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Evaluation of a Mobile Phone Image-Based Dietary Assessment Method in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell AW - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Agreement between dietitians for nutrient intake for the 3-day NuDAM (Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.77-0.99) was lower when compared with the 3-day WFR (ICC = 0.82-0.99).These findings demonstrate the performance and feasibility of the NuDAM to assess energy and macronutrient intake in a small sample.Some modifications to the NuDAM could improve efficiency and an evaluation in a larger group of adults with T2DM is required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition and School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales 2308, Australia. megan.rollo@newcastle.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Image-based dietary records have limited evidence evaluating their performance and use among adults with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the performance of a 3-day mobile phone image-based dietary record, the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM), in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Criterion validity was determined by comparing energy intake (EI) with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by the doubly-labelled water technique. Relative validity was established by comparison to a weighed food record (WFR). Inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing estimates of intake from three dietitians. Ten adults (6 males, age: 61.2 ± 6.9 years old, BMI: 31.0 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)) participated. Compared to TEE, mean EI (MJ/day) was significantly under-reported using both methods, with a mean ratio of EI:TEE 0.76 ± 0.20 for the NuDAM and 0.76 ± 0.17 for the WFR. Correlations between the NuDAM and WFR were mostly moderate for energy (r = 0.57), carbohydrate (g/day) (r = 0.63, p < 0.05), protein (g/day) (r = 0.78, p < 0.01) and alcohol (g/day) (rs = 0.85, p < 0.01), with a weaker relationship for fat (g/day) (r = 0.24). Agreement between dietitians for nutrient intake for the 3-day NuDAM (Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.77-0.99) was lower when compared with the 3-day WFR (ICC = 0.82-0.99). These findings demonstrate the performance and feasibility of the NuDAM to assess energy and macronutrient intake in a small sample. Some modifications to the NuDAM could improve efficiency and an evaluation in a larger group of adults with T2DM is required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM). For the collection of dietary intake data, a mobile phone is used to capture the Nutricam image-based dietary record (A) and is combined with information collected via a phone call (using a standardized interview protocol) (B) Analysis consisted of the dietitian identifying and quantifying food items contained in each Nutricam dietary record entry (C) A standardized protocol and the Dietary Estimation and Assessment Tool (DEAT) (a two-dimensional portion size estimation aid (D)) was used to assist in the task of quantifying the food items. Dietary data was entered directly into the nutrient analysis software program, FoodWorks® (E) to obtain an estimate of nutrient intake. Data from the follow-up phone call (B) is used to supplement the Nutricam dietary record, with adjustments made by the dietitian to the analysis (E) as required.
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nutrients-07-04897-f001: Overview of the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM). For the collection of dietary intake data, a mobile phone is used to capture the Nutricam image-based dietary record (A) and is combined with information collected via a phone call (using a standardized interview protocol) (B) Analysis consisted of the dietitian identifying and quantifying food items contained in each Nutricam dietary record entry (C) A standardized protocol and the Dietary Estimation and Assessment Tool (DEAT) (a two-dimensional portion size estimation aid (D)) was used to assist in the task of quantifying the food items. Dietary data was entered directly into the nutrient analysis software program, FoodWorks® (E) to obtain an estimate of nutrient intake. Data from the follow-up phone call (B) is used to supplement the Nutricam dietary record, with adjustments made by the dietitian to the analysis (E) as required.

Mentions: The NuDAM consisted of a prospective mobile phone Nutricam image-based dietary record and brief phone call to the subject the following day (Figure 1). Details of the development and early testing of Nutricam have been described previously [8]. Building on this earlier work, the NuDAM method was modified to incorporate a follow-up phone call component to clarify items in the Nutricam record and probe for commonly forgotten foods. In addition, the current study used a standardized analysis protocol including an aid (called the Dietary Estimation and Assessment Tool) to assist in the quantification of food portions contained in the images.


Evaluation of a Mobile Phone Image-Based Dietary Assessment Method in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

Rollo ME, Ash S, Lyons-Wall P, Russell AW - Nutrients (2015)

Overview of the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM). For the collection of dietary intake data, a mobile phone is used to capture the Nutricam image-based dietary record (A) and is combined with information collected via a phone call (using a standardized interview protocol) (B) Analysis consisted of the dietitian identifying and quantifying food items contained in each Nutricam dietary record entry (C) A standardized protocol and the Dietary Estimation and Assessment Tool (DEAT) (a two-dimensional portion size estimation aid (D)) was used to assist in the task of quantifying the food items. Dietary data was entered directly into the nutrient analysis software program, FoodWorks® (E) to obtain an estimate of nutrient intake. Data from the follow-up phone call (B) is used to supplement the Nutricam dietary record, with adjustments made by the dietitian to the analysis (E) as required.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488822&req=5

nutrients-07-04897-f001: Overview of the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM). For the collection of dietary intake data, a mobile phone is used to capture the Nutricam image-based dietary record (A) and is combined with information collected via a phone call (using a standardized interview protocol) (B) Analysis consisted of the dietitian identifying and quantifying food items contained in each Nutricam dietary record entry (C) A standardized protocol and the Dietary Estimation and Assessment Tool (DEAT) (a two-dimensional portion size estimation aid (D)) was used to assist in the task of quantifying the food items. Dietary data was entered directly into the nutrient analysis software program, FoodWorks® (E) to obtain an estimate of nutrient intake. Data from the follow-up phone call (B) is used to supplement the Nutricam dietary record, with adjustments made by the dietitian to the analysis (E) as required.
Mentions: The NuDAM consisted of a prospective mobile phone Nutricam image-based dietary record and brief phone call to the subject the following day (Figure 1). Details of the development and early testing of Nutricam have been described previously [8]. Building on this earlier work, the NuDAM method was modified to incorporate a follow-up phone call component to clarify items in the Nutricam record and probe for commonly forgotten foods. In addition, the current study used a standardized analysis protocol including an aid (called the Dietary Estimation and Assessment Tool) to assist in the quantification of food portions contained in the images.

Bottom Line: Agreement between dietitians for nutrient intake for the 3-day NuDAM (Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.77-0.99) was lower when compared with the 3-day WFR (ICC = 0.82-0.99).These findings demonstrate the performance and feasibility of the NuDAM to assess energy and macronutrient intake in a small sample.Some modifications to the NuDAM could improve efficiency and an evaluation in a larger group of adults with T2DM is required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition and School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales 2308, Australia. megan.rollo@newcastle.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Image-based dietary records have limited evidence evaluating their performance and use among adults with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the performance of a 3-day mobile phone image-based dietary record, the Nutricam Dietary Assessment Method (NuDAM), in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Criterion validity was determined by comparing energy intake (EI) with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by the doubly-labelled water technique. Relative validity was established by comparison to a weighed food record (WFR). Inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing estimates of intake from three dietitians. Ten adults (6 males, age: 61.2 ± 6.9 years old, BMI: 31.0 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)) participated. Compared to TEE, mean EI (MJ/day) was significantly under-reported using both methods, with a mean ratio of EI:TEE 0.76 ± 0.20 for the NuDAM and 0.76 ± 0.17 for the WFR. Correlations between the NuDAM and WFR were mostly moderate for energy (r = 0.57), carbohydrate (g/day) (r = 0.63, p < 0.05), protein (g/day) (r = 0.78, p < 0.01) and alcohol (g/day) (rs = 0.85, p < 0.01), with a weaker relationship for fat (g/day) (r = 0.24). Agreement between dietitians for nutrient intake for the 3-day NuDAM (Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.77-0.99) was lower when compared with the 3-day WFR (ICC = 0.82-0.99). These findings demonstrate the performance and feasibility of the NuDAM to assess energy and macronutrient intake in a small sample. Some modifications to the NuDAM could improve efficiency and an evaluation in a larger group of adults with T2DM is required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus