding bag and tubing on fat losses during enteral feeding.Laboratory models were developed to assess the contribution of various mixing techniques to delivered fat content.Fat content was measured periodically during feeding and compared to baseline measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA. jane.jarjour@alumni.rice.edu.

ABSTRACT
Continuous infusion systems used for enteral nutrition support in the neonatal intensive care unit deliver as little as 60% of the fat in human milk to the neonate. This study determined the effect of mixing common feedings for preterm infants in the feeding bag and tubing on fat losses during enteral feeding. Laboratory models were developed to assess the contribution of various mixing techniques to delivered fat content. Fat content was measured periodically during feeding and compared to baseline measurements. A multistage approach incorporating a feeding bag inverter and a tubing circulation loop delivered >90% of milk fat when used in conjunction with a commercial continuous infusion system. With unfortified human milk, this approach delivered 91.9% ± 1.5% of fat content over a one hour feed, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than 77.5% ± 2.2% delivered by continuous infusion controls (Mean ± SEM). With fortified human milk, this approach delivered 92.1% ± 2.4% of fat content, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than 79.4% ± 1.0% delivered by a non-adapted infusion system (Mean ± SEM). Mixing human milk during continuous infusion improves fat delivery, which may improve nutrition and growth outcomes in low birth weight neonates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average one-hour fat delivery efficiency in setups using unfortified breast milk. Test conditions using original pump tubing are shown in hatched bars, while test conditions using 0.5 mm ID microbore tubing are shown in black. Values are expressed as mean ± SEM of at least eight simulated feeds. *: significant change (p < 0.05) observed in delivery efficiency from the unmodified Kangaroo ePump™ infusion control.
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nutrients-07-05051-f002: Average one-hour fat delivery efficiency in setups using unfortified breast milk. Test conditions using original pump tubing are shown in hatched bars, while test conditions using 0.5 mm ID microbore tubing are shown in black. Values are expressed as mean ± SEM of at least eight simulated feeds. *: significant change (p < 0.05) observed in delivery efficiency from the unmodified Kangaroo ePump™ infusion control.

Mentions: The ePump™ + IC setup resulted in 91.9% ± 1.5% (± SE) fat delivery efficiency over one hour simulated feeds, a significant increase (p < 0.01) from the 77.5% ± 2.2% fat delivery efficiency of the control (Table 2, Figure 2). ePump™ + C feeds delivered 78.2% ± 1.6% and ePump™ + I feeds delivered 81.3% ± 2.3% of milk fat, neither of which presented a statistically significant increase over that of the control (Table 2, Figure 2).


A Novel Approach to Improving Fat Delivery in Neonatal Enteral Feeding.

Jarjour J, Juarez AM, Kocak DK, Liu NJ, Tabata MM, Hawthorne KM, Ramos RF, Abrams SA - Nutrients (2015)

Average one-hour fat delivery efficiency in setups using unfortified breast milk. Test conditions using original pump tubing are shown in hatched bars, while test conditions using 0.5 mm ID microbore tubing are shown in black. Values are expressed as mean ± SEM of at least eight simulated feeds. *: significant change (p < 0.05) observed in delivery efficiency from the unmodified Kangaroo ePump™ infusion control.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488830&req=5

nutrients-07-05051-f002: Average one-hour fat delivery efficiency in setups using unfortified breast milk. Test conditions using original pump tubing are shown in hatched bars, while test conditions using 0.5 mm ID microbore tubing are shown in black. Values are expressed as mean ± SEM of at least eight simulated feeds. *: significant change (p < 0.05) observed in delivery efficiency from the unmodified Kangaroo ePump™ infusion control.
Mentions: The ePump™ + IC setup resulted in 91.9% ± 1.5% (± SE) fat delivery efficiency over one hour simulated feeds, a significant increase (p < 0.01) from the 77.5% ± 2.2% fat delivery efficiency of the control (Table 2, Figure 2). ePump™ + C feeds delivered 78.2% ± 1.6% and ePump™ + I feeds delivered 81.3% ± 2.3% of milk fat, neither of which presented a statistically significant increase over that of the control (Table 2, Figure 2).

Bottom Line: This study determined the effect of mixing common feedings for preterm infants in the feeding bag and tubing on fat losses during enteral feeding.Laboratory models were developed to assess the contribution of various mixing techniques to delivered fat content.Fat content was measured periodically during feeding and compared to baseline measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA. jane.jarjour@alumni.rice.edu.

ABSTRACT
Continuous infusion systems used for enteral nutrition support in the neonatal intensive care unit deliver as little as 60% of the fat in human milk to the neonate. This study determined the effect of mixing common feedings for preterm infants in the feeding bag and tubing on fat losses during enteral feeding. Laboratory models were developed to assess the contribution of various mixing techniques to delivered fat content. Fat content was measured periodically during feeding and compared to baseline measurements. A multistage approach incorporating a feeding bag inverter and a tubing circulation loop delivered >90% of milk fat when used in conjunction with a commercial continuous infusion system. With unfortified human milk, this approach delivered 91.9% ± 1.5% of fat content over a one hour feed, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than 77.5% ± 2.2% delivered by continuous infusion controls (Mean ± SEM). With fortified human milk, this approach delivered 92.1% ± 2.4% of fat content, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than 79.4% ± 1.0% delivered by a non-adapted infusion system (Mean ± SEM). Mixing human milk during continuous infusion improves fat delivery, which may improve nutrition and growth outcomes in low birth weight neonates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus