Limits...
I Eat Healthier Than You: Differences in Healthy and Unhealthy Food Choices for Oneself and for Others.

Sproesser G, Kohlbrenner V, Schupp H, Renner B - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal).Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs.This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychological Assessment and Health Psychology, University of Konstanz, P.O. Box 47, Konstanz 78457, Germany. gudrun.sproesser@uni-konstanz.de.

ABSTRACT
The present study investigated self-other biases in actual eating behavior based on the observation of three different eating situations. To capture the complexity of real life food choices within a well-controlled setting, an ecologically valid fake food buffet with 72 different foods was employed. Sixty participants chose a healthy, a typical, and an unhealthy meal for themselves and for an average peer. We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal). Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs. M = 3929 kJ or 939 kcal on average for the own meals) and more high-caloric food items for a typical meal, indicating a self-other bias. This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

No MeSH data available.


Amount of energy chosen from the fake food buffet as a function of meal type and target. Error bars indicate standard errors of the mean. ***p < 0.001, **p < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488806&req=5

nutrients-07-04638-f002: Amount of energy chosen from the fake food buffet as a function of meal type and target. Error bars indicate standard errors of the mean. ***p < 0.001, **p < 0.01.

Mentions: Effects of meal type: Behavioral standards for the self. All simple contrasts of meal type within the self were significant (see Table 1). As shown in Figure 2, participants chose for themselves 3929 kJ (SE = 207; 939 kcal, SE = 49.5) for a typical meal, 2561 kJ (SE = 166; 612 kcal, SE = 39.6) for the healthy meal, and 7004 kJ (SE = 373; 1674 kcal, SE = 89.2) for the unhealthy meal. Thus, participants set different behavioral standards across the three different meal types when choosing for themselves.


I Eat Healthier Than You: Differences in Healthy and Unhealthy Food Choices for Oneself and for Others.

Sproesser G, Kohlbrenner V, Schupp H, Renner B - Nutrients (2015)

Amount of energy chosen from the fake food buffet as a function of meal type and target. Error bars indicate standard errors of the mean. ***p < 0.001, **p < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488806&req=5

nutrients-07-04638-f002: Amount of energy chosen from the fake food buffet as a function of meal type and target. Error bars indicate standard errors of the mean. ***p < 0.001, **p < 0.01.
Mentions: Effects of meal type: Behavioral standards for the self. All simple contrasts of meal type within the self were significant (see Table 1). As shown in Figure 2, participants chose for themselves 3929 kJ (SE = 207; 939 kcal, SE = 49.5) for a typical meal, 2561 kJ (SE = 166; 612 kcal, SE = 39.6) for the healthy meal, and 7004 kJ (SE = 373; 1674 kcal, SE = 89.2) for the unhealthy meal. Thus, participants set different behavioral standards across the three different meal types when choosing for themselves.

Bottom Line: We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal).Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs.This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychological Assessment and Health Psychology, University of Konstanz, P.O. Box 47, Konstanz 78457, Germany. gudrun.sproesser@uni-konstanz.de.

ABSTRACT
The present study investigated self-other biases in actual eating behavior based on the observation of three different eating situations. To capture the complexity of real life food choices within a well-controlled setting, an ecologically valid fake food buffet with 72 different foods was employed. Sixty participants chose a healthy, a typical, and an unhealthy meal for themselves and for an average peer. We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal). Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs. M = 3929 kJ or 939 kcal on average for the own meals) and more high-caloric food items for a typical meal, indicating a self-other bias. This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

No MeSH data available.